Use your credit card at Target? Here's what to do if your data might have been swiped


#1

Use your credit card at Target? Here's what to do if your data might have been swiped

As many as 40 million Target customers had their credit and debit card information ripped off by thieves over 19 days this holiday shopping season, including the Black Friday weekend. While thieves will only use a small percentage of the black magnetic strip data taken from those cards, it's still a smart idea for shoppers take precautions immediately if they think their information could be in danger, experts say.

Here's what you should do if you think you might be a victim.

(read more)

Apparently, if you used your credit or debit card at Target (in store) between November 27th and December 15th, your info might have been stolen.


#2

GIven the volume of ACH transactions, I think it's only a matter of time before thieves would try this on such a big ... Target. Sorry, couldn't help...

Laughing not to cry. The last time we had something like this happen (a local grocery store chain in early 2013), banks were charging folks left and right for printing new debit cards, pinning them, mailing them, putting holds on accounts, etc. I'm starting to see the attraction of using prepaid cards that you load as you need. Aside from budgeting, if the number is compromised, throw away the card and get a new one.

But the lesson here is to use credit cards instead of debit cards, they offer more protection against theft. A thief can wipe out a debit account in minutes, leaving you not only without funds but also at the mercy of every bounced check and returned check and overdraft fee that comes in. We botched the dates of payment (moved one a week earlier than my paycheck) and bounced 14 items in 6 hours, for total fees of nearly $300, and that was at a credit union - not to mention another $150 in late payment and interest fees for the bills that didn't get paid. If it had been a bank, it would have been far worse.


#3

Thankfully I don’t have a credit card. I only ever use the prepaid ones when I want to buy stuff online. You put money on it one time, use it, and then it’s done.


#4

Fortunately, there isn’t a Target in town, and even if there were, we wouldn’t be using it, because of their offensive, materialist commercials. “My kind of holiday” indeed!


#5

This sort of thing really annoys me. There are a lot of articles telling me what I should do if I used my card at Target. I shouldn’t have to do anything! I didn’t commit fraud! If banks want us to use their credit and debit cards and stores want to accept them, then the burden of fraud needs to be on the banks and the stores, not on the consumer.


#6

[quote="JimG, post:5, topic:348661"]
This sort of thing really annoys me. There are a lot of articles telling me what I should do if I used my card at Target. I shouldn't have to do anything! I didn't commit fraud! If banks want us to use their credit and debit cards and stores want to accept them, then the burden of fraud needs to be on the banks and the stores, not on the consumer.

[/quote]

:thumbsup:

Especially when it's the store's fault that the data was stolen. (NPR noted in this afternoon's coverage that there was talk that it was an inside job.)


#7

Well, I wont be going to target anytime soon!!

The said thing is…Im sure right now, there are hundreds of people shopping there, and probably using credit cards…how stupid can people get? Unless they havent seen the news, that is a pretty big risk they are willing to take, just to go shopping.

I had planned on going there after Christmas, as they have killer markdowns starting dec 26th, but not with this news!!

Its probably only a matter of time before they hit another major retailer too.

NBC news said it was probably done over seas, so nothing law enforcement in the US can do about it…amazing, they have a free pass, they look at the US as a big ATM machine, no risk, all reward…of course they will hit more retailers. LOL


#8

That’s a valid point. Target says “Sorry!” The banks say “Sorry!” We’re out the funds, or have to pay to have an insurance reimburse, or for new debit cards, or to walk through a ton of paperwork to have charges reversed.

Already they were interviewing a woman who saw a $1200 debit from her bank account to the Microsoft store. I’d hope Microsoft would be compliant, see that the item was shipped somewhere that didn’t match the name and address on the card, and report it law enforcement. The times I’ve had my credit card number stolen, though, there was no investigation, no one wanted to mitigate the loss. I had to file a federal complaint for eBay to reverse an $830 charge, and they refused to tell me who used my credit card (“We protect our customers’ privacy, sir.”) Law enforcement asked if I got my money back, and after that, they didn’t care.

I’m strongly thinking about doing what one suggested, just get rid of the cards and use a pre-paid card where needed.


#9

Well the truth is no place that accepts debit or credit cards is safe from this type of hack attack with the creation of a world wide computer network that any one can use to hack into any computer on the network. Computer security is almost impossible since there is always some way to hack into a computer network.

Using credit cards with 0 fraud liability is safest for the consumer. I never make payments by check any more. I always use money orders since today most people that accept checks submit them via computer rather then deposit them in the bank. That is another security hole that crooks can expose.

Be safe out there and watch your six!


#10

Agreed. People can get all mad at Target and say they won’t shop there anymore (presumably to simply go and use their credit/debit card somewhere else instead), but they won’t be avoiding the risk. Any retailers is at risk; it just happened to be Target this time.

If you like Target, then shop there. If you don’t, don’t. This really shouldn’t change your preference. In fact, Target will probably have slightly better security now since they’ve been burned once. They’ll be more vigilant, which still only gets them so far, since you can’t really stop this from happening, but you can try to not be the low-hanging fruit.

The only way to truly avoid it is to go cash/pre-paid card.


#11

my son got burned in this hack. Lost $250 of his college money. Hopefully we will get it back. He was so down though and blamed himself. His debit card is for things he might need and he never spent more than $10 at a time. I hope they catch these guys and send them to jail for a long time.


#12

You bring up a good point, everytime Ive bought something with a credit card, online and needed to have it shipped, they make sure the address matches the cards owner, it is strange in this case, that didnt seem to take place…hmmmm?

On the news this morning, they make it a point to say Target is cooperating with law enforcement, that made me laugh, what can law enforcement even do here, since the theft took place overseas?!! It is pretty much pointless and a waste of money for them to even investigate further.


#13

That’s a pain. :frowning: It’s certainly not your son’s fault, though!

My in-laws had shopped at Target during this window of time, but thankfully hadn’t used their credit card.

Certainly, the consumers didn’t do anything wrong and it’s not really fair that they have to do extra work just to regain that security. But if I had shopped there, I wouldn’t want to wait around for a false charge to appear. I’d be getting a new card.


#14

Holly where can you get these?

I never use my debit card online but I do my credit cards and once had them stolen.


#15

[quote="vsedriver, post:11, topic:348661"]
I hope they catch these guys and send them to jail for a long time.

[/quote]

Not going to happen, they said it was done in another country, likely China, Heck, the Govt over there may be involved, so no one will get in trouble over this...they know this too, thats why this kind of thing will only continue and probably happen alot more often.

It is sad, but nothing law enforcement can do, just sit back and watch the fall out.


#16

Sometimes I wonder why anyone thought it would be a good idea to invent the Internet! I can recall working on USAF weapon systems back in the dinosaur days. Our network was over secure private buried cables with no outside access. And if anyone tapped into the cable, the location could be pinpointed and the perpetrated arrested.

Now, we have an unsecure network over which we share our most private data and our private and personal information along with reams of financial information. Unsecure because it travels through public networks, publicly accessible lines and wireless networks which can be tapped into at many points worldwide. No matter how we encrypt, there are those who will steal our private data. Heck, Google and Facebook and many others, make a profitable business of selling our data!


#17

Its the responsibility of banks to secure their clients. this crime happening more powerful in these days.


#18

[quote="JimG, post:16, topic:348661"]
Sometimes I wonder why anyone thought it would be a good idea to invent the Internet! I can recall working on USAF weapon systems back in the dinosaur days. Our network was over secure private buried cables with no outside access. And if anyone tapped into the cable, the location could be pinpointed and the perpetrated arrested.

Now, we have an unsecure network over which we share our most private data and our private and personal information along with reams of financial information. Unsecure because it travels through public networks, publicly accessible lines and wireless networks which can be tapped into at many points worldwide. No matter how we encrypt, there are those who will steal our private data. Heck, Google and Facebook and many others, make a profitable business of selling our data!

[/quote]

Yep, the internet has been a God send to criminals! They are taking more money, from more people than they have ever been able to do before, plus it can be done worldwide, so no worries about being arrested! No risk at all!!!


#19

Is that what you really meant to say :stuck_out_tongue:


#20

[quote="Djames581, post:17, topic:348661"]
Its the responsibility of banks to secure their clients. this crime happening more powerful in these days.

[/quote]

The banks did nothing wrong here. It was Target who failed to secure its systems. In a similar case several years ago, TJX Companies had to pay out over $300 million in damages to the banks who first reimbursed their customers. TJX is the parent company of TJ Max, Marshalls, and Home Goods.


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