Update: Yiannopoulos also banned from censorship event


#1

Manchester Union:

Update: Yiannopoulos also banned from censorship event

Following the decision to prohibit Julie Bindel from speaking at an event hosted by the University of Manchester Free Speech and Secular Society, the Students’ Union Executive Team have now moved to ban men’s rights activist Milo Yiannapoulos, who was originally scheduled to debate alongside her.
Bindel and Yiannapoulos were both booked to speak at a debate entitled “From liberation to censorship: Does modern feminism have a problem with free speech?”
to take place on the 15th of October.
In their initial statement the Students’ Union Executive Team rejected Bindel on the grounds that her appearance would be “potentially in breach of [the] safe space policy.”
Yiannopoulos was, however, initially permitted to attend, albeit under the conditions the event had increased security levels and was ticketed.

In a comment on the Manchester Students’ Union Facebook page to this original decision Yiannopoulos wrote, “I’m astonished that I wasn’t outright banned as well. I’ll have to up my game!”
Women’s Officer Jess Lishak posted an extended explanation in a blog post—since removed due to developments in this situation—to her official Facebook page. In this she described Bindel as a “famous transphobe,” and Yiannopoulos as a “professional misogynist.”
Since this, however, the Union has said that they have been made aware of new information and evidence regarding Yiannopoulos and have amended their original statement after seeking legal advice.

:rotfl::rotfl::rotfl:


#2

Free speech indeed. Hypocrites.


#3

“Liberating tolerance, then, would mean intolerance against movements from the Right and toleration of movements from the Left.” - Progressive hero Herbert Marcuse

Progressivism, by definition, does not tolerate free speech.


#4

Aw, they were just afraid Milo would trigger them and send them running to a padded room.

And he probably would have, because he’s generally right about free speech.


#5

Wow, for a group that preaches tolerance, liberals seem to fail to adhere to it all the time.


#6

I live in Manchester! I have seen some of Milo Yiannapoulos videos on Youtube, he just likes to mock feminists and atheists.

Feminists love to demonize men and atheists take great delight in bullying and mocking people of faith, why on Earth should they demand respect from anyone?!


#7

Milo is rather a professional provocateur and it would have been wiser not to invite him in the first place. Most of his fame seems to come from being invited and then dis-invited or actually making it to the event and being shouted down.

If the SJWs had any brains they would make a show of snoring thru his speeches.


#8

Why do so many people have a ridiculous conception of what free speech is? The university is allowed to uninvite him from their event if they want. That isn’t violating any popular conception of free speech, and I really don’t think it counts as censorship, except on perhaps the most superficial level.

The fact is that Milo is classist, sexist, weirdly homophobic towards lesbians and undoubtedly transphobic. The students’ union is not compelled to invite him to their event and I feel like they’re making the correct decision here.


#9

I like Yianoppoulos’s story about the UK politician Nick Griffin. In Britain, he is the head of the British Nationalist Party, which for some time had a significant following. Then they let Nick Griffin onto a televised interview. Many people - such as yourself - decried the BBC for letting that man on, because he was a racist among other things. But only when who he was and what he stood for saw the light of day did people stop voting for him and the BNP. It is now basically dead in Britain.

The moral being that the best way to destroy a bad idea is to give it enough rope to hang itself. That means exposing it to the light of day. Kind of like reverse kryptonite. People want Milo because he’s got things worth saying. People hate college professors because they generally don’t. :stuck_out_tongue:


#10

Or perhaps do as students did to Allen West, when he spoke at St. Louis University last week. Students opposed to West filled the auditorium. When he began to speak, they quietly filed out, leaving behind a much smaller audience, most of whom were not students.

stltoday.com/lifestyles/relationships-and-special-occasions/parenting/aisha-sultan/aisha-sultan-slu-students-walk-out-of-speech-stand-for/article_d9d573b1-c180-5d51-80c9-465f436d0ffc.html

(the link is to an opinion columnist who dislikes West, and her comments reflect that. I use this link because of the embedded video)


#11

Well, of course not. A private university has every right to limit its message to a particular POV.
As far as the correct decision, it depends on whether one believes a university should be a bastion of the free exchange of ideas. The progressive movement clearly does not believe in a free exchange of ideas. So, the decision is not surprising


#12

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