Twelve Apostles


#1

Is the Pope considered an apostle?


#2

[quote=allisonP]Is the Pope considered an apostle?
[/quote]

The Pope is a bishop. The bishops are considered the successors of the apostles.


#3

[quote=allisonP]Is the Pope considered an apostle?
[/quote]

The Pope is also specifically the successor to Peter.


#4

By saying he is a successor to Peter, is that the same as saying he is an apostle?
I am still trying to understand.


#5

[quote=allisonP]By saying he is a successor to Peter, is that the same as saying he is an apostle?
I am still trying to understand.
[/quote]

Pope Paul VI calls all the Baptized faithful “Lay apostles” because by our Baptism and Confirmation we are sent into the world to proclaim the Gospel through our lives.

To be an “Apostle” requires that the person was actually present with Christ during His public ministry. We see this in the Book of Acts when they choose the replacement for Judas.


#6

No. Historically speaking, there are no more apostles after the death of the last apostle. The pope is not an apostle. He is successor to Peter as head of the Church. Peter was both an apostle and the first pope.


#7

[quote=allisonP]By saying he is a successor to Peter, is that the same as saying he is an apostle?
I am still trying to understand.
[/quote]

We tend to reserve the title “Apostle” for those apostles mentioned in Scripture – the 12, and 3 or 4 others, like Barnabas and Apollos.

Since the word “apostle” means “one who is sent,” we recognize in the Bishops the apostolic authority committed to them by the Holy Spirit at their ordination. That authority abides, when, in communion with the successor of Peter and with one another, they exercise the offices given to the Apostles by Christ in John 20:19-23 and at the Great Commission in Matthew 28:19-20. While the Bishops alone hold certain sacramental gifts through Apostolic Succession, all members of the Church participate in the apostolic mission according to their vocation and condition of life.


#8

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]Pope Paul VI calls all the Baptized faithful “Lay apostles” because by our Baptism and Confirmation we are sent into the world to proclaim the Gospel through our lives.

To be an “Apostle” requires that the person was actually present with Christ during His public ministry. We see this in the Book of Acts when they choose the replacement for Judas.
[/quote]

How about St Paul who was an Apostle (some say the greatest Apostle)? He was not actually present with Christ during his public ministry. In fact Paul never even saw Jesus when he was still alive.


#9

[quote=thistle]How about St Paul who was an Apostle (some say the greatest Apostle)? He was not actually present with Christ during his public ministry. In fact Paul never even saw Jesus when he was still alive.
[/quote]

How exactly do we know that Paul was not in the crowd watching? He was chosen directly by Christ.


#10

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]How exactly do we know that Paul was not in the crowd watching? He was chosen directly by Christ.
[/quote]

I know he was directly chosen by Christ but there is nothing in scripture to suggest he had ever seen Christ during his ministry. Even if he had heard Jesus that does not fulfil the criteria you gave.
Being in the crowd listening to Jesus did not make the whole crowd apostles (they might all have become disciples but not apostles). Jesus chose the men he wanted to be apostles and these were the ones who were present with him during his ministry (i.e. the ones he chose to accompany him).
Jesus’ choice of Paul was separate from those with Jesus for the three years of his ministry.


#11

The term “apostle” may be used loosely to refer to anyone who is “sent forth,” especially if that person has made notable achievements in his call to missionary work. Blessed Junipero Serra, for example, is often referred to as the “Apostle to California.” Serra was not a bishop, but he was granted special permission by the pope to administer the sacrament of Confirmation to several thousand Indians along the California coast in the late 1700’s.


#12

While we are not called apostles; however, we are part of the apostolate as described in ***APOSTOLICAM ACTUOSITATEM…

***2. The Church was founded for the purpose of spreading the kingdom of Christ throughout the earth for the glory of God the Father, to enable all men to share in His saving redemption,(1) and that through them the whole world might enter into a relationship with Christ. All activity of the Mystical Body directed to the attainment of this goal is called the apostolate, which the Church carries on in various ways through all her members. For the Christian vocation by its very nature is also a vocation to the apostolate. No part of the structure of a living body is merely passive but has a share in the functions as well as life of the body: so, too, in the body of Christ, which is the Church, “the whole body . . . in keeping with the proper activity of each part, derives its increase from its own internal development” (Eph. 4:16).


#13

[quote=thistle]I know he was directly chosen by Christ but there is nothing in scripture to suggest he had ever seen Christ during his ministry. Even if he had heard Jesus that does not fulfil the criteria you gave.
Being in the crowd listening to Jesus did not make the whole crowd apostles (they might all have become disciples but not apostles). Jesus chose the men he wanted to be apostles and these were the ones who were present with him during his ministry (i.e. the ones he chose to accompany him).
Jesus’ choice of Paul was separate from those with Jesus for the three years of his ministry.
[/quote]

With Paul I believe that it is primarily that he was Jesus’ choice.


#14

Thank you all for answering me. :smiley:


#15

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