Vocation in State of Mortal Sin


#1

Can one have a true vocation while in a state of mortal sin? While they continue to sin, the frequency of the sin decreases, is this a sign of God working in them, forming them for their vocation?


#2

Here’s my opinion.

Discerning what God’s will is regarding specific callings to priestly/religious/lay life cannot be separated from the practice of doing the will of God. Sin, especially habitual mortal sin, clouds the mind. It is totally incompatible with our ultimate vocation - to be saints - and seriously interferes with the pursuit of true vocations to the priesthood and/or religious life (it also interferes with discernment of marriage!).

That said, I’m not saying you don’t have a “true vocation” to religious/priestly life because you’re struggling with habitual mortal sin (if the frequency is diminishing, wonderful!). But the best thing you can do for your discernment is to pluck out the roots of the habitual mortal sin, to cast out whatever in your life leads you to that sin.

IF the sin you are struggling with is some form of impurity (you don’t have to tell me though!), I highly recommend enrolling in the Angelic Warfare Confraternity of St. Thomas Aquinas, administered by the Dominicans. angelicwarfareconfraternity.org/


#3

You should pray for the grace to overcome that mortal sin since, in mortal sin, nothing you can do is meritorious in the eyes of God. As far as vocation, I suppose it’s true that all of us have a vocation which God has planned for us. In that sense, sure you have a vocation. God might use that vocation to convince you to leave mortal sin.

But if you still live in sin, and you are thinking about vocations like this, then it would be like planning your future while your house burns down around you. You probably should first worry about the immediate threat to your existence.


#4

A vocation is a calling. We are called to a particular mission. Whether or not we accept it does not change the fact that we have one.

So yes, everyone has a vocation. It is independent of our sins.


#5

You’d do well to consider the examples of St. Paul and St. Augustine, men who were early in their life at odds with God, but are perhaps the two greatest theologians who have lived.

The vocation is predestined by God as the means through which we and others might receive the most grace in this life, so as to sanctify us enough for heaven. Mortal sin, however, cuts off our life of grace and makes it impossible for us to respond to it.

God bless.


#6

I dont think St Paul was ever at odds with God. He was at odds with Christianity at first.


#7

I dont think St Paul was ever at odds with God. He was at odds with Christianity at first.


#8

“Saul, why are you persecuting me?” What’s the difference?


#9

From my understanding, Saul was a righteous and devout Jew. He already accepted and loved God, yet at the same time he didn’t understand Christianity until his experience with being blinded by Jesus.


#10

From my understanding, Saul was a righteous and devout Jew. He already accepted and loved God, yet at the same time he didn’t understand Christianity until his experience with being blinded by Jesus.

By all accounts, Annas and Caiaphas were righteous and devout Jews, as were all the Pharisees and Sadducees who plotted against Christ. It wasn’t a mere matter with any of them of not understanding Christ or His Church; it was actually a matter of malice and hatred.


#11

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