Using the Dominican Breviary (1961)

I have a quite strange question. I have a Dominican Breviary (1961), and I would like to pray from it. Am I allowed to pray the breviary according to Dominican use, but not being a dominican friar or a third order member myself?

Thank you all!

Unless you have an obligation to something else (you belong to a different order), sure - go for it. I’m not sure the 1961 version is the last official version of the old Dominican Rite, so it might/might not be the most liturgically appropriate from that standpoint, but it’s otherwise fine.

I think you would be free to pray it as a personal devotion… but I’m not sure you would be participating in the liturgy of the Church.

This is a question I have in general regarding various ediions of LOTH.
Is there just one edition that everyone in a certain country must all pray in order for it to be part of the liturgy of the Church?
Or are there a number of approved editions, and if so, is there a list of them somewhere?

I believe each country has its own approved LOTH that everyone uses. For example, the USA has its own edition as does Great Britain. I think there are some exceptions to this- some monastic communities might have a longer, more extensive Breviary, but I’m not entirely sure.

However, with Summorum Pontificum, the 1961/1962 version of the Breviary is authorized for use as well. The question becomes whether the EF breviaries specific to religious communities are also allowed.

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There are certainly more than 1 per country. Religious orders often have their own that carry equal stature as approved versions. As far as a list, though, I’m not aware of one.

It’s also allowed, but for those religious. I don’t believe it grants any allowance for it to be used outside of members of that Order.

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Some editions cover multiple countries. For instance the ICEL edition covers both the US and English-speaking Canada. The AELF edition covers several francophone nations, including France, French Canada, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Belgium and North Africa.

Then some religious orders have their own editions. Some use the LOTH, but with their own calendars of saints. The Benedictines have their own Thesaurus Liturgiae Monasticae, which proposes several schemas completely different from the LOTH (usually on either a 1-week or 2-week cycle instead of 4-week).

Those bound, and the laity in general, should pray the LOTH approved for their home country, if not attached to a religious order. Those attached, like Benedictine Oblates or third orders, can pray the breviary of their order. For oblates of our abbey, we can use either the monastic breviary they use, one of the other approved monastic schemas, or the LOTH. I tend to do the latter with a Benedictine twist: Benedictine calendar and a few monastic touches like the Kyrie Eleison between the intercessions and the Pater Noster, and Compline in directum without antiphons.

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