Walmart shoppers' Christmas spirit?

A Walmart employee trampled to death:

channels.isp.netscape.com/pf/story.jsp?flok=FF-APO-1310&idq=/ff/story/0001%2F20081128%2F1537742109.htm&sc=1310&floc=NI-mo3

2000 people in line, some waiting since 9 pm the night before.

People did not stop to help the employee as he lay on the ground, and they pushed against other Wal-Mart workers who were trying to aid the man. The crowd kept running into the store even after the police arrived, jostling and pushing officers who were trying to perform CPR, the police said.

iht.com/articles/2008/11/28/business/29walmart.php

Yet another reason why I’m wont to call it Inbred-Mart. I mean, SERIOUSLY–what cretin sees an obviously wounded/dying person and chooses a cheap flatscreen over the person?

Shame on them. :mad:

I seriously doubt this behavior is limited to Walmart shoppers. From the story I read, police were called to control the Walmart crowd about an hour before the stampede, but were then called to deal with incidents at other local big box stores.

That poor man. Now his family has to grieve his loss because a bunch of animals (sorry, but animals stampede, not humans, and the actual animals usually have a good reason for doing so) had to have their flat-screen TV deals.

From the New York Times:

Nikki Nicely, 19, wanted a television — a 40-inch Samsung flat-screen, to be exact, on sale for $798, marked down from $1,000, and available for a limited time in the wee hours of Friday morning at the Wal-Mart store in Columbus, Ohio.

So, at 4:40 a.m., when a fellow shopper tried to pry away the box she had been guarding for an hour, Ms. Nicely did not play nice. She jumped onto the man’s back and began to pound his shoulders, screaming, “That’s my TV! That’s my TV!”

A police officer and security guard intervened but not before Ms. Nicely took an elbow in the face. Still, when the dust settled, she had her hand on the box. “That’s right,” she cried as the man walked away. “This here is my TV!”

Welcome to Black Friday.

Disgusting. :banghead:

Apparently two people were shot and killed at a Toys’R’Us store.

I just don’t comprehend all of this madness over buying things, especially the day after Thanksgiving. :shrug:

This was the first thing I read this morning. This country has a disease. So many people are really, really sick.

It’s simple really . . . we value things more than people.

man cannot worship both god and money,our nations hysterical need for the next toy,tv,gadget,whatever is truly mindboggling we are a nation of lemmings,slaves to consumerism,LORD HAVE MERCY!

It’s starting to feel a lot like Christmas.

A half-dozen Wal-Mart employees lined up in the entryway trying to hold back the crowd by pushing against the locked sliding doors, but they were overwhelmed by the force of the crowd, Lieutenant Fleming said.

iht.com/articles/2008/11/28/business/29walmart.php

The employees should not have been instructed (or even allowed) to do this. Six people pushing against locked doors to keep out 2000 people!

Here are my thoughts. Crowds like this are created, they just don’t form. Mob mentality is a sociological phemonemon that can happen when a lot of people get together for the same purpose, with emotional focus. For many people buying Christmas presents, or even getting a good deal, is an emotional venture. The stores that have these early morning specials for a limited time only (or for a limited amount of people, such as the first 100) create this frenzy and the news media stirs it up for at least a couple of days before. Then, of course, constant commercials on TV remind people to get over there and “beat the crowd”. I noticed that the above article said that, although the police were called earlier when the crowd began to grow, they had to leave to keep order at other stores with other crowds.

Is this just the bad side of human nature or is this something that we as a society, a country, allow to happen? If you are over 30 or 40 years old, I bet you don’t remember these “door buster” early morning deals happening the day after Thanksgiving as you were growing up. No. Stores used to open earlier by an hour or two and stay open later an hour or two. Sure, there were great sales the day after Thanksgiving. But creating competition between shoppers to be the first ones in the doors to grab limited deals didn’t happen until, oh, about 12 or 15 years ago. And when it first started it was like, be the first 100 in the store and receive a free gift.

Retailers need to create competition between themselves without creating so much competition between customers. People are just falling for this easy game that retail management has been playing. I don’t think it is entirely the fault of the people who end up in front of a Wal-Mart at 3 a.m. or whatever. (Although it would be more intelligent to not fall for that and to keep your priorities straight.) It’s an easy game for the retailer. You, as a customer, should not have to camp out in front of a store all night and into the morning, push through a crowd, run through a store, and stake your claim on a TV or other merchandise, fighting off other customers, in a certain time in order to get a special deal. The retailers should be the ones working hard and fighting to get your money, not the other way around.

Wal-Mart wanted their customers to go on a hunt for bargains. They wanted them hungry. They wanted them stirred up and excited to come in and beat each other to get what they wanted. And the news media also wants that so they have stories, for days before and days after. People act like animals when they are encouraged to do so. Not saying that everyone falls for this, maybe just misguided people. Obviously, many of them misguided about what Christmas (and Thanksgiving) is all about.

Someone lost a life because a store wanted to stir up a frenzy and then didn’t know how to handle what they created. What happened at this Wal-Mart should be a signal to lawmakers (and news stations) that the retailers have gone so far now that they are creating mob mentality on their premises and putting customers and employees in danger. Laws need to be changed so that this craziness ends. This is my point of view. Having worked in retail from 1985 to 1999, I know there is a better way.

This is the fruit of secularism and commericailism :rolleyes:

This should have been a bad black comedy sketch on a satirical show, or a fake article in the Onion. Instead, it’s real.
The topper: the store shut down a good couple of hours after learning the guy died, then reopened. This guy’s life wasn’t even worth losing a day’s business.
Shame on corporate America, and greedy American consumers.

Yep. The diseases of Materialism and Relativism.

This is why I consider myself a Distributist (which is not a Socialist)and not a Global Capitalist.

I took black Friday as an opportunity to protest consumerism and I volunteered at an animal shelter. Stories like this make me sick to my stomach.

God bless this man and his family. :frowning:

People talk about how the poor keep gettting shafted in this country, now take a look at this incident and you can see how rich and wealthy this country is.

This was not a stampede for food or water, no, it was a riot and to see who can get the latest big screen 1000 dollar TV. A literal riot of thousands of people.

I’m not buying people are starving in the streets and standing in soup lines, or wondering where their next check is coming from. You have to work really hard to be poor in this country.

All the proof I need is at this Wal Mart in NY.

It was a sad day when a mob was more interested in the latest bluetooth gadget then a life. I reckon they call it consumerism run amuck.


****I have always wondered what if God would walk this earth, this very minute. How ashamed we would all be. For most people; the anniversary of the birth of Christ is nothing but a means to buy in excess, drink and eat in excess, and trying to outshine their neighbors in lights, decorations, and gift giving. I doubt many households celebrate the true meaning of Christmas or celebrate in church. I know this sounds negative but the Walmart story is one of millions of stories over a 40 yr. spread (in my lifetime) that
reinforces the need to come back to the church and forget about selfish, narcissistic, god less lifestyles. My husband and I lost a lot of money during this economic crisis. You know what? I’m glad. We work more but we value the dollar more and thank God we are healthy and thankful for our daughters. This Christmas?
We’ll go to church and find something creative to make as gifts for all of our loved ones. I bet they will mean a lot more-they’ll be from the heart not the wallet.

Having worked with the St. Vincent de Paul at my conference in the past and having recently spoken to a current Vincentian, I can assure you that there are many people who are out of work or mentally/physically disabled who are going hungry, who are skipping medicine to buy food or vice versa, who have their heat shut off because to pay their mortgage/rent they need to skip their other bills, who are evicted and have nowhere else to go. These are not the people stampeding for flat-screen TVs. They don’t stampede at all- there’s not much point.

How nice for you that you have not been exposed to the truly poor. What a sheltered life you must lead. :banghead:

Having worked with the St. Vincent de Paul at my conference in the past and having recently spoken to a current Vincentian, I can assure you that there are many people who are out of work or mentally/physically disabled who are going hungry, who are skipping medicine to buy food or vice versa, who have their heat shut off because to pay their mortgage/rent they need to skip their other bills, who are evicted and have nowhere else to go. These are not the people stampeding for flat-screen TVs. They don’t stampede at all- there’s not much point.

How nice for you that you have not been exposed to the truly poor. What a sheltered life you must lead.

I suggest before ya jump to conclusions ya check the obvious.

I was assigned to a fire station in the ghetto part of my city for over 20 years, where people lived in absolute squalor, and death tugged at your elbow everyday.

I’ve been in more ghetto apts, shacks, box houses then I care to remember. Apts where the garbage can was the kitchen floor., and the toilet was the bathtub, because the water was turned off. Seen it all. I knew most of the people in our district by name, as we were the only medical care they had. We delivered their babies and removed their dead. It was not unusual for someone to die and not be found for a week, and the stinch coming from the apt was not big deal because it ALWAYS SMELLED THAT way. My 20 yeas of working those streets taught me several things, one of which was just a little effort, they could pull themselves out, but it was too much like work, so they didn’t. Most of it could be cured by the following.

Stop having babies without fathers

go to school and get a education

go out and get a JOB, if its flippin burgers

clean the place up and live like people

stop walking around with your pants down

Now the folks you come in contact prolly don’t fit that scenario. For sure there are some who no fault of their own fell through the cracks and I’m for helping them, but you gotta seperate them from the description some wanna call poor.

I’m not telling ya what you know is not true, but what I am saying the majority of poor in this country are someones definitaion of poor because they don’t have cable tv.

I find your attitude very hateful, critical, and mean-spirited.

Okay, you’re going to have to tell me how this is so. I don’t see it. Except for the critical but no one has avoided that on this forum.

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