U.S. eyeing Alberta oilsands

U.S. eyeing Alberta oilsands

According to data obtained by the Reuters news agency, the U.S. Energy Information Administration estimates America’s oil imports from Canada will almost double by 2025, from 1.6 million barrels a day to 2.7 million barrels a day.

The vast majority of that increased production will come from Alberta’s oilsands, which are expected to produce as much as three million barrels a day by 2020… In October, Utah Senator Orrin Hatch said Canada was poised to surpass Saudi Arabia as “the world’s oil giant” in the 21st century.

Alberta’s oilsands hold an estimated 175 billion barrels of recoverable oil, second only to Saudi Arabia in terms of overall reserves.
U.S. Vice-President Dick Cheney had planned to visit Fort McMurray – the hub of Alberta’s oilsands production – last September but postponed the trip because of the Hurricane Katrina crisis. Officials with the Canadian embassy in Washington say they are trying to reschedule the visit.

[quote=Ani Ibi]U.S. eyeing Alberta oilsands
[/quote]

so much for the search for alternatives!

What ever happened to the shale oil deposits here in the US ?

My friend is from Alberta and now lives in the US. She tells me that there’s lots of people in Alberta that actually would rather be a part of the United States than Canada, and that some of their MPs have introduced legislature to become a State. She tells me that most people up there are conservative, while most people running their country in Ontario are too left-wing socialist. I just wonder how popular support is in Alberta for seceding from Canada?

[quote=walstan]so much for the search for alternatives!
[/quote]

I think it’s obvious that alternatives are not going to be viable overnight.

I say good, I would rather my money go to Canada (love Labatts beer) than to the middle east.

[quote=Semper Fi]My friend is from Alberta and now lives in the US. She tells me that there’s lots of people in Alberta that actually would rather be a part of the United States than Canada, and that some of their MPs have introduced legislature to become a State.
[/quote]

Some explanation of the Canadian psyche: unlike Americans who have a beginning (the Revolution), Canadians start where ever we find ourselves and are constantly re-defining ourselves. Being Canadian is a work in progress.

[quote=Semper Fi]She tells me that most people up there are conservative, while most people running their country in Ontario are too left-wing socialist. I just wonder how popular support is in Alberta for seceding from Canada?
[/quote]

The psyche of Quebec and Ontario was set earlier than that of the West. After the Revolution, the English were still in control north of the border. The colonists here were suspicious of the Americans because the Americans were populists.

Quebec was afraid of the populist movement in France during the French Revolution, what with the appalling violence and disorder. The English settlers were still monarchists. The First Nations had been betrayed so many times by the Americans that they foolishly ran into the arms of the English who would ultimately also betrayed them.

The folks out West by the time Canada got out West had grown accustomed to the American experiment. America was no longer a young upstart. It was a viable vibrant economy.

The trick to understanding Canadians is in understanding three ways of thinking:

  1. fear of populism which expressed itself most immediately in Americanism;

  2. the double-dealing of the English in manipulating Kebekers, English colonists, and First Nations peoples to fight against the Americans in order to maintain English power in North America;

  3. Family Compact.

Canada Rejects Populism—Again

Family Compact

I suspect that the movements to join the US are more an expression of frustration with and alienation from eastern Canada. Likely the regions will secede, but they will be self-governing in a loose federation. (My opinion).

The US should not entertain the thought of governing the regions: we are ungovernable. The ways of life are too foreign to each other. We do not start at the Revolution. We start where ever we find ourselves. How will you ever overcome that hurdle?

I don’t remotely think that the US should annex any Canadian provinces. Given that caveat, though, and enjoying though experiments, I do have to disagree that it would be impossible for the US to govern the provinces. There are many regions within the US which have cultures completely foreign to each other - we are not nearly as homogenous as it may appear to an outsider (or even to many of my fellow Americans). Scratch beneath the surface of minimalls and prime-time tv and you’ll find that we remain vibrantly diverse. Even in smaller geographic areas, such as our cities, this is the case (there’s even a book on New York called 'The UnGovernable City").

And yet for all that, we remain one nation. E Pluribus Unum indeed.:slight_smile:

[quote=Semper Fi]I think it’s obvious that alternatives are not going to be viable overnight.
[/quote]

There are many research projects going on all the time. Here is just one I know of. I am certain if you looked you would find many such projects. It is foolish for people to think we are doing nothing.
purdueexponent.org/index.php/module/Issue/action/Article/article_id/1876

Here is another discovery:
purdueexponent.org/index.php/module/Issue/action/Article/article_id/1854

purdueexponent.org/index.php/module/Issue/action/Article/article_id/1810

Owing to Global Warming, everybody is going to be able to move further north to stay cool.

Some guy already wrote a book called Mexifornia.

So I guess it is only fair that people in Washington State, Idaho, Wyoming, North Dakota and Wisconsin move north also.


By the way, I am really surprised that there hasn’t been an Environmental Impact Statement about the digging all those humongous holes in Alberta. You know, requiring them all filled with topsoil or something.

[quote=Fitz]There are many research projects going on all the time. Here is just one I know of. I am certain if you looked you would find many such projects. It is foolish for people to think we are doing nothing.
[/quote]

I never said that we were not doing research, obviously we are. However, it is going to take 20-30 years at best to move our economy away from an oil based economy. Even then, we will still need some oil for plastics and such.

[quote=Ani Ibi]Some explanation of the Canadian psyche: unlike Americans who have a beginning (the Revolution), Canadians start where ever we find ourselves and are constantly re-defining ourselves. Being Canadian is a work in progress.

The psyche of Quebec and Ontario was set earlier than that of the West. After the Revolution, the English were still in control north of the border. The colonists here were suspicious of the Americans because the Americans were populists.

Quebec was afraid of the populist movement in France during the French Revolution, what with the appalling violence and disorder. The English settlers were still monarchists. The First Nations had been betrayed so many times by the Americans that they foolishly ran into the arms of the English who would ultimately also betrayed them.

The folks out West by the time Canada got out West had grown accustomed to the American experiment. America was no longer a young upstart. It was a viable vibrant economy.

The trick to understanding Canadians is in understanding three ways of thinking:

  1. fear of populism which expressed itself most immediately in Americanism;

  2. the double-dealing of the English in manipulating Kebekers, English colonists, and First Nations peoples to fight against the Americans in order to maintain English power in North America;

  3. Family Compact.

Canada Rejects Populism—Again

Family Compact

I suspect that the movements to join the US are more an expression of frustration with and alienation from eastern Canada. Likely the regions will secede, but they will be self-governing in a loose federation. (My opinion).

The US should not entertain the thought of governing the regions: we are ungovernable. The ways of life are too foreign to each other. We do not start at the Revolution. We start where ever we find ourselves. How will you ever overcome that hurdle?
[/quote]

Pretty interesting stuff. However, only 13 of our states have their beginnings at the Revolutionary War.

[quote=Semper Fi]I never said that we were not doing research, obviously we are. However, it is going to take 20-30 years at best to move our economy away from an oil based economy. Even then, we will still need some oil for plastics and such.
[/quote]

I did not mean to accuse you of anything. I deal with some very negative people at work and in my extended family. I get tired of hearing what we are not doing. I will be purchasing a hybrid car this year to gain the tax credit. This has been happening for a few years now. I guess I would like more people to be aware of what we are doing.

Of course this move away from oil dependence won’t happen overnight. We did not build our dependence overnight either. You are right, we will always need oil. If we cut back on our consumption, and also develop other sources of energy at the same time we can really solve this problem. It has to be a priority.

[quote=Fitz]I did not mean to accuse you of anything. I deal with some very negative people at work and in my extended family. I get tired of hearing what we are not doing. I will be purchasing a hybrid car this year to gain the tax credit. This has been happening for a few years now. I guess I would like more people to be aware of what we are doing.

Of course this move away from oil dependence won’t happen overnight. We did not build our dependence overnight either. You are right, we will always need oil. If we cut back on our consumption, and also develop other sources of energy at the same time we can really solve this problem. It has to be a priority.
[/quote]

I am honestly not sure how you got that I was being negative out of that… It’s just going to take time to develop a viable alternative and to move from our oil based economy. It’s surprising to me that we still haven’t moved away from internal combustion engines yet, those things are ancient…

[quote=Semper Fi]Pretty interesting stuff. However, only 13 of our states have their beginnings at the Revolutionary War.
[/quote]

:rotfl: True. Ya got me. I keep on forgetting the State Rights scenario. Nevertheless, do people outside the 13 colonies not also refer back to the time of the Revolution? Wasn’t every American at the Boston Tea Party?

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