Video games and online chats


#21

[quote="hilarycotter, post:10, topic:225287"]

Catholic90 - I am baffled and intrigued by your statement that you let your children in grade 5 research something on the internet.

I do not see the difference between letting them do this on the internet doing this from the text books that we supply them with.

In your opinion what are they missing by not doing research on the internet?

My fear is addiction issues on their parts, and basically unsupervised computer time. The internet has a very dark side - ie pornography which it is dangerous for young boys to encounter.

[/quote]

Well, I teach in a Catholic School. Each student must write several smaller essays of different topics throughout the year, ending with a longer essay on a topic of their choosing which they must have researched. They must learn to site the sources, and they must have both a book AND an Internet source (at least one of each).

As we all know, things change very fast, and depending on what they are writing their essays on, the Internet has much more up to date information than a book.

If you are afraid of porn, put a filter on your computer or make the computer centrally located so you can see what they are doing at all times. Install a time limit. They can each play for ______ time each day.


#22

No offense, but you sound very controlling. I’ve seen very little good come from kids who have been so controlled into their teen years. Major rebellion coming your way.


#23

Catholic90 - thanks for your comments (including the controlling one - have to think about that one:)).

A couple of questions for you 1) when you say you have your grade 5 students write reports, how many words are we talking about? 2) secondly, if I choose to defer my children researching topics on the internet to write reports, how long do you think it would take for them to learn this skill? 3) how many hours do you let your children play online games a day? Have you ever worried about them spending too much time on line?

I had not realized there was strategy in these multi-player games. I think we must be talking about different games - can you refer me to the ones that incorporate strategy? From what I have observed teams form in these multi-player games and they battle opposing teams, but I do not see any strategy or tactics in them. No one leads or tells anyone to do anything, it is totally uncoordinated - sort of the way Boudica led her troops.

Incidentally both my wife and myself were former teachers. We home school as we know how abysmal the public school system is. My 7 yo is reading Pipi Longstocking. Most of them complete their school day in 3-4 hours. We have them for the best part of their day and they have no homework. Most of my children are on target to complete their education when they are 15. We plan on doing some college at home. Its not primarily a control issue, more a lifestyle choice:)


#24

#25

Again, thanks for your input Catholic90.

You should be very proud of your sons:)

Hilary


#26

Gaming can make a better world


#27

This is interesting. My question to you is how can we monetize this so my children will be able to provide for their families?

My real question focuses around how much time my son/daughter should be allowed to play video games a day when left to their own resources they will play all day.

Perhaps I am being too controlling when I think I should limit this to perhaps one hour. What really bothers me is that this is their number one interest in life at this time. I can live with the perhaps 1 hour a day, but it really bothers me that it seems so addictive to them.

Perhaps online gaming is truly something that will help them to become holy, productive individuals living to the fullest of their potential, but I really don't see this.

So while gaming might truly solve many of the world's problems, I need to raise productive children, and having Combat Arms raise my children does not seem to be a way to accomplish this goal.


#28

Yes, like many things it can have positives, but the many wives today that are finding themselves married to gaming addicts probably are not seeing the benefit first hand.

To the OP you’ve let it in the door. Kicking it out is not going to be easy, so probably making reasonable limits is a much better way to go. Don’t give them a free for all all weekend though. Make it a very set limit and stick to it.

To Catholic90, there are many schools that will not allow 5th graders to do internet based research papers. They prefer to make sure the students have down traditional research before embarking into the internet world, where cut and paste is easier done than often realized.

My children have started internet research papers in grade 7. Even then they were usually required to have non-internet sources as well.


#29

Video game addiction is a serious problem with today's youth. I would cut them off.


#30

[quote="Catholic90, post:22, topic:225287"]
No offense, but you sound very controlling. I've seen very little good come from kids who have been so controlled into their teen years. Major rebellion coming your way.

[/quote]

I think you shouldn't draw conclusions based on your own, obviously very smart and focused sons. Some teens can balance out video games and not become addicted to them. Some have trouble doing schoolwork when the lure of the video game is always beckoning. Some can time-manage so that the video games, FB, etc. come AFTER their schoolwork and after other important things such as work and sports, friends, etc. Some become consumed. Some waste a LOT of time goofing around, and they are usually the kids who can't really afford to goof around because their grades may not be so hot in the first place.

I have one of each, although even the older son, who is studying aerospace engineering, spends a little too much time playing an online FPS game for my liking. It's evidently VERY addictive because he's been playing it with dedication since the day his friend showed it to him. It's not realistic at all, which is good because I don't like the violent games and never have. But back to the subject, our younger son should be spending more time on his studies especially on the weekends but he wants to play this game with his brother more than that. It's very frustrating but since I lost the battle on electronics 5 years ago now, it's really too late for me to jump back in and restrict the younger son. The older one still makes almost a 4.0 but it's not possible for his brother to do that without a great deal of effort (ADHD) and focus.

So long story short, with some kids, playing video games is not a problem, but with some, maybe even most, it can be. I think the OP does need to find a comfort level for his family and not just let the entire camel into the tent just because the nose is already in. Being in a place of leadership with his family does not necessarily mean that his children will rebel, and predicting that is rather negative.


#31

[quote="heart4home, post:28, topic:225287"]
To Catholic90, there are many schools that will not allow 5th graders to do internet based research papers. They prefer to make sure the students have down traditional research before embarking into the internet world, where cut and paste is easier done than often realized.

That may be so. Our school is a Blue Ribbon School. We do not allow cut and paste, as that is plagiarizing, and any student plagiarizing receives a 0. We spend a lot of time discussing plagiarizing, and how it is stealing, which is a sin (we are a Catholic school, so we can bring that aspect in). At my son's high school, every paper must be submitted via "turnitin.com" which scours the papers for plagiarizing.

My children have started internet research papers in grade 7. Even then they were usually required to have non-internet sources as well.

We require 2 non-Internet sources, and 2 Internet sources. They must print out the sources so we can see exactly what they are using. Then they must use MLA citation as well.

[/quote]


#32

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