UK warns about anti-LGBT laws to travelers


#1

cnn.com/2016/04/21/travel/uk-lgbt-travel-advice-north-carolina-mississippi/index.html

North Carolina and Mississippi’s controversial new laws affecting LGBT rights are already threatening to cost the U.S. states millions in lost business and tourism.

That situation could be set to worsen after the UK government updated foreign travel advice warning British citizens about risks visiting America’s south.

The update issued by the UK Foreign Office on its website under the heading of “local laws and customs,” highlights potential problems for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LBGT) people.

“The U.S. is an extremely diverse society and attitudes towards LGBT people differ hugely across the country,” it says. “LGBT travelers may be affected by legislation passed recently in the states of North Carolina and Mississippi.”

The warning comes just ahead of President Obama and Michelle Obama’s visit to the UK to celebrate Queen Elizabeth’s 90th birthday.

The U.S. is now one of a number of countries and territories about which the UK Foreign Office offers advice to LGBT travelers.

In its general advice, it states that attitudes around the world “can be very different to those of the UK,” but travelers are unlikely to have any problems if they prepare well and research their destination before they go.

This comes to little surprise. I was talking to a guy about US politics and he said that the world hates America, especially The South, because it represents the worst of America. I was also on a graduate student forum reading a thread dated 2012 warning students to stay away from Southern universities because “there’s a reason why,” which I can only guess “the reason why” is that belief that such a region is not LGBT friendly.

UK has done similar things. It banned Mark Savage from entering and Donal Trump’s ban is currently pending.

I’m not even white and I think all this “gotta keep your wits about ya in The South” is just plain ol’ idiocy. In great irony it’s fear-mongering and in some ways black mailing (PayPal, Springsteen, Gov. Cuomo).


#2

I agree with you. This sort of stuff is stupid.


#3

What a joke.

Besides, it should not even effect L (Lesbian), G (Gay) or B (Bisexual) people at all, it would only effect those who identify themselves as transgender, and as far as I know all this basically says is a man can’t decide to use the womans bathroom or change room etc, simply because they view themselves as the opposite sex.

It should be basic common sense really.

I hope this has helped

God Bless

Thank you for reading
Josh


#4

…travellers are unlikely to have any problems if they prepare well and research their destination before they go.

Points to the FCO for stating the bleedin’ obvious :rolleyes:

Banning someone from your country for being an obnoxious [thing I will not say in polite society], and telling people to be careful if they go abroad, are very different things.

Whatever the rights of free speech Mark Savage has, he has more or less nothing useful to contribute to anything; if him airing his pretty revolting views is so important for Americans, he can stay there.

Trump isn’t and won’t be banned; there was a petition that reached the threshold for a parliamentary debate under an absurd system we have recently attained whereby any public petition to Parliament that reaches 100,000 signatures can be debated (if a committee decides it’s appropriate). In any case it’s quite clear that Trump believes nothing that comes out of his own mouth except statements about his own greatness, so he’s hardly a security threat.

FWIW, the South represents a lot of America at its best, whatever the stereotyped views that are had of its inhabitants’ stance on the LGBT community.


#5

If Trump wants to ban an entire group of people from entering the U.S…why then can we not ban Mark Savage and potentially him as well (the ban on Trump won’t pass IMHO)?

In principle I don’t support banning people in a free society, I’m merely playing devils advocate. :wink:

I don’t think we should ban these people, although I do find Mr Savage detestable.


#6

I think you’ve got this wrong.

The actual statement from the FCO said nothing about “the South”. It refers very clearly to a specific legal situation in the States of Missisipi and North Carolina. Nothing about “the South” generally.

Your perception that foreigners consider the South to epitomize everything that’s wrong about the U.S. also misses the mark. It’s untrue.

A lot of the popular culture streaming from America over the years has actually given foreigners a very positive, romanticized account of Southern culture. The stunning but feisty Scarlet O’Hara from Gone with the Wind, the idyllic Waltons with “Goodnight John Boy”, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, the wealthy decadence of ‘Dallas’ etc.

These shows have created the common idea abroad, at least in Britain, that Southerners have uncommonly good, gentlemanly manners and hospitality - epitomized in the phrase, “Yes ma’am”. Southern men are seen as laid-back, hospitable, happy and carefree dudes. The ladies are inevitably pretty with a winning smile, flirtatious personality and an unforgettably sassy drawl.

Interestingly, the South is seen paradoxically: intensely innocent and family-friendly but the popular image also happens to be one of bodice-ripping passion.

Warm, sweaty bodies and hot heads in a hot climate equals strapping men in butternut uniforms storming Union trenches and beautiful Southern belles (usually understood to be blondes, of course) with elaborate dresses living in huge white ranches - and fluttering their eyelashes, of course. Well, that was my mother’s and grandmothers image of it anyway in their youth - so much so that my mom still retains a not so secret desire to live on a ranch with horses :rolleyes: If you consider the cold, northern climes of my home country you might understand why a girl from here might fantasize about such a scenario. She also notes frequently - and with approval - how “well-mannered” Southern males are. So as you can see, heavily romanticized and idealised.

And then, of course, there’s the irresistible charm of country music and blues. Elvis Presley - needs no introduction.

Then again, we do also have the “hillbilly” image - which can be a bit of a caricature. And we’re not unaware of antebellum slavery, Jim Crow and the KKK - but every society has its darker side. So the South is definitely both idealised and caricatured.

It’s patently false though to say that the South is viewed uniformly in a negative light abroad.


#7

There is no ban on Trump pending in the UK. What happened was enough signatures were gathered via a petititon that the matter had to be discussed in parliament, but there are no plans to ban him. Much as I find his style odious I would see no good or justifiable reason to ban him.


#8

I forgot to mention Mark Twain, Harper Lee and William Faulkner, three literary giants :smiley:


#9

Agreed :thumbsup:


#10

If the rest of the world despises the South it is only mirroring the rest of the US.


#11

On my facebook feed I have seen otherwise good people say that they will kill a man if he goes into the bathroom with their wife or child (a Franciscan no less :frowning: ). You can call it hyperbole if you want but if I was transgendered I would be terrified. It’s only a matter of time before these laws result in someone getting killed.

I think these warnings are apt.


#12

We were warned the world would hate us…

Instead of being terrified, mentally ill transgendered people should not try to use the wrong bathroom. And then get some professional help to assist with their mental illness.


#13

In my 16 yrs online I’ve discovered a surprising number of people in Western Europe who believe the US is crawling with extreme right wing, racist, gun toting, bible literalists, who are ready to lynch minorities and homosexuals at the drop of a hat.


#14

Or perhaps people can refrain from making threats of murder for using the “wrong” bathroom. Is there a better way to voice displeasure that doesn’t involve murder or castration (that’s another popular meme out there)?

Bathrooms and birthday cakes, the leading right wing issues of the day :rolleyes:


#15

That’s the strange part. All the states not in the The South, or at least not named North Carolina, have no official law on whether or not transgenders can use whichever bathroom they want - it’s still a cultural norm that men (with penises) use men’s washrooms and women (with vaginas) use the women’s washroom.

UK’s travel warning has not one iota of rationality.


#16

No, they’re not apt. As well as the supposed threats from facebook, You think a facebook post justifies the UK to issue travel warning? Give me a break …


#17

True, but both actions come from the same PC nature that is a stable of modernism.

Banning Savage is pretty pathetic because he doesn’t present a threat to the people of the UK. He has political views that many would deem insufferable but to go as far as banning? Talk about overreacting on in international scale.

Whatever the rights of free speech Mark Savage has, he has more or less nothing useful to contribute to anything; if him airing his pretty revolting views is so important for Americans, he can stay there.

Whether or not his views contribute anything to the US or abroad is irrelevant because the basis of his banning stands on nothing more than political correctness. He isn’t the reincarnated first president of the KKK or Adolf Hilter planning to bomb the continent.

Trump isn’t and won’t be banned; there was a petition that reached the threshold for a parliamentary debate under an absurd system we have recently attained whereby any public petition to Parliament that reaches 100,000 signatures can be debated (if a committee decides it’s appropriate). In any case it’s quite clear that Trump believes nothing that comes out of his own mouth except statements about his own greatness, so he’s hardly a security threat.

The fact that people want to ban Trump - and the petition garnered a lot of signatures - is my point. It’s ridiculous.


#18

This pretty much the common thought I’ve come across as well, but many were also fascinated by the southern states at the same time. Many in the states not living in said region also held similar views - that it was a place crawling with racists, guns and the next Matt Shepard case was just around the corner.


#19

I think you’ve got this wrong.

I never stated or implied that the FCO was talking about “the South” in particular.

Your perception that foreigners consider the South to epitomize everything that’s wrong about the U.S. also misses the mark. It’s untrue.

It’s patently false though to say that the South is viewed uniformly in a negative light abroad.

But I never stated my perception. I stated my interactions with another person on what he said.

A lot of the popular culture streaming from America over the years has actually given foreigners a very positive, romanticized account of Southern culture. The stunning but feisty Scarlet O’Hara from Gone with the Wind, the idyllic Waltons with “Goodnight John Boy”, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, the wealthy decadence of ‘Dallas’ etc.

These shows have created the common idea abroad, at least in Britain, that Southerners have uncommonly good, gentlemanly manners and hospitality - epitomized in the phrase, “Yes ma’am”. Southern men are seen as laid-back, hospitable, happy and carefree dudes. The ladies are inevitably pretty with a winning smile, flirtatious personality and an unforgettably sassy drawl.

Interestingly, the South is seen paradoxically: intensely innocent and family-friendly but the popular image also happens to be one of bodice-ripping passion.

Warm, sweaty bodies and hot heads in a hot climate equals strapping men in butternut uniforms storming Union trenches and beautiful Southern belles (usually understood to be blondes, of course) with elaborate dresses living in huge white ranches - and fluttering their eyelashes, of course. Well, that was my mother’s and grandmothers image of it anyway in their youth - so much so that my mom still retains a not so secret desire to live on a ranch with horses :rolleyes: If you consider the cold, northern climes of my home country you might understand why a girl from here might fantasize about such a scenario. She also notes frequently - and with approval - how “well-mannered” Southern males are. So as you can see, heavily romanticized and idealised.

And then, of course, there’s the irresistible charm of country music and blues. Elvis Presley - needs no introduction.

All well and good.

Then again, we do also have the “hillbilly” image - which can be a bit of a caricature. And we’re not unaware of antebellum slavery, Jim Crow and the KKK - but every society has its darker side. So the South is definitely both idealised and caricatured.

I’ve found this stereotype runs more amongst Americans.


#20

That’s what I meant to write.


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