Vocations Question


#1

I went to a retreat where there were many devout Catholic adults whether they were seminarians, priests, sisters, chaperones, musicians.

I am a college student. I observed my feelings about these different groups of faithful Catholics.

I couldn’t see myself living the life of one of the sisters. It seemed kind of lonely to me. Also, I think I would prefer not being cloistered so that I could really, really get out into the world and evangelize. I want to live in the culture to do this so that I can relate to the culture. Point is, I did NOT look at the nuns and say, “I’d like to do that.”

I was quite struck by the musician. He was really faithful, and I know he’s married with kids. And I thought that was cool that he had a Catholic family unit. I want to raise kids in the faith. And I want a husband to encourage me in my faith and I want to do the same for him. I usually daydream about what it would be like to have my own little Catholic family.

Do these different feelings show that my vocation is marriage?


#2

[quote="Angela77, post:1, topic:332314"]
I went to a retreat where there were many devout Catholic adults whether they were seminarians, priests, sisters, chaperones, musicians.

I am a college student. I observed my feelings about these different groups of faithful Catholics.

I couldn't see myself living the life of one of the sisters. It seemed kind of lonely to me. Also, I think I would prefer not being cloistered so that I could really, really get out into the world and evangelize. I want to live in the culture to do this so that I can relate to the culture. Point is, I did NOT look at the nuns and say, "I'd like to do that."

I was quite struck by the musician. He was really faithful, and I know he's married with kids. And I thought that was cool that he had a Catholic family unit. I want to raise kids in the faith. And I want a husband to encourage me in my faith and I want to do the same for him. I usually daydream about what it would be like to have my own little Catholic family.

Do these different feelings show that my vocation is marriage?

[/quote]

TBH it could all mean nothing and you can't take a single event like this, which seems to not have had an overpowering effect as the deciding event. especially as there seems to be a few assumptions being made about the sisters. there are many different types of sister from cloistered nuns to those who work out in the missions.

Look carefully at all the options and look most closely at the religious life if there may be a call there. I say this because if you remain open to marriage as you look at religious life Our Lord can send "the one" t you and that can be your sign. so until you meet "the one" or after having assessed and discerned the different types of religious life don't close it off completely.


#3

No, these feelings show that you want your vocation to be marriage.


#4

[quote="JM3, post:3, topic:332314"]
No, these feelings show that you want your vocation to be marriage.

[/quote]

:thumbsup:


#5

Looking at Jesus nailed to the Cross it's easy to see that "the way" for each of us might not be what we had planned. It certainly hasn't for me.

You might find that you will be exponentially more lonely if you don't join those sisters.


#6

[quote="Angela77, post:1, topic:332314"]
I went to a retreat where there were many devout Catholic adults whether they were seminarians, priests, sisters, chaperones, musicians.

I am a college student. I observed my feelings about these different groups of faithful Catholics.

I couldn't see myself **living the life of one of the sisters. It seemed kind of lonely to me. Also, I think I would prefer not being cloistered so that I could really, really get out into the world and evangelize. **I want to live in the culture to do this so that I can relate to the culture. Point is, I did NOT look at the nuns and say, "I'd like to do that."

I was quite struck by the musician. He was really faithful, and I know he's married with kids. And I thought that was cool that he had a Catholic family unit*. I want to* raise kids in the faith. And** I want** a husband to encourage me in my faith an*d I want **to do the same for him.* I usually daydream** about what it would be like to have my own little Catholic family.

Do these different feelings show that my vocation is marriage?

[/quote]

We have an all loving God who created us

and truly knows us inside and out

better then we know ourselves

who has a great plan

better then we can ever imagine

In prayer and a closer relationship with God

We can truly discern what God is telling us to be

Good luck

[BIBLEDRB] Jeremiah 1:5[/BIBLEDRB]


#7

I've heard many stories of religious being this close to marriage and starting their own little Catholic family, but received the call. Obviously, it was extremely difficult to break up with the person whom they thought was Mr. or Miss Right (some were even childhood sweethearts!), but they persevered in their calling.

On the other hand, there are people who felt their calling was to be in the religious life, but ended up getting married. The point is, we don't know what someone's vocation may be. You may exhibit traits or inclination to a certain lifestyle, but only you can choose what is best for you.

BTW, just to throw this out there, sometimes people who have a calling to religious life avoid religious like crazy.


#8

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