Unclean Animals?


#1

“It came to pass also, that seven brethren, together with their mother, were apprehended, and compelled by the king to eat swine’s flesh against the law, for which end they were tormented with whips and scourges.” 2 Maccabees 7:1

The Maccabees died rather than eat swine meat. What is/was the purpose of the dietary laws about clean/unclean animals? (I’m partial too Honey Baked Ham and Bacon):crying:


#2

The Levitical Law doesn’t apply to those who accept the freedom in Christ just as Paul said. So don’t worry :smiley:


#3

I’ve been vegan 20 years and I think all life reflects the glory of God
so I don’t eat any meat at all.

I never felt cleaner than when I became vegan and now you can get everything
ice cream, sausages, meat substitutes, vegan cheese, anything has a vegan version :slight_smile:

all without causing any suffering in the world.

But this is beyond church teaching.

God bless you! +


#4

I personally reckon that if 'fridges and freezers and canning existed at the time of Moses, that Jewish dietry habits would have been less restricted. Things like ‘bloody’ meat and pork go off/spoil quickly in the hotter climates.

Life was seen in a holistic way, much moreso than today, that included religion and general health.


#5

I recall reading that it was to isolate the Jews from the sacrificial meals of their neighbors, which would lead to their worshiping false gods. I don’t recall the source for that, but think it was at least one intent of the rule.


#6

The short answer to why Jews observe these laws is: because the Torah says so. The Torah does not specify any reason for these laws, and for a Torah-observant, traditional Jew, there is no need for any other reason. Some have suggested that the laws of kashrut fall into the category of “chukkim,” laws for which there is no reason. We show our obedience to G-d by following these laws even though we do not know the reason. Others, however, have tried to ascertain G-d’s reason for imposing these laws.

In his book “To Be a Jew” (an excellent resource on traditional Judaism), Rabbi Hayim Halevy Donin suggests that the dietary laws are designed as a call to holiness. The ability to distinguish between right and wrong, good and evil, pure and defiled, the sacred and the profane, is very important in Judaism. Imposing rules on what you can and cannot eat ingrains that kind of self control, requiring us to learn to control even our most basic, primal instincts.

(jewfaq.org/kashrut.htm)

The Jewish people have a mission of Tikkun Olam, repairing the world. A special diet reminds us of our mission and keeps us together as a people to fulfill it. (Intermarriage is kind of hard when you have to take your non-Jewish date to a kosher restaurant, or if you go to a prospective mother-in-law’s home and you won’t eat her food…) Keeping kosher is also a reminder of gratitude to the Almighty for taking the Jewish people out of Egypt, and a symbol of the holy covenant. (see Leviticus 11:45-47)

(judaism.about.com/library/3_askrabbi_o/bl_simmons_kosherwhy.htm)


#7

From the Jewish perspective on the kosher laws:

The Torah does not specify any reason for these laws, and for a Torah-observant, traditional Jew, there is no need for any other reason. Some have suggested that the laws of kashrut fall into the category of “chukkim,” laws for which there is no reason. We show our obedience to G-d by following these laws even though we do not know the reason. Others, however, have tried to ascertain G-d’s reason for imposing these laws. Rabbi Hayim Halevy Donin suggests that the dietary laws are designed as a call to holiness. The ability to distinguish between right and wrong, good and evil, pure and defiled, the sacred and the profane, is very important in Judaism. Imposing rules on what you can and cannot eat ingrains that kind of self control, requiring us to learn to control even our most basic, primal instincts.

(jewfaq.org/kashrut.htm)

The Jewish people have a mission of repairing the world. A special diet reminds us of our mission and keeps us together as a people to fulfill it. (Intermarriage is kind of hard when you have to take your non-Jewish date to a kosher restaurant, or if you go to a prospective mother-in-law’s home and you won’t eat her food…) Keeping kosher is also a reminder of gratitude to the Almighty for taking the Jewish people out of Egypt, and a symbol of the holy covenant.

(judaism.about.com/library/3_askrabbi_o/bl_simmons_kosherwhy.htm)


#8

From my understanding Jewish law not only permits, but requires Jews to violate most commandments (incluidng kosher laws) in life-threatening situations:

The Babylonian Talmud, Chapter 82a of Tractate Yoma mentions pregnancy cravings for non-kosher food (the passage discusses a pregnant woman who craves pork on Yom Kippur) as the paradigmatic example of a presumed life-threatening situation where a person is allowed to eat non-kosher food (and is permitted to eat it on Yom Kippur).

(en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pikuach_nefesh)

In this view, the martyrs would have been forbidden to resist the king’s decree merely to avoid eating pork. However there are a few exceptions to the aforementioned principle:

There is a famous example that can be found in the Babylonian Talmud Gittin 57b, the apocryphal II Maccabees 7, and other sources about Hannah and her seven sons, a story associated with the holiday of Hanukkah. Rather than eat pork, Hannah defies King Antiochus IV and allows her sons to be killed one by one before she herself dies.

However this story relates another exception where Halakha requires that one surrender their life. A situation where a person is forced to break a law simply for the sake of desecrating the Torah. If a non-Jewish ruler demands that a Jew cook food for him on the Sabbath, the Jew is required to desecrate the Sabbath rather than let himself be killed. However if the ruler demands the Jew cook food on the Sabbath, not for the ruler’s benefit but simply for the sake of dishonoring the Torah, then one is required to surrender their life to avoid desecrating God’s name (akin to idolatry). Hannah and her sons acted in this way when it came it eating pork for the sake of desecrating the Torah, by allowing themselves to be killed they sanctified God’s name in public.

(en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-sacrifice_in_Jewish_law#Idolatry)


#9

On a side note, the Holy Maccabean Martyrs (woman and her seven sons) are Catholic Saints. August 1st is their feast day. :slight_smile:


#10

If we celebrate their feast day on the liturgical calendar, are we obligated to believe this was a true event? I’ve heard some scholars debate this as fiction with great theological virtues…


#11

[quote="Augustine3, post:10, topic:326932"]
If we celebrate their feast day on the liturgical calendar, are we obligated to believe this was a true event? I’ve heard some scholars debate this as fiction with great theological virtues....

[/quote]

They are Saints of the Church. :)


#12

I take that as a yes we are obligated to believe it was a real event? :smiley:


#13

[quote="Augustine3, post:12, topic:326932"]
I take that as a yes we are obligated to believe it was a real event? :D

[/quote]

I am sure that others will say otherwise but, yes, it has to be real if they are saints praying for us in heaven. :)


#14
 I Believe it was also for Health reasons...  pigs have always till recent times been unclean animals .... because of everything they eat.... now pigs are feed grain etc, and don't munch away on there own dead Carcasses which were disease ridden ....

#15

[quote="Zekariya, post:13, topic:326932"]
I am sure that others will say otherwise but, yes, it has to be real if they are saints praying for us in heaven. :)

[/quote]

Actually that makes sense. How are we supposed to honour their liturgical feast and pray for their intercession if they are fictional.

Cheers mate :thumbsup:


#16

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