“unapproved” medicines...morality of use


#1

Is using “unapproved” medicine (especially medical cannabis but really any unapproved medicine) a sin when used to treat a valid medical condition?

Reason I ask: Medical cannabis is totally ILLEGAL in my state. My friend with glaucoma uses it regularly and illegally. She says nothing else works, and would be blind by now without it. She has tried every legal option, and they did NOT work.

If a sin, mortal or venial?

Serious replies only, please.


#2

No, it is not a sin, either major or minor!!!I think that using medical grade cannabis for glaucoma or to help the effects of chemotherapy or chronic pain is just fine. I’m lucky and live in a state where it is legal if you obtain a physicians referral and recommendation.:shrug:


#3

I’m wondering about the sinfullness when in a state/country where it is** illegal**, and especially when other medical treatment options are not as good, such as with my friend who has glaucoma.

So, essence, I am asking if it is sinful to use an illegal treatment option for treating a disease/medical condition, when the legal options just don’t work.


#4

NO, it is not sinful to take care of your body so that you are able to function, even if the treatment us illegal in your county/state. The Feds are turning a blind eye to medical marijuana usage because it is a total waste of their time and money to go after sick people who use the substance. Eventually Medical Cannabis will be allowed everywhere except maybe in the Deep South. Please just support your friend and don’t worry about sinning:)


#5

Thank you for providing me a definitive answer to an issue that a was very uncertain about.


#6

Do you have any reference to back up your opinion?

Or is this simply your opinion?


#7

I did watch the CNN report on cannibis and after seeing the effect on the little girl who was having seizures I can’t imagine why people would not want to make it available to these people - not to mention the other benifits it has for the other people shown.

Its the question of recreational use that is the problem and unfortunately holds back the treatment for these people for the time being.

It will be legalized because of the huge amount of profit that can be made and the tax revenues that can be made which will be more important unfortunately than treating people - Goverments love vices easpecially here in Canada - when they see the potential profit every Goverment will be on board its just a matter of time - I wouldn’t be suprised to see the cigarette companys jump on it with losing smokers everyday - money talks in this world.
Money is as big an addiction as any drug and people just can’t say no to it.

I’m all for the treatment of the people who need it - and they do need it.
It isn’t anymore dangerous than alcohol - I would say less - we have alcohol and tabbaco and it treats absolutly nothing.

The gateway drugs are alcohol and cigarette - they lead you to all others and people should admit it.

I personally will not use it (I have used it).If I am following Christ I know the truth he would tell me not to use it recreationally. Stay sober.

Just my opinion and there will be many from all direction - my opinion is for me only what others do is their choice.Stand before the holy sacrament and ask Jesus what you should do.


#8

Actually, I’ve known quite a few people who smoked marijuana but did not drink or use tobacco. In fact, I received several lectures from people I knew to use the drug for smoking cigarettes.


#9

What you say is indeed true but the majority of us start with Tabacco and alcohol.


#10

I would amend that to say “started”, or at least the trend is moving that direction. Cigarettes are on their way out, but marijuana is trying to bust through the door.


#11

Well, the reference to back it up would come from when it is permissible to disobey laws from legitimate authority. It is just to disobey such laws when the laws themselves are unjust. I assume the reasoning is that if medical marijuana is truly being used as medicine and is the only type of medicine that works to help with a legitimate medical condition then of course it is unjust to make it illegal to use. Morphine is also a pretty powerful drug, but sometimes people truly need it for medical reasons, it is unjust for a country to outlaw legitimate medical treatments, and so it is not sinful to disobey those unjust laws and use the medicines anyway. Another way to put it, what if you lived in a country where all medical treatment of diabetes was illegal. In such a country would it be sinful to ignore the laws and obtain the medical treatment you needed anyway? Of course not, laws outlawing legitimate medical treatments are unjust. Now, of course, this argument rests on the assumption that there are legitimate medical uses for marijuana. I don’t personally know enough about this to argue one way or the other, but have heard of a few stories which incline me to believe it does have legitimate medical uses, and so, that the law banning its medical use is unjust.


#12

Absolutely NOT! Gods law trumps mans law everytime.

Ive seen a few people in my state last week that went to DC and spoke in front of a committee of senators about medical marijuana and them using and accessing it for their sick children, when nothing else has worked, most of the senators told these parents to do what they needed to do to make their children well, a few went as far to say if law enforcement tried to harass them about this, to call the senator and he would represent them in court!!!

The real enemy in this is law enforcement,they seem to want any and all uses for any kind of illegal substance to be an arrestable offense, the more I think about, it actually sickens me, they care more about arresting someone versus saving a childs life, but that is the world we live in, so I guess I should be not be so surprised.

Plus law enforcement should actually not even have an opinion about such things, their job is to serve and protect the public, not to give their views on what SHOULD be law or what laws should remain or change.


#13

Which means, as of right now, it comes down to personal opinion, rather than a definitive answer.


#14

Everyone is allowed an opinion, no one is required to turn off their brain when they become a cop. That said, law enforcement can not decide how to do their job based on their opinion of the law. In fact, arresting people using illegal drugs is correct *according to the law. * Ignoring the law would be a problem.

In addition, law enforcement is under no obligation to protect anyone.


#15

While I am not a glaucoma expert, I do believe that my friend is truthful about finding genuine relief from (illegally obtained) cannabis.

I do NOT believe that, for my friend, cannabis use is just an excuse to get stoned.


#16

Well, that depends on what you mean. If there are legitimate medical uses then it is unjust to make these medical uses illegal. Whether or not legitimate medical uses exist is a fact, there either are or there aren’t. I personally am not taking a definitive stand on one side or the other because I personally do not have the knowledge to determine whether or not legitimate medical uses exist. However, just because I personally do not have that knowledge doesn’t mean a definitive answer does not exist. If legitimate medical uses exist then it is immoral and unjust to have them be illegal and it is perfectly moral and just to use them even though they are illegal.


#17

Thank you. You all have been very helpful in clarifying. Prior to reading all your responses, I feared that even if a person found great relief from cannabis (or any other illegal remedy), it would be a sin just because it was** illegal**, and that the CATHOLIC thing to do under those circumstances would be to suffer (if legal means didn’t help), and “offer it up.”


#18

I am sure you didn’t mean to say one thing then another.

But in your first post you referenced “the reasoning is that if medical marijuana is truly being used as medicine and is** the only type of medicine that works** to help with a legitimate medical condition.” Then you simply say, a legitimate medicine.

Sorry to me those are two completely different things.

I have Lupus. Lupus causes joint pain. There are a number of medications that I can take for joint pain. Motrin, Celebrex, and Hydrocodone, just to name a few. But I can’t buy morphine. Why not? It would work. And since it is a legitimate medicine, if I get it from the black market, it isn’t a sin, right? The same with any illegal drug that I can find that might help.

Now, before anyone jumps on me saying that pot isn’t the same as other illegal drugs let me say. I don’t care if you smoke yourself into a totally drugged state. All I ask is that if you plow your car into something, it is a tree and not a school bus. And if you take a dive off of a building, make sure no one is below you.


#19

Honestly, I don’t really see that as being different. Morphine is not a legitimate medicine for your particular case as there are other less extreme alternatives available that work for you. I also don’t really see that it has anything to do with the question at hand, which is whether or not it is immoral to use an illegal substance for medicinal purposes.


#20

Sorry, I read it as unapproved medicines.

Maybe the OP can ask the mod to change the title of the thread.


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