Understanding Mortal Sin

I am having a tough time discerning between mortal and venial sins, or whether I have committed a sin at all. This is mortal sin by definiton which i agree with:

1.Its subject must be a grave (or serious) matter.
2.It must be committed with full knowledge, both of the sin and of the gravity of the offense (no one is considered ignorant of the principles of the moral law, which are inborn as part of human knowledge, but these principles can be misunderstood in a particular context).
3.It must be committed with deliberate and complete consent, enough for it to have been a personal decision to commit the sin.

lets use examples:

Stealing:

lets say george is in a store and he sees something he wants… he knows in his mind that it is grave matter (thou shall not steal)… 2. he knows that it is with full knowledge, knows that it is sin and the graity will seperate him from god 3. he physically steals the object with complete consent , as a personal deciion

now my example:

I was pondering verses of the proverbs in relation to morality… and using the verses in the proverbs started thinking about something… then after that good thought i had a thought (im unsure if it was satan or me about someone)… then i dismissed all thoughts and now im here

surely i could not have committed a mortal sin? i dont know :frowning: … if i have committed a mortal sin i am scared that i can be seperated from god so easily without even wanting to

im bad at discerning

Theft may not be the best choice since the value has influence. For example, it is absolutely grave when the value is no longer petty theft (about $300 US) which varies by place and time.

First it is good to learn what the sins are, and about which are always grave and sometimes grave, and not grave. This will help with discerning.

Secondly one should always monitor thoughts and actions, and strive to do your duty so nothing will be omitted that would be a sin. This habit will help to avoid occasions of sin and also create an identifiable moment of decision. With an impulse, the thought or habitual act may be unthinking. Those, when bad, need to be broken.

Thirdly, the thought or action or omission, to be seriously sinful, meaning a break of charity towards God, is an act of will where one has a choice. If there is no choice, such as being forced, it makes a difference in culpability.

The Examination of Conscience is an aid to confession and describes sins against the 10 Commandments. It is a handy reference.

*" I was pondering verses of the proverbs in relation to morality… and using the verses in the proverbs started thinking about something… then after that good thought i had a thought (im unsure if it was satan or me about someone)… then i dismissed all thoughts and now im here

surely i could not have committed a mortal sin? i dont know … if i have committed a mortal sin i am scared that i can be seperated from god so easily without even wanting to

im bad at discerning*

Are you serious? You think a mind acting normally (focusing on one thing for a very long time without intrusive thoughts is almost impossible for the human brain) means you have committed a mortal sin??? And everyone should have nothing but “good thoughts” all day, every day, and even asleep at night? This sort of scrupulosity is, I think, what Jesus was angered by. He told us the “rules”, did He not? And, being Human, He also had “wandering thoughts” or He would not have been human! It’s stuff like this that drives people from the Church because no one can be perfect and if we have to walk around all day every day afraid, well, we know where fear COMES FROM, don’t we?

Though I do not believe there was a need for criticism or ridicule:nope: I do nonetheless believe this is a bit scrupulous and as we are all sinners and are not perfect we must realize that we will fall to sin at times and we must confess the mortal sins and preferably some or all of the venial sins and move on.

Here is an extensive(maybe too extensive) examination of conscience
followthissite.com/list-of-sins.php
Here is an article regarding scrupulosity
catholicspiritualdirection.org/scrupulosity.html

Here is an extensive(maybe too extensive) examination of conscience
followthissite.com/list-of-sins.php

Not a recommended site!

(I can understand how one can stumble across it and think – oh here is a list --but I would not recommend that site.)

From Compendium issued by Pope Benedict XVI

  1. When does one commit a mortal sin?

1855-1861
1874

One commits a mortal sin when there are simultaneously present: grave matter, full knowledge, and deliberate consent. This sin destroys charity in us, deprives us of sanctifying grace, and, if unrepented, leads us to the eternal death of hell. It can be forgiven in the ordinary way by means of the sacraments of Baptism and of Penance or Reconciliation.

  1. When does one commit a venial sin?

1862-1864
1875

One commits a venial sin, which is essentially different from a mortal sin, when the matter involved is less serious or, even if it is grave, when full knowledge or complete consent are absent. Venial sin does not break the covenant with God but it weakens charity and manifests a disordered affection for created goods. It impedes the progress of a soul in the exercise of the virtues and in the practice of moral good. It merits temporal punishment which purifies.

vatican.va/archive/compendium_ccc/documents/archive_2005_compendium-ccc_en.html

It can be helpful in forming ones conscience to have a regular confessor.

I do apologize and too do not recommend that site I had meant to link to a CAF thread.
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=397167

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