Unworthy to be a Priest?


#1

I want to be a priest. but have comitted sins (mostly sexual stuff; i.e., condoms, "internet temptations, and related sins").

am i unworthy to be a priest?


#2

[quote="4givemeasinner, post:1, topic:301417"]
I want to be a priest. but have comitted sins (mostly sexual stuff; i.e., condoms, "internet temptations, and related sins").

am i unworthy to be a priest?

[/quote]

Augustine became saint.....:thumbsup:


#3

[quote="4givemeasinner, post:1, topic:301417"]
I want to be a priest. but have comitted sins (mostly sexual stuff; i.e., condoms, "internet temptations, and related sins").

am i unworthy to be a priest?

[/quote]

Of course not. Please go to confession and talk to your spiritual director about your possible vocation. :) God bless you!


#4

The person who doesn't recognize themselves to be sinful in some way has no business being a priest. Will pray for your vocation!


#5

Remember -- NO ONE is 'worthy' of the priesthood (except Jesus). It's all a grace from God... ;)


#6

[quote="Gorgias, post:5, topic:301417"]
Remember -- NO ONE is 'worthy' of the priesthood (except Jesus). It's all a grace from God... ;)

[/quote]

This is true!! :)


#7

Before his conversion, Augustine was as dissolute as the worst of us today. God can forgive all sins.


#8

God doesn't call the qualified, he qualifies the called. You're in my prayers!

-ACEGC


#9

MAY THE SACRED HEART BLESS YOU!!

I will pray for you!!

Dont worry,I've also went there. The "unworthy" feeling. I've also commited sexual sins in my previous life, Dont give up!!

I will pray for your vocation, please Brother, Pray for mine, I am a sinner and need your prayers!!


#10

If God is calling you- you need to answer:thumbsup:


#11

[quote="4givemeasinner, post:1, topic:301417"]
I want to be a priest. but have comitted sins (mostly sexual stuff; i.e., condoms, "internet temptations, and related sins").

am i unworthy to be a priest?

[/quote]

Like many, I can relate to this feeling.

First: you are a priest. :confused: I am referring to the common priesthood of all the baptized. It suddenly ceases to be a matter of how worthy we are: it is by God's merit and because of His divine will that we become a royal priesthood.

Second: are you unworthy of the Sacrament of Holy Orders? Well, the right question here is whether you are called to this Sacrament. The ministerial priesthood is a vocation. Would you ever consider yourself unworthy of the Sacrament of Matrimony? Yet it is equally valuable, and it is also a calling.

Ultimately it's truly not a matter of worth - nobody can claim to be "worthy", but, rather we all acknowledge that any "worth" comes from the fact that we are created in God's image and likeness and that "we no longer live, but Christ lives in us". It's a matter of vocation.

Discernment and being open to God's will is a necessary step. Seek, and you shall find. If you are called to priesthood, this will become evident. Matthew had no doubt that Christ had called him. Peter had no doubt that he was unworthy of following Christ. Both became His apostles, and are now honored as great saints.


#12

It's those not asking about their worthiness we need to worry about....


#13

[quote="4givemeasinner, post:1, topic:301417"]
I want to be a priest. but have comitted sins (mostly sexual stuff; i.e., condoms, "internet temptations, and related sins").

am i unworthy to be a priest?

[/quote]

Name one person who "is" worthy to be a Priest, with the exception of Jesus Christ Himself of course.


#14

[quote="R_C, post:11, topic:301417"]
Like many, I can relate to this feeling.

First: you are a priest. :confused: I am referring to the common priesthood of all the baptized. It suddenly ceases to be a matter of how worthy we are: it is by God's merit and because of His divine will that we become a royal priesthood.

Second: are you unworthy of the Sacrament of Holy Orders? Well, the right question here is whether you are called to this Sacrament. The ministerial priesthood is a vocation. Would you ever consider yourself unworthy of the Sacrament of Matrimony? Yet it is equally valuable, and it is also a calling.

Ultimately it's truly not a matter of worth - nobody can claim to be "worthy", but, rather we all acknowledge that any "worth" comes from the fact that we are created in God's image and likeness and that "we no longer live, but Christ lives in us". It's a matter of vocation.

Discernment and being open to God's will is a necessary step. Seek, and you shall find. If you are called to priesthood, this will become evident. Matthew had no doubt that Christ had called him. Peter had no doubt that he was unworthy of following Christ. Both became His apostles, and are now honored as great saints.

[/quote]

Just wanted to say that I love this response. :thumbsup:
I hope you all the best in your discernment process.
I'd like to stress the joy of following one's vocation. I'm happily married. There are challenges. But hey, it's great to be alive!!!... and, that I think is God's confirmation that I am responding to his call. All the best.


#15

Not to worry, but it becomes even more imperative from priesthood on that you keep yourself untainted and separate yourself from occasions of sin. You will be called to even more severe account if you fail here, so it’s best that you obtain control of your sins beforehand.

Don’t fall for the criminal record check. Plead conscientious objection. The grounds do not need to be your request to be a priest. You have rights simply on the grounds of being a Catholic.

This Deitically unsanctioned request from you is a legacy of an Institution that shirked from it’s duty to correct when it was required, and did not take the opportunity to teach another institution about principles of forgiveness and the sacrifices this charity demands of all entities.

The common good is restrained in 2 Cor 2,6 and insists that focus is on closure after a sentence is complete. The Church need not carry this responsibility which lies solely with the civil world.

However, the Church has the right to insist that you disclose that if you had any criminal past, that you have completed all sentencing from a civil point of view.


#16

forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=719015

I wrote the above as per this thread, but it seemed more of a standalone post, so I posted it by itself.

Anyway, I hope it helps.


#17

This is terrible advice that is contrary to what the majority of diocese now do.

The Church is an employer, and it is her duty to ensure that all people who are ministering in the name of the Church are not going to bring the Church into disrepute.

In my diocese, it’s standard practice and mandatory for any ministry in any parish that you complete and pass a criminal record check and take a seminar called Called to Protect. There are no ifs ands or buts; if you refuse you cannot work, “contentious” objection or whatever you want to claim notwithstanding. I can tell you that I was required to pass a criminal record check as part of my seminary application.

Refusing to do one is a bad start of disobedience. I feel that such a thought is not coming from any theology, but rather from a political motivation (I’ll just name it: probably some form of libertarianism). Any future priest owes their bishop obedience.


#18

Nice!!! very nicely said.!!!:thumbsup:


#19

“The Church is an employer”

The Church is first and foremost obedient to God’s principles, then it is an employer. Becoming an employer, it is bound to apply principles of God in it’s mandate as employer.

“Criminal record”

If we are to believe Sister Helen Prejean, and what is going on in our justice system, then the criminal record is not an unblemished document. It is a fallible document and it is an injustice to those who have served their debt to society and are in it, who have been convicted through a corrupt due process system, and who are all together innocent, or just happen to be on the wrong side of some official who was having a bad day due to a marriage breakup, …it goes on. Let’s go further. Better than 60% of the crimes were misdemeanor and should have had an unconditional pardon(remember that in Catechism?) after sentence was paid. Forget the expungment application, the Church, the one I know, would ask the person supplying the criminal record if all who paid their debt are still on the record.

Those being called to priesthood are on the road to Emmaus, and they carry their sins with them. No one jumped in front of Paul before Christ appeared to short circuit Christ in his selection, suggesting to Christ he made the wrong selection. What are the results of Christ’s seemingly dangerous method of enlistment? No mistake here it would seem, evidence the countless prayers this “criminal” received and the value to the Church today?. Indeed, we have evidence from scripture of what is already plain before us; 77 X 7 doesn’t exactly elicit feelings of trust, and that is our error. This is because that is not what we are being commanded, we are commanded to trust God and HOPE for our fraternal brothers.

Scripture admitted Paul was culpable of one of the worst sins there are. So to what standard are we trying to emulate if we are to emulate Christ? Is today’s search for pedophiles our concern? Of course, as far as we are allowed to go, but no further. In his duty to the Sanhedrin, by child abuse of another class, how many children were sentenced by handing over of these families to the Romans, and destined to the forum for gruesome entertainment?. How many children were torn from their families and scattered to an unknown destiny to live lives and learn of atheism and worship sexual gods? But even if there wasn’t any compounding such as this is, he was still culpable by desire. He had is conscience to follow, and he knew the Romans were a potential enemy of this fledgling group, and so it was his duty,(you note we begin to see the analogy) to state to the Sanhedrin that they were wrong and have no part in it, period.

Perhaps you will find other cases more to taste. Augustine admitted to sexual promiscuity, no criminal check to capture his crimes, and more noteworthy, still accepted as a Doctor of the Church. Since your adamant in defending the criminal record, God defines what is criminal, and crimes of antiquity are still crimes, and so this news is now yours and by your position implicate Augustine and Paul and conclude they should not have been admitted to the Church.

But lets look at this wonderful instrument of scandal that all arguments rest their case on. The criminal record records sins also. If a misdemeanor committed 50 years ago is still on the record, then this is “recorded” in the celestial criminal record file, and someone is charged who did not treat everyone like his fraternal brother and decided to leave it recorded to compound it’s scandal and mischief, and thus ending up at the diocese desk, in front of those who should know better to even be in it’s proximity. This person went home and forgave his son perhaps 2 times a day. If we assume the same standard, then he should also make a written record of the wrong to perpetuity, and make it public so you can see it, since you see nothing wrong in that.

But it is true, I don’t understand your Catholicity, the willingness to look anyway when we know it’s accuracy is in question, witness the due process failings outlined in Sister Prejean’s(“Dead man Walking”), lawyers who did not zealously defend, judges who judged on consideration of honor among men first, on police who made sure publicly visual arrests were for all to see, and grade school speaking was in the papers, but all the while vent no protest of their own, and those who make a mockery of due process, and others as well.

So if I can do my part in creating priests who dare to not be politically correct, to state their lawful right Opinio Tolerta(Sententia Pia), to actually live in fraternity the days of Corinthians, then I am pleased.


#20

You are good! As we are all sinners and more important we forgive too.

Amen.


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