US Marshals arresting people for not paying their federal student loans


#1

HOUSTON (FOX 26) - Believe it or not, the US Marshals Service in Houston is arresting people for not paying their outstanding federal student loans.

Paul Aker says he was arrested at his home last week for a $1500 federal student loan he received in 1987.

He says seven deputy US Marshals showed up at his home with guns and took him to federal court where he had to sign a payment plan for the 29-year-old school loan.

More:
fox26houston.com/news/local-news/92232732-story


#2

They’ve got to be kidding. We are 18 trillion in debt, and this is what our public servants are doing?

Just another reason why some young people want criminal justice reform!


#3

I suspect there is more to this story than was reported. He probably had disregarded previous orders of the court.


#4

There are many outstanding loans to be paid. From the Wall Street Journal :

wsj.com/articles/about-7-million-americans-havent-paid-federal-student-loans-in-at-least-a-year-1440175645

"Nearly 7 million Americans have gone at least a year without making a payment on their federal student loans, a high level of default that suggests a widening swath of households are unable or unwilling to pay back their school debt.

As of July, 6.9 million Americans with student loans hadn’t sent a payment to the government in at least 360 days, quarterly data from the Education Department showed this past week. That was up 6%, or 400,000 borrowers, from a year earlier.

That translates into about 17% of all borrowers with federal loans being severely delinquent, a share that would be even higher if borrowers currently in school who aren’t yet required to repay were excluded. Millions of other borrowers are months behind but haven’t hit the 360-day threshold that the government defines as a default."


#5

Already being discussed here.

Long and short he was not arrested for failure to pay the loan, but because he never showed up for court summons. The reason for the armed response was that when Marshals showed up at his home, he retreated into the house and told them he had a gun. The Marshals then had to call local police and other marshals as they were not sure if Aker was preparing to shot them after his “I have a gun” comment. Given the number of law enforcement murdered recently, seems a prudent move on their part.

Even at that the Marshals didn’t arrest him, but escorted him to court. On top of it the judge is requiring him to pay the $1,500 for the cost of the Marshals having to bring him in.

Hmmm, maybe he should have paid his debts and shown up for court hearings. At best, he should know not to tell law enforcement that he has a gun and locking himself in his house.


#6

Probably the former . . .


#7

Already a thread on this here: forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=999636


#8

I am sure some can’t pay.

But I wouldn’t assume that it is a majority.

Totally anecdotal but a friend of mine was explaining why she couldn’t afford to make payments on her student loan. While she was explaining, someone noticed her manicured nails.

When asked about them, she explained that she had just spent the day at the spa. Mani, pedi and facial were all included as well as a massage. :eek:

She didn’t understand why people were laughing at her. :shrug:


#9

I think many people are under the impression, once they get their degree and complete school, they will be making big money right away and figure making a fairly low student loan payment will not be a problem, but then reality kicks in when they get out in the real world.

They have all these monthly bills, rent and car payment come first, so a student loan payment is something many think they can blow off for awhile until they get caught up or find a better job…years go by, and eventually they default.

I dont think it was right to send LE to his house though, its still just debt, even if there was a court date, its DEBT, its not criminal courtroom. It would be similar to LE trying to arrest someone who was later found to be innocent, any fight that person put up in his arrest would have to be justified, as NO person should just give in if they know for a fact they are innocent. If its found LE/ courts were wrong, you cant hold the person responsible for trying to defend his freedom, due to them being wrong in the first place. (my opinion anyway).


#10

Then perhaps people should be careful about taking out debt when they have no clear plan on how they will repay it. Reminds me of a niece of mine that left college with 60k in debt. Her degree? Liberal Arts with a focus in LGBT studies. Wow there aren’t thousands of good paying jobs for such a high quality degree? Shocker.

The other thing is some people get degrees but want to only work in certain high cost areas or areas where there is little demand (marine biologist in Boulder, CO). Take a friend of mine who insists on living in San Francisco and then complains about the high cost of living. Uh, perhaps don’t live in one of the most expensive places in the world.

I get that people get behind, but blowing off any obligation is wrong. If you have trouble paying it then talk to the lender, don’t just expect that your promise to repay is just best effort. How would people feel if there student loan suddenly didn’t pay their tuition, books, or room and board. I can guarantee you if the check didn’t show up that they could be motivated to contact them.

I dont think it was right to send LE to his house though, its still just debt, even if there was a court date, its DEBT, its not criminal courtroom. It would be similar to LE trying to arrest someone who was later found to be innocent, any fight that person put up in his arrest would have to be justified, as NO person should just give in if they know for a fact they are innocent. If its found LE/ courts were wrong, you cant hold the person responsible for trying to defend his freedom, due to them being wrong in the first place. (my opinion anyway).

Again he was in a 2 hour stand off after telling the marshal he had a gun. He could defend
his freedom in court (if he’d bother to show up), but hey its not a big deal. It’s only a debt. Not sure why a sane person would hide in their house and threaten a law enforcement officer witha gun for doing their job.

I’ll try telling my mortgage lender that it’s only a debt and I won’t pay it. I’m pretty sure the sherif will be more than willing to explain to me that I got something now via a promise to repay it later. If I can’t get my house for free why should he (or anyone else) get their education for free?

That is part of the problem with this country now. Too many people don’t see a need to live up to their obligations. “It’s too hard.” B-O-O-H-O-O.


#11

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