US prepared to broker Gaza ceasefire, says Obama


#1

The US is prepared to broker a ceasefire between Israel and Palestinian militants in Gaza, President Barack Obama has said.

His comments came during a phone conversation with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-28258448


#2

Wonder how he plans on doing that?

Wonder what Netenyahu thinks of the offer.


#3

I’m sure he’s willing, but I don’t think it’s a serious offer. Obama knows that Netenyahu isn’t looking for a ceasefire, he’s looking to invade Gaza and confiscate lots of missiles that found their way in during the previous Egyptian government.


#4

From what I have heard in the news, neither side is interested in making a unilateral ceasefire. Whether a negotiated, and joint, ceasefire can be arranged, I don’t know. From what I have read, neither side is tired enough, yet, to negotiate an end.


#5

Any wagers on just who will beat him to it?


#6

I think this would be great and all so long as the Islamist terrorists respect the cease fire. Unfortunately I don’t think they will. They don’t seem to want peace. They just want to destroy Israel and that’s hurting the Palestinian Christians.


#7

:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

I was thinking this morning thst it wasn’t that long ago
the leaders were hosting the Holy Father during his visit to the middle rsst and then both sides joined Pope Francis in Rome for prayer.
Now this. What happened?


#8

Last month,Israeli president Shimon Peres and Palestinian Authority leader Mahmoud Abbas met with Pope Francis at the Vatican. As part of peace talks, they jointly prayed.
latimes.com/world/europe/la-fg-pope-francis-israel-palestinian-peace-20140608-story.html

However, Mahmoud Abbas has little control over Hamas or events in Gaza. And Shimon Peres, who is 90 y.o., leaves office in two weeks. However, even if Peres were to remain in office, I don’t think the presidency has much influence on setting Israeli policy. Prime Minister Netanyahu holds the reins of government.


#9

Whenever this subject comes up I wonder why it is that Palestinians always “attack” and Israelis always “retaliate?” Decades of this conflict being constantly framed in this manner have clearly impacted the opinions of many American citizens. Isn’t it interesting how language and media shapes and molds and determines our outlooks?
:coffee:


#10

The “attack” was 3 israeli teens kidnapped from a bus stop and executed and buried in shallow graves. Thus retaliation.


#11

Problem is Obamas foreign policy has been so inept neither Party trusts the US.


#12


#13

Well, sure, that’s the way American media is framing it. There are antecedents to every atrocity in the Middle East, so it’s a chicken before the egg kind of question. Even so, it seems crazy that Israel has managed to play the defensive, innocent victim ever since 1948. To me, characterizing Palestinians as terrorists or aggressors is precisely the same as some sleazy rapist going to court and blaming their victim. That tends to confuse and sway jurors in just the same way that the US media coverage of the Middle East tends to sway American citizens.

I may as well mention that I’ve been to the Holy Land and that I was treated far, far differently by Israeli Arabs / Palestinian Christians than I was by Israeli Jews. From what I saw firsthand, I would say that Palestinians are the poorest of the poor. I honestly believe they could hold their own with any third world nation. Admittedly, that is only speculation, as of course there are tons of horrible places I’ve never been. Still, though, it’s generally acknowledged that Israel’s military is the fourth most powerful on Earth, just behind the US, Russia and China, whereas Palestine probably wouldn’t even show up in the top 100. I am quite sure that virtually any Catholic who travelled to the Holy Land would agree with me…
:coffee:


#14

Hamas is not alone. They have other countries making sure they have their missiles and weapons.


#15

Hamas is not alone. They have other countries making sure they have their missiles and weapons.


#16

Israel has already said they are not interested in a ceasefire and I don’t blame them.


#17

You mean like this poor guy? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Munib_al-Masri

One of the worst things about the Israeli/Palestinian conflict is that the Palestinian side rejects what could be the best thing that could possibly happen to their people; economic cooperation with Israel. Read the whole article and you’ll see one example right at the end.

Another example is Zafer al-Masri who was elected mayor of Nablus. He worked out a deal with Israel by which Palestinians could commute freely to work in Israel, thus giving them a chance to work productively at Israeli wages. But that wouldn’t do. He was assassinated by a branch of Black September, and the whole project fell apart.

Another example. Remember the “peace agreement” worked out during the Clinton administration that later fell apart? Well, there was an economic agreement as well, which included Israel, the U.S. and Saudi Arabia. The U.S. and Saudi ARabia were to provide a lot of capital to built an absolutely knockout tourist destination on the Gaza beaches. Israel was to provide the power, infrastructure know-how and water. Fatah was to provide the “muscle” to guard the wealthy who were expected to flock to this destination just as they used to flock to Beirut before Islamists made a war zone out of it.

Well, Arafat stole the “up front” money, put it in Swiss banks and started the Intifada to cover his criminal act, and the whole thing fell apart. Ultimately, Fatah made Arafat’s widow disgorge some of that money, and today it’s invested by Fatah in the U.S.

The Levant could be an incredibly prosperous place. Lots of Palestinians are very well educated. Israel is extremely proficient at development and high-end industry. An absolutely ideal scenario for prosperity. But it won’t happen because the “mafiosi” who control the Palestinian side of it might lose their power (and money they invested in the U.S.) if their people were less dependent on handouts and had more to say about their own lives.


#18

Hmmm. Guess I wasn’t as topical as I should have been, so here goes.

The U.S. will broker nothing. It will seem to do so as soon as the Israelis have accomplished their main objectives and have Hamas by the throat. As has happened many times in the past, the U.S. will then tell Israel not to finish them off, just short of total destruction of Hamas as an organization.

And Obama might get a second Nobel Peace Prize out of it, though i’m not sure the Nobel committee does that.


#19

Matt. 5:1-2; 9

[1] Seeing the crowds, he went up on the mountain, and when he sat down his disciples came to him.

[2] And he opened his mouth and taught them, saying:

[9] "Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God.

quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/r/rsv/rsv-idx?type=DIV2&byte=4576340


#20

You can say that again. :wink:

I doubt either side wants to hear anything from Obama that does not end with, “more money to do what you are doing now.” Israelies are vastly outnumbered in the region and both sides know that. One sides wants Israel to exist and the other does not. Where do you find a compromise on that?


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.