USA Today: Second healthcare worker infected with Ebola in Dallas


#1

USA just reported this: usatoday.com/videos/news/nation/2014/10/15/17290997/


#2

Breitbart has an article on this, their source is the AP.

breitbart.com/system/wire/ap_ab3cd5a9b32c450aa5a13e1a4a14c60e

DALLAS (AP) — A second health care worker at a Dallas hospital who provided care for the first Ebola patient diagnosed in the U.S. has tested positive for the disease, the Texas Department of State Health Services said Wednesday.

The department said in a statement that the worker reported a fever Tuesday and was immediately isolated at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. Health officials said the worker was among those who took care of Thomas Eric Duncan, who was diagnosed with Ebola after coming to the U.S. from Liberia. Duncan died Oct. 8.


#3

The protocol for donning and doffing the PPe is well over 100 pages. Add fear to that every time you doff your PPE, without special training and practice runs, mistakes happen.


#4

My husband is a physician and the chief medical officer of a large hospital system. They’re trying to prepare for an Ebola patient, should they receive one. Their goals are to protect their staff and offer high quality care to their patient. The CDC has very inadequate protocols- and continuously changes these protocols. We are being mislead about this disease as it has apparently mutated to the point that a much smaller viral load is needed to infect a patient. Not for one minute do I think that the nurses that are infected broke protocol! As an RN myself, I know how incredibly careful one is around someone who is contagious with a potentially fatal illness. Instead, I feel that the CDC protocols are to blame. Science has failed them. These nurses obviously came in contact with the virus to be infected- but their exposure was minimal and they still contracted the disease. At least in my husband’s hospitals, they are now opting for full hazmat gear for the staff. There is much to consider, such as lab and respiratory equipment, procedures such as central lines and intubation, etc. I fear that no matter how well prepared, the medical staff remain at risk. This is a time for prayer.


#5

I am not a nurse or doctor, just want to get that out there up front. I am not an authority of any kind, BUT based on the reading I am doing it seems the following is minimum procedure:

  1. complete covering of the nurse so that no skin is exposed and the covering should be nonpermiable rubber or plastic.
  2. Prior to donning or removing the protective equipment, it should be sprayed down with a bleach solution.
  3. No nurse should remove their protective clothing themselves but a specially trained nurse should do that for each patient.
  4. respirators should be used not surgical masks

Do they train for these conditions?


#6

According to the CDC, the hospital and nurses are at fault for contracting Ebola.

foxnews.com/health/2014/10/15/cdc-director-clearly-something-went-wrong-for-texas-nurse-to-contract-ebola/


#7

Of course,big surprise!:rolleyes:


#8

You are probably all too correct. I am sure we are going to have more trouble with this illness than they would like us too think. I pray I am wrong. In the meantime they better be working on a vaccine (should have been long ago) and people better be extra careful about washing their hands and taking their own precautions to whatever extent possible.

I don’t think it would be overkill to stop all incoming flights/travel from the affected regions of Africa. But then I suppose people might call me nuts. I don’t really care.


#9

I don’t think you’re nuts. I think this should have been one of the 1st things we did to protect the American public. This scripted line that “we won’t be able to get flights in or out to care for patients in Africa” is the biggest lie of all. The government must think that we are idiots to believe this.


#10

They are working on a vaccine, but it won’t be available for at least a year. Up until recently, it wasn’t a huge priority and only 1300 or so people were involved in it’s development. It does appear to be effective, but takes a while to produce. Something about tobacco leaves and some process that takes a long time to complete. Not too sure about those details. As for the nurses that have contracted Ebola- as I understand it, they were in compliance with the protocols and were unaware of any exposure. This offers a clue that the viral load to infect has decreased significantly. I would like to see all Ebola patients treated at the 4 hospitals specifically trained for highly contagious, life threatening diseases, such as Emory. Unfortunately, Ebola can walk into any hospital and threaten the staff. Therefore, the CDC should lessen their focus on telling everyone how “difficult it is to catch Ebola” and focus more on hospital and staff training and protocols. I do have a real concern about how this is being handled on the national level.


#11

Stopping flights would be completely ineffective and counterproductive. Someone who wanted to leave would take a bus or drive to an unaffected area and fly from there. Also, without bringing in additional personnel to combat the outbreak in the affected areas, the disease will continue to spread. Bringing under control in Africa is the best way to protect the rest of the world. This is the opinion of infectious disease specialists.

The Dallas hospital did NOT follow the protocols. They did not provide adequate protective gear. The nurses complained about that, and the administration did not act on those complaints.


#12

You would still have a passport from these areas. And blaming the hospital & nurses for this is, as you put it, counterproductive.


#13

Take a bus to somewhere or drive? A lot of these people are not that wealthy, Ivory Coast additionally secured its borders, restricted flights and has no cases of ebola. They are going to lift that flight ban probably with heavy restrictions. Ivory Coast has borders with two of the affected nations as well, Liberia and Guinea.

The Ivorian government had announced the suspension of all flights from Ebola hit nations in August, and 10 days later it closed its borders with Liberia, a move strongly criticized by the countries affected and World Health Organization (WHO).

Ivory Coast which has close proximity with two of the three nations worst hit by Ebola, has no case of the virus which has killed over 3,000people.

“Apart from lifting the ban on flights his country has contributed $1 million to international anti-Ebola effort and has opened a humanitarian corridor,” Outtarra said.

ventures-africa.com/2014/10/ivory-coast-to-resume-flight-to-ebola-hit-nations/

The Dallas hospital did NOT follow the protocols. They did not provide adequate protective gear. The nurses complained about that, and the administration did not act on those complaints.

But the Dallas hospital likewise did NOT bring ebola into the US.


#14

I didn’t blame anyone. My point was that we have the means to prevent the spread of Ebola IF the correct measures are taken. People in Texas are becoming infected because those protocols were not followed.

Not everyone leaving Africa has a passport from an African country. The priest who infected the nurse in Spain was a Spanish national. There are people who hold Liberian passports who have not lived there for years. And, most importantly, unless people with the necessary skills are brought into African to stop the spread THERE, it will become a pandemic.


#15

#16

It’s something Ivory Coast could halt ebola by restricting its borders because if the Fruit Bat carries ebola which I believe is suspected but not confirmed along with other animals, animals know no borders. I even read an article and I’m sure one can search the web for it, Fruit Bat is considered a delicacy by some of the societies over there.

The victim, Phan, I have heard is already skyping friends and the like.

The 2nd patient, it is being reported flew on Frontier Airlines just the other day, maybe even yesterday. Something to keep in mind.cnbc.com/id/102078863

Newest Ebola patient flew Frontier Airlines day before diagnosis


#17

And you know this how?? This isn’t true. Don’t believe everything printed in the MSM. The protocols have changed and continue to change. Currently, at my husband’s hospitals, they are making their own protocols as the CDC is less than helpful. They are going well beyond what is currently being recommended, for they feel that the CDC protocols are not adequate to protect the staff treating an Ebola patient. He is consulting with some of the top infectious disease experts in the country to establish the protocols that will be used at his hospitals- and they, too, are concerned about what is coming out of the CDC. Rather than pointing fingers at the Dallas hospital or the nurses, we should all be more concerned about the inadequacies in the current national protocols and the political nature of the CDC. I do have legitimate Momma concerns too- my son is an Emergency Room physician, my other son is a physician in hematology/oncology and my daughter-in-law is a surgeon. All are at risk. So my prayer is that they and all medical workers will be kept safe from this disease.


#18

Is it going to be where once one has the ebola virus, even if one recovers from the sickness, it will always be in their body? That’s a curious question.


#19

There has been CDC personnel in Dallas and overseeing operations since this disaster began. To say the hospital staff did not follow protocol is not right. My sister is a healthcare worker in another Dallas area hospital & they had a possible infection this past weekend. CDC personnel were everywhere. The CDC has been sooo confident that this would be difficult to transmit; apparently they are WRONG!!

As far as the passport issue, if I knew that travel to a certain country was banned I would look for another destination. England & France have done this. The more countries that ban travel from the infected areas the more people will come here. If my mother knew that a kid next door to us had chicken pox she would not allow us to go to visit nor would she let kids from that house come to our house. It is called common sense.:shrug:


#20

Nurses: We Were Told to Call Authorities for Ebola Protocol

breitbart.com/Breitbart-TV/2014/10/15/Nurses-We-Were-Told-to-Call-Authorities-for-Ebola-Protocol

A statement from National Nurses United on the treatment of Dallas Ebola patient said that “nurses were asked to call the Infectious Disease Department” to learn the policies on how to treat Duncan.

The statement, which was played in its entirety on CNN on Wednesday morning, also reports that Ebola training at the hospital was “optional,” “nurses have been left to train each other,” and that nurses who interacted with Duncan simply continued treating other patients.

According to the statement, “there was no advanced preparedness on what to do with the patient. There was no protocol, there was no system. The nurses were asked to call the Infectious Disease Department. The Infectious Disease Department did not have clear policies to provide either.”


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