Voluntary Sterilization and Genetic Illnesses


#1

Should voluntary, elective sterilization be a readily available course of treatment for those who have proven markers that show an elevated probability of producing offspring with debilitating genetic adnormalities?

Is the future suffering presumably avoided (and maybe eradicated) a sufficient justification for sterilization?

What say you?
(Particularly interested in replies that would interest non-Catholics, but don’t let that stop you from sharing your view)


#2

NOPE! NEVER should one’s body be voluntarily mutilated to avoid something that might or might not happen. PLUS who are we to judge that those with genetic disabilities or abnormalities aren’t sent to teach us patience and keep us humble, not to make too much of ourselves and put ourselves above others. The mentally & physically disabled children I worked with for many years taught me a WHOLE HECK OF A LOT MORE than I could ever teach them.


#3

I’m not saying this is right. I’m just stating the facts.

Voluntary sterilization is already available. Many women routinely
get tubal ligations if they don’t want more children of if they are
concerned about producing disabled children. Men get vasectomies
for the same reason. And genetic counseling is also available
to couples. So your question is already answered.

I will now address the ethics of sterilization.
Sterilization is the wrong way to go. Imagine the outcome
if the government started to decide who is disabled. Nazi
Germany demonstrated the sheer evil of this ideology.
In any case, we can be very optimistic about new therapies
that will cure illnesses and other physical maladies
on the genetic level.

As for the religious reasons, I refer you to @CajunJoy65’s
viewpoint:

NOPE! NEVER should one’s body be voluntarily mutilated to avoid something that might or might not happen. PLUS who are we to judge that those with genetic disabilities or abnormalities aren’t sent to teach us patience and keep us humble, not to make too much of ourselves and put ourselves above others. The mentally & physically disabled children I worked with for many years taught me a WHOLE HECK OF A LOT MORE than I could ever teach them.


#4

To be sure, I’m aware of the availability. I was asking “should” from a moral perspective - Particularly as it would appeal to non-catholics.

Thanks for your input.


#5

As many seem to agree with you, do you think your lessons in humility, then, justify their suffering?

We shouldn’t limit suffering in others (even when we can) so as to promote our own spiritual development?


#6

I say “of course”.


#8

My family had a history of infantile polycystic kidney disease. Last I checked, it is fatal 100% of the time within several hours of birth. I lost two siblings to it. There was about a 1:400 chance that my children would’ve been born and died with it.

To be honest, I’m not sure how I feel about voluntary sterilization.


#9

I answered the should part in the second paragraph.:grinning:

As a Catholic, I can’t put forward an argument on this forum
that goes against Church teaching. :angel:

In any case, God bless you.


#10

No. It wouldn’t be okay. Aside from the obvious thing about the Catholic Church (which I adhere to) condemning it, one potential problem I see is that it could lead to the dehumanizing of people with disorders that cause suffering. Before you call it a slippery slope fallacy, look at how artificial birth control has contributed to the abortion debate. Children are seen as something to avoid instead of gifts from God, people to be loved and cherished. It is a good thing to want to end suffering, but to do so by going against what is good and ordered by God would be to commit evil.

If someone really wants to avoid having children, whether it be for the reason you mentioned or for any other reason, let him/her avoid marriage and sex.

Note: I’m not saying that it would be easy to avoid marriage and sex. Those two things are part of our nature, they are natural desires, indeed they are some of the strongest desires in our lives. But it would be the right thing to do. The right thing to do isn’t always easy, but we are not called to the easy life. We are called to live right lives.


#11

I lost 3 nephews to Duchenes Muscular Dystrophy after YEARS of suffering. I believe all 3 are Saints in Heaven. NOT our decision to decide who dies, who lives, who gets the terrible diseases or disorders. Were we God we could male those decisions but we are NOT GOD! As far as sparing someone suffering for life whose to say we would know if we had spared them suffering or not if they weren’t allowed to LIVE first.


#12

Do you NOT know who knows ALL. ONLY God. HOW many times have mothers been told by doctors to abort their babies because they appear to have Down’s Syndrome or a birth defect and in MANY cases the mother’s refuse abortion, have their babies, their babies are perfectly healthy and many times have no birth defect at all. Same thing to prevent something you’re not sure a child you have might get. GOD IS IN CHARGE of life and death for a reason. We are not privy to ALL God knows and the reason He does things the way He does. I am NOT about to question God or His reasoning behind anything especially why some people are born with some issues that might cause suffering.


#13

I see no ethical downside, unless possible side effects (if there are any) of the sterilization are not communicated by doctor.

Not using scientific knowledge to make a better society seems ignorant.


#14

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