Unconfessed Sin


#1

I took this question from a quiz on a Calvinist Web Site in which 19 true or false statements are presented in what they call the “basic doctrine quiz.” I took the liberty of cutting and pasting the twelfth one from their web site along with their answer. I would like to get all who are interested to counter the answer as best they can. Here it is:

  1. If I die with unconfessed sin, I will not go to heaven.

A. FALSE. This is a Roman Catholic belief from which the doctrine of last rites, and purgatory stem. Protestants, however, have objected to this idea because of the nature of the work of Christ as revealed in the Scriptures. For those in Christ, all sins have been forgiven, past, present, and future (Heb 10:10-14; Rom 8:1, 29-39). Not only that, but those who trust in Christ are also seen as perfectly righteous in the sight of God because of Christ’s own righteousness and conformity to the law (Rom 5:19). And Christ also intercedes for us when we do sin (1 Jn 2:1-2).


#2

I’m going to take a shot at this, although I am not an apologist.Seems to me, that the Calvinists want to blame Catholics for every malady under the sun. Basically, the answer they give is incorrect. If a Catholic,(or any other person) dies in a state of mortal sin,they are denied Heaven. If a Catholic committed a mortal sin,repented of it,asked Our Lord for forgiveness, then died without going to Confession, or receiving Last Rites,that person would not lose his salvation. I assume here, that the person intended to go to Confession, but died before he could recieve the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Okay, apologists, help me out here. Add any commentary you feel is needed.


#3

I do not think this is a question that can be answered either way. As a follower of Christ, I believe that God alone knows our hearts and minds; knows us. If we die with unconfessed sin, it may not be a matter of whether we’re going to heaven or hell, but rather, a matter of what kind of God ours is.

The Bible tells us that He is fair, and just, but also that God is merciful. Therefore, it seems to me that if we know God through Christ, we are forever able to trust that although He is a just God, and a holy one, He will be forever “slow to anger and steadfast to endure” for us. If we are honest people who truly seek God and want to be with Him, then I believe with all my heart that we have nothing to fear from our Creator, who made and knows the ways and intentions of every human.


#4

Yes, our God is a Just God! But by committing a mortal sin, we have willingly turned our back on our Father and His Love. This puts our soul at risk of going to hell.

The Catholic Church teaches that to return our soul to a state of grace, we need to go to confession, for our priest have the God given authority to forgive our sins in the name of Jesus Christ. This comes right out of the bible, which is good enough for me.

As far as PhilipCal’s assertion that they intended to go to confession, who knows. I just know that if I were in a state of mortal sin, I wouldn’t want to waste too many chances to go to confession and restore myself in God’s graces! Amen!

Notworthy


#5

Wow, I guess you learn something new every day. I never saw in the Bible where it states “in order to return our soul to a state of grace you have to go to Confession to a priest” for the absolution of sins. Can you please refer me to Book, chapter, and verse? I’m really interested in seeing this. Thanks.

Mike


#6

[quote=mhansen]Wow, I guess you learn something new every day. I never saw in the Bible where it states “in order to return our soul to a state of grace you have to go to Confession to a priest” for the absolution of sins. Can you please refer me to Book, chapter, and verse? I’m really interested in seeing this. Thanks.
Mike
[/quote]

Hi Mike-

You have misunderstood NotWorthys comment I believe, partially due to grammar- I reposted it below

It probably should have been written like this:
"The Church teaches that to return our soul to a state of grace (from a mortal sin) we need to go to confession with a priest. This is because our priests have the the God-given authority to forgive our sins in the name of Jesus Christ - this comes right out of the bible which is good enough for me."
I believe the bolded part is what he meant to say was “right out of the bible”. The verses most directly implicating the god-given authority to effect God’s forgiveness of sin (or not!) comes from…John 20:23 and Matthew 18:18.
If you want a more comprehensive treatment of the subject you should go here:
catholic.com/library/Forgiveness_of_Sins.asp

Hope that helps-

Phil


#7

i can add something to this as well:

i am a paramedic. often times, especially at multiple casualty accidents, caused by drunk drivers, things get very very hectic. sometimes we swear, can be short ect.

assume i climb down and embankment and pull a person from a burning car. during the rescue, i get hurt/burned, or am just plain physically taxed so i swear or think something not so nice (like how id love to have a few minutes alone with the drunk driver that caused this). the car then blows up, and i am killed, but the other person is saved.

now, do i go to Hell because of natural, error prone human reactions to stress, or would God understand that i am not Perfect, and i tried my best? Does God understand that even though i didnt have perfect actions at the time, my overall intent was on saving human life? i think probably so.

my brother is in his second tour fighting in Iraq, and i am sure that he isnt so nice and cozy all the time. i highly doubt he would be thinking of pure and perfect actions while under fire. i think that if he tries to do what is right, and accepts Jesus, that moments before he might die fighting in combat will not be looked upon so harshly.


#8

[quote=Philthy]Hi Mike-

You have misunderstood NotWorthys comment I believe, partially due to grammar- I reposted it below

It probably should have been written like this:
"The Church teaches that to return our soul to a state of grace (from a mortal sin) we need to go to confession with a priest. This is because our priests have the the God-given authority to forgive our sins in the name of Jesus Christ - this comes right out of the bible which is good enough for me."
I believe the bolded part is what he meant to say was “right out of the bible”. The verses most directly implicating the god-given authority to effect God’s forgiveness of sin (or not!) comes from…John 20:23 and Matthew 18:18.
If you want a more comprehensive treatment of the subject you should go here:
catholic.com/library/Forgiveness_of_Sins.asp

Hope that helps-

Phil

[/quote]

Bingo!

Thanks for the clarification. It’s all clear in my head, it just doesn’t always make it through my fingers to the keyboard!

Thanks again!

NotWorthy


#9

[quote=BioCatholic]i can add something to this as well:

i am a paramedic. often times, especially at multiple casualty accidents, caused by drunk drivers, things get very very hectic. sometimes we swear, can be short ect.

assume i climb down and embankment and pull a person from a burning car. during the rescue, i get hurt/burned, or am just plain physically taxed so i swear or think something not so nice (like how id love to have a few minutes alone with the drunk driver that caused this). the car then blows up, and i am killed, but the other person is saved.

now, do i go to Hell because of natural, error prone human reactions to stress, or would God understand that i am not Perfect, and i tried my best? Does God understand that even though i didnt have perfect actions at the time, my overall intent was on saving human life? i think probably so.

my brother is in his second tour fighting in Iraq, and i am sure that he isnt so nice and cozy all the time. i highly doubt he would be thinking of pure and perfect actions while under fire. i think that if he tries to do what is right, and accepts Jesus, that moments before he might die fighting in combat will not be looked upon so harshly.
[/quote]

What you describe appears to be venial sin…if even that. Sin is most often in the will versus the thought. Also, no one can presume judgement on anyone…that’s God’s job, alone. We trust in Christ’s mercy, but we also understand our free will to turn away from Him. That turning away from God is what mortal sin really is. As is often the case with Protestant and (sigh) a lot of Catholics, there is a big misunderstanding of the Catholic teaching on forgiveness and this beautiful sacrament of reconcilliation.


#10

[quote=Philthy]Hi Mike-

You have misunderstood NotWorthys comment I believe, partially due to grammar- I reposted it below

It probably should have been written like this:
"The Church teaches that to return our soul to a state of grace (from a mortal sin) we need to go to confession with a priest. This is because our priests have the the God-given authority to forgive our sins in the name of Jesus Christ - this comes right out of the bible which is good enough for me."
I believe the bolded part is what he meant to say was “right out of the bible”. The verses most directly implicating the god-given authority to effect God’s forgiveness of sin (or not!) comes from…John 20:23 and Matthew 18:18.
If you want a more comprehensive treatment of the subject you should go here:
catholic.com/library/Forgiveness_of_Sins.asp

Hope that helps-

Phil

[/quote]

Thank you very much!

Mike


#11

[quote=vrummage]I took this question from a quiz on a Calvinist Web Site in which 19 true or false statements are presented in what they call the “basic doctrine quiz.” I took the liberty of cutting and pasting the twelfth one from their web site along with their answer. I would like to get all who are interested to counter the answer as best they can. Here it is:

  1. If I die with unconfessed sin, I will not go to heaven.

A. FALSE. This is a Roman Catholic belief from which the doctrine of last rites, and purgatory stem. Protestants, however, have objected to this idea because of the nature of the work of Christ as revealed in the Scriptures. For those in Christ, all sins have been forgiven, past, present, and future (Heb 10:10-14; Rom 8:1, 29-39). Not only that, but those who trust in Christ are also seen as perfectly righteous in the sight of God because of Christ’s own righteousness and conformity to the law (Rom 5:19). And Christ also intercedes for us when we do sin (1 Jn 2:1-2).

[/quote]

I’m like the other poster who said what’s in his brain doesn’t always make it through his fingers to the keyboard! I’ve got this whole scenario in my head about confession but I’m not sure it’ll come across the way I want - so here goes:

When reading the quote from the Calvanist website about their view of Christ’s sacrifice forgiving all our sins, past, present and future - I thought what an encapsulated view they have of the Sacrament of Reconciliation.

I would really like to believe that all my present sins are automatically forgiven without my acknowledging anything and that no matter what I do, my future sins are all taken care of too! WOW! But I just can’t believe this because it leaves out our cooperation or lack of it. Jesus’ sacrifice was not a magic wand that was waved over all mankind and “poof” every sin ever committed was forgiven with no regard for consequence. Ever heard the saying, “God helps those who help themselves?” This is sort of how I see confession. He has set up many “help” for us - His creation.

God has set up a way that I can knowingly improve myself to be more like He intended me to be. Non-Catholics think that Catholics think we have a free pass with confession: Do something wrong and run to the priest, get absolution and then go back out and live like you did before. The Sacrament of Reconciliation is just one in a series of ways that we can be close / or get closer to God. This sacrament is not a sacrament unto itself.

A Catholic’s faith journey begins at Baptism and continues through his entire life with multiple times (even daily) to receive God’s sanctifying grace. This grace, throughout our lives, gives us what we need to hopefully steer clear of temptation. That’s what grace is meant for. The more we are able to fight temptation and sin, the more we conform our lives to that of Christ. The more “Christ-like” we are the better the chance we have of living eternally with God.

It is OUR CHOICE - whether we want to cooperate with the grace God gives us or not! It’s more than just believing in Christ’s sacrifice. If we chose not to accept or cooperate with this grace, well… you know what happens! The point of confession is to, of course, confess the offenses against God but you are also supposed to change your life everytime you leave that confessional! You don’t go back out and just willy nilly commit the same sins all over again just intending to go run to the priest over and over again. No, you CHANGE your mindset and your life to conform to that of Christ - you must intend NOT to keep committing the same sins over and over again. IF you do fall, after trying really had not to, you go to confession and receive more grace to make you stronger, reconcile yourself to God, mend the split. It’s a journey, it’s a progression to sanctity of ourselves for an entire lifetime.

I suppose its a “big picture” thing I’m going for here whereas, non-Catholics see just the “event” itself and don’t realize what the event means to the “big picture” where our lives are concerned; they tend to compartmentalize theses events as having no real effect where Christ is concerned. They think it’s all so unnecessary. When they say that, I think, “Wow, then what was all that that Jesus did while He was here? Was it all for show - His Baptism, the Eucharist, giving the Apostles power, etc. - it all meant nothing?”

They just can’t believe that God would use us humans to bring His grace to fellow humans; that He would use everyday things to impart that grace; that He is not a God who is set high above us without interactig with us as He did in the beginning. Their relationship must be purely vertical. What a shame they are missing out on everything He intended for us to have and use to get back to Him! Everything in the New Testament is a fulfillment of the Old.

Long winded, I know, and I’m still not sure my point was brought over, anyway…


#12

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