uncomfirmed catholic recieving communion


#1

Can a unconfirmed catholic go to confession and receive communion?


#2

Yes. I do all the time :slight_smile:


#3

[quote=openmind]Can a unconfirmed catholic go to confession and receive communion?
[/quote]

In the RC tradition yes, one can go to Confession and receive Holy Communion prior to receiving the sacrament of Confirmation.


#4

[quote=openmind]Can a unconfirmed catholic go to confession and receive communion?
[/quote]

Yes. Some Dioceses(?) give the Sacraments in the order of Baptism, Reconciliation, Communion, and then Confirmation. Up until a few years ago, our Diocese was like that and then it changed to where the children receive their confirmation with their first communion.


#5

In fact most cradle catholics (as I am) receive the sacraments in the order of Baptism, Confession, Holy Communion and THEN Confirmation - at least they do here in the merry old land of Oz - maybe it’s just you weirdo Yanks who don’t :smiley:


#6

[quote=rosarywarrior]Yes. Some Dioceses(?) give the Sacraments in the order of Baptism, Reconciliation, Communion, and then Confirmation.
[/quote]

I always had the impression that was the normal order.

[QUOTE0Up until a few years ago, our Diocese was like that and then it changed to where the children receive their confirmation with their first communion.
[/QUOTE]

Isn’t that awfully young for Confirmation? I was confirmed when I was twelve and I’ve wished I had been older so I could have appreciated the meaning of it better.
Also, doen’t doing 1st Communion & Confrimation at the same time delay 1st Communion until your Bishop is available?


#7

the original order of the sacraments is baptism, confirmation, first communion, all administered at the time of initiation into the Church, whether as an infant, child or adult. This is the practice retained in most of the Eastern churches. It is the hope of many that the restored RCIA will lead us to a return to this theologically sound practice and eliminate the artificial separation of baptism and confirmation.

Several dioceses in US have been given permission to experiment with Confirmation before or at the same time as First Communion. the age in this country for confirmation is anywhere between 7 and 16. Every diocese can give reasons for the age specified by the bishop. Youngstown recently changed from 11th to 8th grade, another diocese in Ind. recently changed from 8th to 11th, both published justification for the changes.

The proper age for confirmation is the age specified by the bishop of the diocese because his is the perogative to call the baptized to confirmation.

Those who have reached the age of discretion (usually age 7) must be given the preparation and opportunity for confession before 1st communion and Confirmation (whichever comes first). The unbaptized, who receive all 3 sacraments at Easter, are prepared for their first confession sometime after Easter during the mystagogia period.


#8

Confirmation has been given at various ages, including infancy. In the Orthodox Churhes, infants are baptized, confirmed and recieve first communion all at once.

Some would argue that from at least a partial historical perspcetive, 7 is kind of old to be receiving confirmation.

I was married in the Catholic church without being confirmed. The bishop I spoke to about it allowed it. (Our converstation went like: Dad not Catholic, Mom got mad at church when 4, started to go again when 15, favorite priest was found to be a homosexual abuser, blamed God, left. I am not going to church currently, have no plans to, but for some reason, I really don’t know why, I don’t feel I will be married unless it is by a priest. Ahh the leading of the Holy Spirit even when we cannot identify it!)

I finally was confirmed at age 38 a few years ago.

But the point is that a person can even be married in the Catholic Church without being confirmed.

God Bless,
Maria

Ahh, I see PuzzleAnnie posted while I had to be away. sorry for the repeat. I acutally did read everyones responses:)


#9

The reason for the separation between First Communion and Confirmation is mostly tradition (small “t” tradition), and goes back to the delay that was usually the result of having to wait for the Bishop in the days before travel was convenient. This tradition was somehow retained, however as other posters have pointed out, there is reason to think that maybe the move will be toward a more traditional (again small “t”) approach to the sacraments of initiation, such as the practices the Eastern Rites have always retained. All of that being said, in regard to the OP, yes it is perfectly acceptable to receive both Reconciliation and the Eucharist without having received Confirmation. (If you don’t believe me then you can just ask my 8 year old daughter.)


#10

[quote=LilyM]In fact most cradle catholics (as I am) receive the sacraments in the order of Baptism, Confession, Holy Communion and THEN Confirmation - at least they do here in the merry old land of Oz - maybe it’s just you weirdo Yanks who don’t :smiley:
[/quote]

Not anymore LilyM, my niece goes to a Catholic school and they follow the above, as I did when I was younger, but my niece’s best friend did her confirmation then holy communion 6 months later and its happening all over, my cousins had the same thing for their kids. Looks like we are becoming weird like the Yanks :smiley:


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