Unconscious while receiving last rites


#1

Does the sacrament of last rites have full effect if you are unconscious when you receive it? I’ve had 2 relatives who were unconscious who received the last rites while in that state and then died. Can the sacrament received in this way absolve someone of all their sins? Thank you.


#2

Hi,

This is from the Catechism-

1532 The special grace of the sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick has as its effects:

  • the uniting of the sick person to the passion of Christ, for his own good and that of the whole Church;
  • the strengthening, peace, and courage to endure in a Christian manner the sufferings of illness or old age;
  • the forgiveness of sins, if the sick person was not able to obtain it through the sacrament of Penance;
  • the restoration of health, if it is conducive to the salvation of his soul;
  • the preparation for passing over to eternal life.

Star


#3

[quote=Happy2bcatholic]Does the sacrament of last rites have full effect if you are unconscious when you receive it? I’ve had 2 relatives who were unconscious who received the last rites while in that state and then died. Can the sacrament received in this way absolve someone of all their sins? Thank you.
[/quote]

There may be some confusion here.

“Last Rites” is the reception of three separate Sacraments, Reconciliation, Anointing of the sick, Holy Communion and an Apostolic Blessing.

A Person cannot receive “Last Rites” while unconscious.

An unconscious person can not receive the Sacrament of Reconciliation, or Holy Communion.

An unconscious person can however receive the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick, which also forgives the sin of those who do not have the ability to Confess their sins, such as being unconscious. They can also receive the Apostolic Blessing which has a Plenary Indulgence attached.


#4

Just to add the mention of canon1006 which provides the anointing of a person no longer in control of his or her faculties (which would include those not lucid and those who are not conscious) under this condition: This sacrament is to be conferred upon sick persons who requested it at least implicitly when they were in control of their faculties.


#5

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]An unconscious person can however receive the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick, which also forgives the sin of those who do not have the ability to Confess their sins, such as being unconscious. They can also receive the Apostolic Blessing which has a Plenary Indulgence attached.
[/quote]

So if a person receives the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick and an Apostolic Blessing while unconscious in a coma and they never come out of that coma, they would go straight to heaven since a Plenary Indulgence would remove all Temporal punishment?


#6

[quote=Sir Knight]So if a person receives the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick and an Apostolic Blessing while unconscious in a coma and they never come out of that coma, they would go straight to heaven since a Plenary Indulgence would remove all Temporal punishment?
[/quote]

The last judgement is still with God. Eventhough he recieved the Viaticum it doesnt mean that he will be goign straight to heaven. Why? We’ll what if though theAnointing of the sick forgave the sin, what if the person haven’t acknowledge his sin or even to the point of death don’t want to ask for forgiveness then he cannot go to heaven.


#7

[quote=viktor aleksndr]The last judgement is still with God. Eventhough he recieved the Viaticum it doesnt mean that he will be goign straight to heaven. Why? We’ll what if though theAnointing of the sick forgave the sin, what if the person haven’t acknowledge his sin or even to the point of death don’t want to ask for forgiveness then he cannot go to heaven.
[/quote]

Baptism takes away original sin and personal sin and if you die immediately after baptism you go straight to Heaven.

If someone is in a state of mortal sin but unconscious and unable to receive the Sacrament of Penance then the Annointing of the Sick forgives these sins. Whether that person goes straight to Heaven or does a spell in Purgatory doesn’t matter because at least they would be saved.


#8

[quote=Sir Knight]So if a person receives the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick and an Apostolic Blessing while unconscious in a coma and they never come out of that coma, they would go straight to heaven since a Plenary Indulgence would remove all Temporal punishment?
[/quote]

One would hope so.


#9

Even if its straight after baptism, or the annointing of the sick, if the person had an attachment to sin they would still probably make a trip through purgatory but they would eventually make it to heaven.


#10

[quote=gelsbern]Even if its straight after baptism, or the annointing of the sick, if the person had an attachment to sin they would still probably make a trip through purgatory but they would eventually make it to heaven.
[/quote]

Well that’s not what is taught. Father Corapi says that death immediately following baptism means straight to Heaven without going near Purgatory.
Annointing of the Sick I not so sure about but I believe its the same.


#11

An indulgence is only as good for efficatiousness as the one who is disposed to receiving it. If one is fully properly disposed, then it is plenary and that person could go straight to heaven. If, however, there is any impediment then the plenary offering is reduced to partial and the person would have some purgation remaining.


#12

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]There may be some confusion here.

“Last Rites” is the reception of three separate Sacraments, Reconciliation, Anointing of the sick, Holy Communion and an Apostolic Blessing.

A Person cannot receive “Last Rites” while unconscious.

An unconscious person can not receive the Sacrament of Reconciliation, or Holy Communion.

An unconscious person can however receive the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick, which also forgives the sin of those who do not have the ability to Confess their sins, such as being unconscious. They can also receive the Apostolic Blessing which has a Plenary Indulgence attached.
[/quote]

Would this also apply in an emergency? For instance, let’s say a person is mortally wounded by a car and is rendered either unconconscious, or conscious, but unable to speak due to injuries. A priest who just happens to be at the scene has no oil on his person and has no time to go get any because the victim will likely die before he returns. Can absolution still be given? Thanks


#13

Yes, absolution can certainly be given in emergencies without explicit confession, as long as it is probable that the person agrees, at least implicitly, to confess if they could and will when they can.


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