Views on the Ordinariate

#21

:thumbsup:

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#22

Thanks. I did not realize that. It would certainly open the opportunity for growth. Maybe those who would be drawn to an EF yet want to understand what is said and participate a little more interactively.

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#23

I think there are at least two issues here. Who owns the copyrights to the liturgical prayers and who owns the church buildings. I’ve heard the Anglican/Episcopal Church is renting some of them to the parishioners, but there are quite a few of them so each parish is probably different. It may be that the Common Prayer is in the public domain but I’m not quite sure. These are matters that the ordinary guy in the street probably doesn’t think too much of, but it’s important from the legal and/or financial standpoint.

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#24

It would be wrong for this priest to knowingly commune Anglicans or Episcopalians. Only Catholics and Orthodox are permitted to receive the Holy Eucharist by the Catholic Church. He is also wrong in saying Anglican priests’ orders are valid. Hopefully these issues are addressed and corrected in that parish.

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#25

The buildings is definitely a big concern. Many Anglican Use parishes now share a church with a local Roman Catholic congregation because TEC has kicked them out of their old church, and they couldn’t handle the legalese.

St. Barnabas, here in Omaha, is very lucky. They managed to buy their church for “50 cents on the dollar” - half the price it was worth. That is an extraordinary case.

The Anglican Use does not use the Book of Common Prayer for the regular liturgy. They have their own Mass, and until very recently every parish had kind of their own way of saying the Mass.

Even then, if the situation is anything like St. Barnabas, they keep their Books of Common Prayer and their Hymnals. So, at St. Barnabas, we’ve got dozens of copies of the 1940 Hymnals and of the Common Prayer for Evensong. And you can’t exactly force people not to use books you don’t own, now can you?

I’ve talked to him before. I don’t think he’s mentally come to terms with that, yet. He may not, ever.

Mind you, he and a lot of other Anglicans think Pope Leo XIII was misinformed. And even if the charges against the CofE were true, they are now equally true of our church. It’s a big, complicated issue that’s best addressed by saying, “Whatever the case, the Catholic Church doesn’t recognise Anglican orders”.

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#26

Thanks for the info.

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#27

In the UK the Anglican church has made it quite clear that buildings are not to be shared. (No formal declaration but certain bishops have set the precedent). However, many Catholic parishes have invited the Ordinariate to use their buildings (just as many also allow the Latin Mass Society to use parish churches where the EF is not the norm). A lot of people have found this beneficial to the parish community as a whole. There is one Ordinariate group in the UK who have used a Methodist chapel and are now raising funds to purchase the building, thus establishing a mission base which will be the first of its kind. Further details can be found here: ordinariate.org.uk/groups/torbay.html

Copyright for the BCP is with the Crown, but only in the UK, elsewhere it is in the public domain. Prayers from the BCP have often be included in Catholic devotional books; gaining permission for their use is not a problem.

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#28

It’s interesting that they had put the BCP in the public domain, when they could easily demand royalties for their liturgical use outside the Anglican Church. Selling hymnals to the public I can see.

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#29

I could believe that. :rolleyes: Very aggressive, that Anglican Communion. A detriment to Christian charity, don’t you think?

There is one Ordinariate group in the UK who have used a Methodist chapel and are now raising funds to purchase the building, thus establishing a mission base which will be the first of its kind. Further details can be found here: ordinariate.org.uk/groups/torbay.html

:clapping: Very cool.

Copyright for the BCP is with the Crown, but only in the UK, elsewhere it is in the public domain. Prayers from the BCP have often be included in Catholic devotional books; gaining permission for their use is not a problem.

Thanks for the information. :slight_smile:

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#30

True, but when you’re losing membership and a potential future source of revenue…

That said, I believe the ICEL was a group which was partly made up of Anglicans so I wonder if the royalties collected by the group which translated the Mass back in the 60’s was shared between the two Churches. It is to be noted some still use the “And also with you” responses.

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#31

Even more ironic is that most Anglo-Catholic parishes use the Roman Missal. However, they may omit the prayer for the Pope, move the act of peace etc. - some parts of the Anglican Church may disagree with this, however, since the publication of Common Worship, as long as principle elements are used one may use any rite (Including ones written on the back of an envelope).

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#32

If you’re talking the 1969 RM, the Lutherans too use it, or at least the English (or German) approved translations. Or parts of it. Translations carry their own copyrights.

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#33

Sums it up pretty well.

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closed #34
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