US Catholic college presidents call for continuation of program allowing undocumented immigrant students [CC]


#1

More than 70 presidents of American Catholic colleges and universities have joined in a public statement of support for students from families of undocumented immigrants, saying that these students should be allowed to complete their studies.

More…


#2

Before anyone’s knees begin to jerk, this statement seems to include legal help for the students to confirm legal status. It is not a proposal to ignore or defy existing law. It is a good thing for all Catholic institutions to do.


#3

I agree that helping these students is a good thing to do.


#4

Possibly there is some reason why these students can’t get student visas like every other student in the world seems able to do. But if there is, I have not heard of it.

One thing I wonder about as well. If these students are illegal, either they are using forged identification or the schools don’t require ID of them like they do for legal residents. Either way, it’s odd.


#5

Or they were brought here a long time ago by their parents…


#6

It does say already in a course of study…I can support that.


#7

My nephews were brought to this country from England when they were 3 and 1. They didn’t have passports. Of course, this was in the 60’s and they were Anglo-Saxon, so no one ever questioned their nationality or their right to be here. Neither applied for citizenship until after 9/11. No problem.

Not all illegals are from south of the border.


#8

I would not criticize anyone for not knowing this particular government acronym, DACA–Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

This explanation may help:

us-immigrationservice.org/forms/i-821d-deferred-action-daca-renewal?utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc

DACA is a deferral for children brought here illegally. It is temporary (2 years) and gives them time to regularize their status. Apparently it can be renewed if the process takes more than 2 years. If they fail to follow through, they are just undocumented immigrants like many others. One of the problems is that some people see it as children ratting out their parents.

Our parish has a lot of legal refugees from Burma and has had foreign citizen priests for many years. They have been from Nigeria, Uganda, Burma, Sri Lanka, India, Poland, and Ireland. I may have missed some countries. They are usually assigned to our parish because of its proximity to the chancery office. Doing all the paper work for legal residency and work permits and driver’s licenses for these well educated men takes several months. I can only imagine it is worse for children.


#9

My guess is that many of them are in the process of getting some kind of documentation.

That fact was grossly overlooked during high school graduation season last spring.

Those of us who work in universities are happy to work with students regardless of their immigration status.

I suspect most Americans want those convicted of crimes gone.

Personally, I support Bill O’Reilly’s plan for immigration.


#10

I wish more people realized that. People would be amazed as to who and what border patrol agents have seen on the border.

It was also possible to visit Canada without a passport then. If you’re American, don’t try to visit or Canada or Mexico without proper paperwork. They are FAR more stricter than the USA is on immigration.


#11

So why the double standards?

Why is it okay for Mexico or Canada to have immigration laws but the US is supposed to not have any?


#12

It’s California. We’ve been adding and abetting the violation of immigration laws on a massive scale for decades. Sanctuary cities, special order 40 in LA and on and on…


#13

This is the more likely scenario.


#14

:hmmm: - shouldn’t the top priority of these TOP Catholic educators involve something more educational and less against existing laws?


#15

I don’t know what O’Reilley’s plan is, so I can’t comment on it.

I don’t know what it takes to get a student visa, but it appears not to be too difficult because there are millions of foreigners here who have them. Likely, it would take a trip to whatever the embassy is in the home country, making an application, etc. While this might seem an unnecessary inconvenience to some, it’s still the law and apparently not all that difficult to accomplish.

Ignoring the law when the only consequence of obeying it is an inconvenience to the applicant, does not seem justified to me. And so, these schools are enabling the use of forged documents; something they would absolutely expel a legal student for doing, or simply not requiring any identification at all for their “preferred” students while requiring it for all others.

In order, then, to feel good about themselves, these school personnel pass up the opportunity to tell students “Oh, yes, you’re welcome here, but we do require that you exercise the personal responsibility to do it right” instead instructing them that law breaking is held at no consequence to them.


#16

I’m tempted to say it very bluntly, but perhaps I had better say it in a more gentle way.

It’s because it’s fashionable among the elites of this country to disdain this country, its laws, and the people in it.


#17

I agree that the colleges should not be giving people special treatment and allowing them to break laws, but most of the foreign students tend to come from the upper class or otherwise have easy access to resources. A family from Siberia, for example, would have to take a week to travel to one of three cities in the West, be able to afford accommodations and the paperwork, and then have the resources to travel and stay in the USA. At least, that’s what I was told when I was over there. So it’s not as simple as just walking to the embassy and filing a form.

On the other hand, I’ve long supported mandating that universities give Americans preference. Why should someone from the 1% in say, Korea, edge out a middle class American when applying to Harvard? Supposedly they could fill their spots five times over without lowering their standards. That rich foreign student could take advantage of the top universities in their country, so they’re not exactly losing out.


#18

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