Trump's deportation plan could cost taxpayers half a trillion dollars


#1

Much will require congressional approval, but by any full accounting, the fiscal and economic costs of Trump’s plan would be huge.

Recently the Trump administration has backed off earlier pledges to deport anyone in the country illegally — Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly said Thursday “there will be no mass deportations” after he met with Mexican officials.

Still, the Trump administration also this week directed government agencies to, among other things, begin rounding up and deporting anyone in the country illegally, whether or not they have committed serious crimes.

The new Trump initiative includes hiring thousands of new immigration agents, building new detention centers and constructing a southern border wall that was a centerpiece of Trump’s election campaign.

If the U.S. would seek to remove the entire population of the estimated 11 million undocumented workers now in the U.S., it would cost upwards of half trillion dollars, according to one estimate. It could also wipe out a chunk of the American economy roughly the size of the annual gross domestic product of Texas.

cnbc.com/2017/02/24/trumps-deportation-plan-could-cost-half-a-trillion-dollars.html


#2

And the same people supporting this tend to be against welfare “due to the costs,” even though it would cost a fraction of a half-baked deportation plan. :shrug:


#3

The false assumptions, of course, are that there is to be some kind of “roundup” of all illegal aliens and that there will be no reasonable formula for return. Fact is, all of them I know go back to their home countries frequently. If Trump really means to have a “great big door” to allow return for those who actually do go identify themselves at an American embassy and pay the fine, it might actually be profitable to the government. If, simultaneously or later, the government actually allows employers to meaningfully check ID, and requires it, that could also help “legalize” some and exclude some if the “legalization” process was demanding but relatively benign in granting residence and working permits.

For the illegals who did not come across the southern border, but overstayed visas or entered illegally, return would be more difficult, it’s true. But again, if it was known the government is now serious about excluding or “regularizing” illegals from other places, they could prepare for that requirement. Granted, it would be easier for those who are gainfully employed than for those who are not. But perhaps that’s as it should be.

Blanket amnesty, of course, is the proposal most seen on the part of the “open borders” folks. That solves nothing for the future, as we have learned, though it is ideologically satisfying for some. But even blanket amnesty will have its costs.


#4

Come on… I’m not going to tout Trump as a Saint, but does anyone honestly think Trump will cost Americans money? That’s the last thing he would do. This is scare tactics. The government already incarcerates and deports many illegal felons. They just come back.

Americans need to stop compromising the law and honesty on the premise of “opening our arms to immigrants”. It’s simplistic and ignorant.

Do you realize that many illegals rely on State aid? The issue is so much more complicated than counting the cost of a massive, blind, and mongrolish deporting of all undocumented immigrants.


#5

Yep


#6

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