Warning

[107.] In accordance with what is laid down by the canons, “one who throws away
the consecrated species or takes them away or keeps them for a sacrilegious purpose, incurs a latae sententiae excommunication reserved to the Apostolic See; a cleric, moreover, may be punished by another penalty, not excluding dismissal from the clerical state”.[194] To be regarded as pertaining to this case is any action that is voluntarily and gravely disrespectful of the sacred species. Anyone, therefore, who acts contrary to these norms, for example casting the sacred species into the sacrarium or in an unworthy place or on the ground, incurs the penalties laid down.[195] Furthermore all will remember that once the distribution of Holy Communion during the celebration of Mass has been completed, the prescriptions of the Roman Missal are to be observed, and in particular, whatever may remain of the Blood of Christ must be entirely and immediately consumed by the Priest or by another minister, according to the norms, while the consecrated hosts that are left are to be consumed by the Priest at the altar or carried to the place for the reservation of the Eucharist.[196]

Coming From the Chatechism

Warning recieving communion unworthily is serious and has penalties.

Wrong quote.

That law is specific to desecration of the Eucharist, not unworthy reception.

Desecration of the Eucharist carries penalties. Unworthy reception, while gravely sinful, does not.

To be reguarded as pertainig to this case is any action that is voluntary and gravely disrespectful.

Reception in an unworthy manner is gravely disrespectfull.

This is the THIRD thread you’ve started in the last two weeks with the EXACT same topic. And three times now people have given you the correct information.

You need some spiritual counsel if you are so obsessed with this you are unwilling to listen to knowledgeable people who have already told you that you are misapplying canon law in this situation.

It is NOT talking about receiving communion in a state of sin or “unworthily” in any way, shape or form.

Please get some help from your pastor.

What you are stating is your own opinion based on how you understand the words “gravely disrespectful.” But that very section you quote from has a footnote, number 195. And that footnote references a* dubium* that was responded to in 1999, and which can be found addressed in this article.

The phrase “any action” in that sentence is rooted in the very question of the dubium: whether the canon condemned only “throwing away” the Sacred Host or whether it meant a generic profanation.

The response to the dubium is summarized:

" The verb abicit should not be understood only in the strict sense of throwing away, nor in the generic sense of profaning, but with the broader meaning of to scorn, disdain, demean. Therefore,a grave offence of sacrilege against the Body and Blood of Christ is committed by anyone who takes away and/or keeps the Sacred Species for a sacrilegious (obscene, superstitious, irreligious) purpose, and anyone who, even without removing them from the tabernacle, monstrance or altar, makes them the object of any external, voluntary and serious act of contempt. Anyone guilty of this offence incurs, in the Latin Church, the penalty of excommunication latae sententiae (i.e., automatically), the absolution of which is reserved to the Holy See … ."

“Gravely disrespectful,” it appears, should therefore be understood as a “grave offense of sacrilege.” Thinking about baseball while receiving the Sacred Host is not quite what is in mind here, IMO.

Actually, Holy Scripture says the same- that there are severe penalties to a soul when The Holy Eucharist is taken in an unworthy state.

1 Cor. 11:26-29, “For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until He comes. 27 Therefore whoever eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner, shall be guilty of the body and the blood of the Lord. 28 But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of the bread and drink of the cup. 29 For he who eats and drinks, eats and drinks judgment to himself, if he does not judge the body rightly.”

You are correct in that scripture does give a warning about unworthy reception. You are incorrect in equating the reception and desecration, and the two warnings given are distinctly different.

“Penalties” are not something defined in Scripture. They are defined in Canon Law. They are not to be confused with consequences, such as the temporal and eternal punishments due to sin.

Penalties are imposed by the Church for violations of canon law that constitute ecclesiastical crimes. These include excommunication, interdict, suspension, dismissal from the clerical state and “other just penalties.”

What the OP quoted was a specific crime according to canon law: the desecration (such as disposal) of the sacred species. It does not cover unworthy reception. Unworthy reception is a sin, and as a sin, is subject to divine punishment. But it is not a crime according to the Church’s canon law, and as such, carries no ecclesiastical penalty. One can repent and confess an unworthy/sacrilegious reception of Communion. One cannot just confess the crime of desecration because it incurs an excommunication, which must first be lifted before the person can be absolved.

It does no one a service to quote one thing to justify another. The two are not the same thing. One is desecration of the Eucharist, a mortal sin and a crime punishable by excommunication. The other is unworthy reception, which is also a grave sin, but is not a crime.

I know the fears of not being sure if you are a Catholic in “good standing” with the Church. It took me several years, dozens of confessions, deep thought, discussion regarding my grave sins (which I was absolved from) and a few other measures until I finally concluded with asking a priest, “simply, am I in good standing with the Church” to which I was told yes, and re-verified, “so I am acceptable to receive communion?” And the answer was indeed yes. When in doubt, go through reconciliation and discuss your journey, the answer will help.

What the OP quoted was a specific crime according to canon law: the desecration (such as disposal) of the sacred species. It does not cover unworthy reception. Unworthy reception is a sin, and as a sin, is subject to divine punishment. But it is not a crime according to the Church’s canon law, and as such, carries no ecclesiastical penalty. One can repent and confess an unworthy/sacrilegious reception of Communion. One cannot just confess the crime of desecration because it incurs an excommunication, which must first be lifted before the person can be absolved.

Isnt sacrilige defined as to desecrate profane or treat unworthy of.

But that particular canon, particularly given the clarification provided by the footnote and dubium, is abundantly clear that it is not referring to any and all instances of sacrilege, nor any and all instances of unworthy reception of communion, but a very specific and relatively narrow category of acts.

No.

Desecration is a sacrilege, but not all sacrilege is desecration.

Sacrilege is the unworthy treatment of something or someone holy. This includes the unworthy reception of the sacraments.

Desecration is a subset of sacrilege that is more serious because it entails the actual physical abuse of the sacred thing such that its sacred character is completely disregarded and insulted (hence de-secration). For the Eucharist, this means physically taking the Blessed Sacrament, discarding it, using it in occult rituals, urinating on it, spitting it out. Merely receiving it in an unworthy state entails none of that, and is in fact still done with the communicant at least virtually aware that this is still a sacred Host. It is therefore not desecration. It does not carry a penalty. It IS still a mortal sin.

Lord Jesus Christ,
Help us devoutly with firm purpose of amendment
be worthy to recite Your Statues and receive You
in Holy Communion for Love of You and neighbor,
following The Gospel of Life.
Amen.

2120 Sacrilege consists in profaning or treating unworthily the sacraments and other liturgical actions, as well as persons, things, or places consecrated to God. Sacrilege is a grave sin especially when committed against the Eucharist, for in this sacrament the true Body of Christ is made substantially present for us.52

OP, the section you just quoted is irrelevant.

The footnote quoted by SimpleRosarian quite clearly refers to EXTERNAL (ie something that would be obvious to an outside observer) acts of contempt towards the Eucharist.

Unworthy reception, grave though it is, is ordinarily a purely internal act. An external act would have to be something such as spitting out the Eucharist or grinding it underfoot.

Just stop.

You’ve been educated. Adhere to the Church’s definitions and stop trying to impose your own.

Enough.

2120 Sacrilege consists in profaning or treating unworthily the sacraments and other liturgical actions, as well as persons, things, or places consecrated to God. Sacrilege is a grave sin especially when committed against the Eucharist, for in this sacrament the true Body of Christ is made substantially present for us.52

First of all this is the churches definition of sacrilige.

The scriptures also talk about unworthy reception as profanation.

You are in fact committing a generic form of Sacrilege here by treating the proper interpretation of the canons of church law, a thing consecrated to God, by those with degrees in and knowledge of Canon Law, by profaning or treating unworthily those interpretations.

STOP IT!

You are wrong and not qualified to make this determination.

You have now been educated by a deacon, one in Holy Orders and magnitudes more qualified than you are.

You better stop it now.

I get it now one thing I do want to say though is that I think I was confusing the sin of sacrilige with the offence of sacrilige.

The sin of sacrilige could be anything from recieving unworthily to withholding information in the confessional

The offence of sacrilige is deliberately breaking some cannon law that has penalties attached to it.

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