turn the other cheek


#1

Ave Maria!
The Vatian is confusing me. Jesus talked about turning the other cheek but the Vatican is puting a former butler in jail. Doesn’t Jesus’s message about turning the other cheek matter any more?


#2

“Turning the other cheek” in this instance means that the butler is being given a light jail sentence, instead of being SHOT for TREASON.


#3

Turning the other cheek does not mean we should refuse proper justice. If turning the other cheek meant to beckon someone to keep striking you, then Jesus should not have fled when people went to stone him or beat him. Rather, giving due justice is different than what the turn the other cheek passage is about - which decries some form of “revenge”. Due justice is not revenge. They significantly lessened his sentence, by the way, and the Pope may still issue him a pardon. But that would merely be an act of generosity.


#4

For me, “turn the other cheek” has been an important tool when applied metaphorically to arguments.

When someone insults me, then instead of snapping back, I make sure I understand what they are saying so I have the “full cheek” message rather than just one side that I’m trying to interpret. Once they slap both cheeks, it’s like stereo – adds another dimension to my learning.

The reason I thrive on insults, is that now and then one gives me a gem of an idea how I can improve myself, and it makes me a happier me. For that I say “thank you” to all those who have found fault with me.

So, anyway that’s what I have been able to gather out of the phrase. I’m a chicken when it comes to fighting, so I don’t know about physically turning the other cheek. I have, however, heard of fighting without fighting. :smiley:

Alan


closed #5

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