Very specific question for anyone with type 1 diabetes


#1

I’m hoping there are some adults out there or parents with older kids who can help me. (this might not make sense to anyone without D)

my son is going to be making his first communion next month. He has type 1. My problem is this. his 1st communion is at 11am. Normally he snacks around 9:30 or so and even though this is his lowest time during the day, usually we’re ok with giving snack and I can turn his pump down a tad bit if we’re having trouble at that time. But he also gets low when he gets nervous and I’m assuming he’s going to be a bundle of nerves that day. So my plan was to check him right before the kids process into church and carb him up if needed. But then I realized that he’d be violating the 1 hour pre-communion rule. And I’m at a loss. Is there some sort of exception for people who need to eat for medical reasons? Obviously we’d do everything we could to make sure we didn’t have to have a snack, but it happens. And obviously if he’s getting low I can’t just not carb him up.

Anyone have any guidance on this?


#2

No specific advice… but I’d mention this to your priest for a definitive answer…

Usually, medical issues are always exceptions, so I wouldn’t stress it too much! :thumbsup:


#3

Don’t worry, there are exceptions for people with health problems that stop them from doing the fast properly.
Tell your priest.


#4

Here’s an article on the Eucharistic Fast (in fact, the whole Holy Communion rules and regs) from right here at Catholic Answers.

And here’s Book III, Canon 918, Point 3, which states the “infirm” which includes Type I Diabetes do not have to fast.


#5

Those with juvenile diabetes should never fast. It can be dangerous and unwise. Diabetic routines should not be broken. However, today, insulin is much better than it was when I was a boy. There is much leeway these days. But fasting is a no-no. Of course, one hour is not much but still your son needs to see that his schedule is important and should not be changed. He may get the wrong idea and begin to do so, for other aspects of his life.


#6

[quote="OutinChgoburbs]Here’s an article on the Eucharistic Fast (in fact, the whole Holy Communion rules and regs) from right here at Catholic Answers.

And here’s Book III, Canon 918, Point 3, which states the “infirm” which includes Type I Diabetes do not have to fast.
[/quote]

Perfect! Thank you!!!

actually Why me, he’s on an insulin pump and therefore we don’t have to follow any eating schedule at all - so in that regard it’s VERY nice, so no danger of him taking advantage of the situation in other areas, we just bolus for the food he’s eating whenever that may be. :slight_smile: Which is why I think if he CAN avoid not eating for an hour before it’s important to do so, heck with a pump he can even skip a meal or eat very tiny amounts (we LOVE our pump) but I was just wondering if there are exceptions for a case where he simply must eat, and I guess there are. I love that everyone is so knowledgeable and knows exactly where to find the answers. :slight_smile:


#7

Good to hear. I am sure that the pump can work wonders. There are exception because of health-related matters. It must be so.

Insulin today can be wondrous. I know that with my insulin I could probably fast for a long time if I wished to. I just need to take a long acting insulin without the quick acting insulin…I would be fine, I think.

Today your son can feel normal. When I was a teenager everything was so regulated that it was difficult. I still thank heaven for diet sodas.


#8

I just wanted to say that my son is Type 1 also.:hug1:

We didn’t have to deal with the First Communion issue, because he was diagnosed the year after.

Not trying to hijack, but you mentioned your son gets low when he is nervous. My son has been being bullied at school. He has been having unexplained lows at school, but at home he is fine. I mentioned that perhaps the emotional stres might be affecting his sugars, but was told by the nurse that stress impacts the blood sugars by elevating it, not lowering it.

If stress does lower blood sugar, this could explain his mid afternoon lows (only at school) and when there are no extenuating factors such as gym or recess.:shrug:

Thank you, sorry for digressing.


#9

Hi Ana no need to apologize!! AT ALL. Yes, stress normally does rise their bg’s but it also can make them go low, it’s not all that unusual. :slight_smile:
I’d encourage you, if you don’t already, to head over to the forums at Children with Diabetes. It’s full of a whole ton of great parents and so many different experiences that if you were to post your question in about 5 min you’d have at leat 20 people saying “oh yeah, we get lows from stress too!” lol. It’s sooo…normalizing. :slight_smile:

whyme: yes, on a pump, you don’t have that long acting but the short acting that is delivered every 3 min acts as a long acting as the basal insulin, and then more short acting is given as needed with food, the same as you do, so the basal can be tailor set to a person’s own individual basal pattern. It’s really nice.


#10

I would agree that a hypoglycemic episode would be concerning. Since he is pumping, how about setting a temporary basal setting for that morning. You could set it for 70-75% of his normal basal until after communion. Check right before mass and right after. I hope this helps. I would rather he run a little higher for that short period of time than experience a significant low. You gotta love those pumps. Good luck. We are going through first communion, also. Thankfully, none of my children have diabetes. I am a certified diabetes educator with a brother with type 1.


#11

Thanks for chiming in Tam!!! Yeah, I think letting him be a little high will probably be the thing to do. Just so we all feel more secure about it.

You know how it is, now that I’m worried about him being low his D will decide that that’s a good day to be like everyone else and he’ll go sky high from the nerves instead, then the poor thing will be needing to go pee in the middle of mass. Good grief, he’ll be the only child with blood smears on his white robe. I’m only half LOL’ing on that. note to me, remember the tissues


#12

Many prayers and blessings for your son on his special day.:smiley:


#13

First Communion is this coming Sunday here. I am a nervous wreck, too. My daughter is extremely sensitive to tastes, and if she does not like the taste of something, she will politely say “No thank you.” We are having a rehearsal with unconsecratd bread and wine so that the kids know what to expect. I can just see her walking up to father Sunday, crossing her arms and saying “No, thank you” instead of taking the eucharist. I sure can’t wait for this weekend. I am so excited.

God bless you and your family. Take lots of pictures!


#14

Oh boy - good luck! I’m sure it will go fine. God bless your family as well. Apparently it is common (the taste issue) because our parish also practices with unconsecrated hosts so that the kids can taste them first. A few weeks ago they practiced with pretzels. The CCD teacher was going to use single m&m’s but she said “oh the pretzles are so much better for your son” uggh…10 carb heavy pretzels, high on the glycemic scale, later…he’s a lovely 270. ARGGG. The single m&m’s would have been better. lol


#15

The general population does not understand Diabetes or food allergies :slight_smile: or other special diet issues and sometimes it would take way too much to teach them, other times you have to or the one with the “issue” is at risk of death!

I do believe you have gotten the answer to your question about your son and the day of his First Holy Communion so I just want to with you all well (all parents of First Communicants and the First Communcants). Our children in my little Mission Parish will be receiving their FHC on May 4 at the 11 a.m. Mass! I know they are getting excited.

Brenda V.


closed #16

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