Unequally yoked and marriage


#1

If the 2 Corinthians 6:14 tells us not to be unequally yoked, why does the CC allow marriages between people who are Catholic and people who are not believers?


#2

There is a reason why dispensations are necessary when Catholics marry non-Catholics.


#3

When we got married, we used the passage from Hosea: an ox and *** should not be yoked together.

We used it for the two individual-my wife and I.

We did not see it as different faiths, but we need to love God and each other–then we would be walking together.

Just an idea.


#4

I think the question is more about why marriages between Catholics and non-Christians, such as atheist, agnostic, buddhist, etc., are allowed. OP, am I correct in this assumption?


#5

AFAIK non-believers are humans too, as in “created by God in His own image”. To be “unequally yoked” would mean to marry subhumans, monsters or inanimates. Besides, who can read consciences, to know for sure if a person (regardless of their official religion or lack thereof) is a believer or a non-believer?


#6

[quote="vames, post:5, topic:310956"]
AFAIK non-believers are humans too, as in "created by God in His own image". To be "unequally yoked" would mean to marry subhumans, monsters or inanimates. Besides, who can read consciences, to know for sure if a person (regardless of their official religion or lack thereof) is a believer or a non-believer?

[/quote]

No, that is not what that Scripture passage means at all. It clearly says "a believer and an unbeliever." Not "a human and an animal."

:rolleyes:

Most people can tell if someone is not a believer. It's borne out by the fruits of their actions.

Not marrying an unbeliever does not mean we are judging them not to be human. It just causes problems. Many and difficult problems.


#7

The Church does not encourage such marriages, in fact. If a Catholic goes through pre-Cana, there will be many concerns about the marriage, but if the two people insist, they MAY be able to get permission to marry in the Church. Still doesn’t make it advisable, but it happens.


#8

yes :thumbsup:


#9

What is this bit about dispensations then? I am unfamiliar with it…

I know the Church has the authority of Christ, but how can it “make an exception to the rule”? Because that’s how dispensations are coming across to me.


#10

uhm I don’t think it is a “law” forbidding it. Look at it this way the dispensation let’s the person know that the Church is forewarning him or her of the potential error that person is entertaining to embark upon.
She does not outright forbids it because She recognizes that perhaps the umbelieving spouse might come to the truth and though She has faith the Catholic spouse will try it’s best to accomplish this, She also recognizes the perill of loosing one of Her sheep instead.


#11

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