Vocation Possibilities


#1

Besides the obvious possibilities (married, celibate single life, Priesthood, Brotherhood) what other vocation options are there for male Catholics?

Or did I get them all?


#2

The diaconate. While a deacon can be either married or celibate, the diaconate is a separate vocation in its own right.


#3

[quote="ZDHayden, post:2, topic:215638"]
The diaconate. While a deacon can be either married or celibate, the diaconate is a separate vocation in its own right.

[/quote]

This is really really rare, but another possibility would be a diocesean hermit.


#4

There are a few more choices:

Diocesan hermit
Religious hermit (like the Carmelite Hermits in Lake Elmo, MN)
Lay orders like Opus Dei or Regnum Christi
Becoming a lay Carmelite, Franciscan, Dominican, Benedictine, etc.
Permanent Diaconate

Also, I believe that being a Director of Religious Education or a Catechist is a very valuable, very necessary vocation.


#5

[quote="DaughterOfMary6, post:4, topic:215638"]

Also, I believe that being a Director of Religious Education or a Catechist is a very valuable, very necessary vocation.

[/quote]

that is my career and job title, but my vocation is marriage. That job can also be held by an ordained person, or consecrated religious, or by a single Catholic.


#6

The three original professions were medicine, law, and theology(i.e. the priesthood). Obviously, though, the last involves more commitment than the first two and is properly called a supernatural vocation.


#7

[quote="DaughterOfMary6, post:4, topic:215638"]
There are a few more choices:

Diocesan hermit
Religious hermit (like the Carmelite Hermits in Lake Elmo, MN)
Lay orders like Opus Dei or Regnum Christi
Becoming a lay Carmelite, Franciscan, Dominican, Benedictine, etc.
Permanent Diaconate

Also, I believe that being a Director of Religious Education or a Catechist is a very valuable, very necessary vocation.

[/quote]

Regnum Christi and Opus Dei are not lay orders.

Regnum Christi is a public association of the faithful. They do not profess the evangelical councils or have a rule of life. The have a spirtuality and a very specific apostole.

Opus Dei is a prelature, not an order. They don't have a specific spirituality, but they do have a specific work.

Secular Franciscans are not a lay order. They are secular, which is different from lay. They have lay people and clerics. They are a canonical autonomous order of Pontifical Right, just like the friars and nuns. But they make profession for life equivalent to that of the friars and nuns.

Benedictines are not a lay order. They are oblates. Oblates do not belong to an order. They belong to an abbey. They commit to that specific abbey for life, even thoug they live in their homes. I'm not sure if they have a profession at all.

The Secular Carmelites and Lay Dominicans also make profession after completing their formation. But they are not orders of Pontifical Right. They are affiliates of the friars.

Each of the above has its own charism, spirituality, ministry, community life and different rights and duties within the Church.

Fraternally

Br. JR, OSF :)


#8

There are communities of friars, monks and secular institutes. They are all institutes of consecrated life, but each has a very distinct lifestlye.

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF :slight_smile:


#9

Visit the sick and the dying and comfort them ......


#10

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