Uninspired books of the bible, which the councils rejected

Hello, I seemed to have forgotten what these books were called. They included Enoch and many others, which the councils rejected for being non-scholarly, and pagan rooted. Could you please comment to me what these books are referred to as? I can’t seem to find any Catholic resources searching the terms “uninspired books” and I know there is another name for them! I’m having a brain fart!
Thank you

Do you mean apocrypha?
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01601a.htm

2 Likes

@NJada YES! Thank you! Gnostic gospels/Apocrypha, thank you so much:)!

1 Like

Non-canonical? Non-canonical sayings gospel?

@Loud-living-dogma
Good afternoon! Are you asking? Looks like it. https://www.catholic.com/qa/why-isnt-the-gospel-of-thomas-in-the-bible There are many of these gnostic types seemingly :open_mouth:

1 Like

There are, I think, about 40 known “gospels.” You may recall a few years ago, a copy of the “Gospel” of Judas was found.

1 Like

1 Enoch is technically pseudoepigraphical (falsely authored). Also, I believe what we would call “Ezra & Nehemiah” were called “1 Esdras” in the fourth century councils, but I believe they also included “2 Esdras” which were the “additions” to Esdras, which are not in Bibles today.

Gnostic Gospels

1 Like

With regard to New Testament:

http://www.ntcanon.org/table.shtml

1 Like

Try searching ‘Pseudepigrapha’. They include infancy gospels, life stories of Mary, and some are obviously wrong! There are stories of things like the child Jesus transforming Egyptian children into goats (because they wouldn’t play with him), talking back to Joseph for trying to teach him to read, and stories of the ‘lost’ years. Almost all pertain to miracles and hidden knowledge belonging to Him, when the Bible clearly states that His first miracle was turning water into wine, at the wedding in Cana.

While some of these stories can be entertaining, or even instructive or inspirational, one should read them, if they choose, keeping in mind that they are not accepted by the Church, and are not to replace the Bible and church teachings.

One more thing…there seem to be at least three ‘Gospels of Thomas’. I haven’t read them in a while, but one is an infancy gospel, and one is clearly gnostic (claiming knowledge of hidden truths),. The third (that I know about) comes pretty close to the other Gospels. Just thought I’d share, now that the subject has been brought up!

I remember reading a Gospel of Thomas. It was pretty much a list of 114 supposed sayings of Our Lord that some biblical scholars consider to be the Q source of the canonical Gospels. I thought it was a cool read. Wouldn’t incorporate any of it into my personal theology or spiritual practice.

Another apocrypha I liked was the Gospel of Mary Magdalene. If I remember it right, this text told an account of Saint Mary Magdalene being told something’s by Jesus and then she shared some of it with the Apostles. Another cool read; although it sounded very Platonistic in tone.

I also like the Shepherd of Hermas. If I remember it right, it was a story of a shepherd and his visions. Another cool read.

This topic was automatically closed 14 days after the last reply. New replies are no longer allowed.

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.