Was Martin Luther Protestant?

Martin Luther believed that Mary was sinless, and that she was Assumed into Heaven. He also believed she was ever-virgin. He also believed that articifical contraception was sinful, as was masturbation.

He also believed that many books of the New Testament (James, Hebrews, Revelation, and others) were uninspired.

Luther clearly was not a Protestant. Nor was he a Catholic.

Luther was simply a Christian, and did not belong to any denomination that exists today.

W8 anyone that posts a complaint on a church door over a doctrine and then whips out a bible to say what the church teaches is wrong is a protestant. He is protesting, grrrrr… like Mrs. Mean Lady… :mad:

Do not know much about Lutheranism but Lutherans in Estonia look like Catholic churches. Much veneration for Mary, for Communion, recognition of sinfulness of sexual impurity. But these are all the same Protestants - just not like American Baptists, English Methodist or French Hugenots. But they are devote followers I guess of Martin Luther’s religion. (Sounds odd and insulting to Lutherans but that is how I understand it).

Last I hear, Luther was a Catholic, and I believe a priest.

He protested abuses in the Church, then got carried away with his own take on what were abuses (hmmm, sounds familiar…).

Since I am not a student of history, I don’t recall if he ever formally broke with the Church, but I believe he did, That break would probably make him a Protestant, at that point…

[quote=DominvsVobiscvm]Luther clearly was not a Protestant.
[/quote]

Martin Luther was clearly a Protestant:

csi-int.ch/csi-art_030310.html

Martin Luther…In 1521, he was quoted in the Reichstag of Worms. There, in the middle of April, he was expected to denounce his theses in front of the entire worldly and spiritual elite of the Reich, including Emperor Charles V. He refused, saying: “…Unless I’m convinced through the Scriptures or clear logical reason, I do not believe the Pope or the council, since it is clear that they have erred and contradicted themselves on numerous occasions. Through the Scriptures, as I have mentioned, I am convicted in my conscience as a prisoner to the word of God. I can therefore not denounce my conscience, since doing something against your conscience can never be safe or beneficial. May God help me. Amen.”

For those of you who don’t get it, this thread is a sarcastic rejoinder to the “Was Saint Athanasius Catholic?” thread.

Of course Luther was Protestant . . . :rolleyes:

[quote=DominvsVobiscvm]For those of you who don’t get it, this thread is a sarcastic rejoinder to the “Was Saint Athanasius Catholic?” thread.

Of course Luther was Protestant . . . :rolleyes:
[/quote]

LOL, I was about to post a serious and lengthy essay until I read your post :o. A good reminder not to take ourselves too seriously on this forum.

Luther was protestant as he decided his conscience trumped the church’s teaching no matter if it were councils, church fathers, popes etc. Luther opinions via sola scriptura and his interpretation of it trumped all others.

But what may confuse some is that he was far more catholic in worship than the typical Lutheran is today which looks more reformed than traditioanlly Lutheran. It is true many of the older Luterhan churches look catholic. In fact you can’t tell the differnce even marian statues and shrines. Lutheran churches used to have confessional to but they have in recent years stripped them out.
Today very few Lutherans have marina devotions or confess to their pastor as Luther did. Some Lutherna churches celebrate communion once a month! Luther had a high view of this sacrament and wouldn’t go a sunday withou celebrating this. It would outrage him to skip 3 Sundays! So in a way you could say modrn Lutherna churches have lost their external catholicity . But unless your communion with the Bishop of Rome no matter how much you look catholic your not catholic.

[quote=DominvsVobiscvm]For those of you who don’t get it, this thread is a sarcastic rejoinder to the “Was Saint Athanasius Catholic?” thread.

Of course Luther was Protestant . . . :rolleyes:
[/quote]

:rotfl:

I did a lot of digging for my answer…thanks! :rolleyes: :o

Luther was not only a Protestant but he was the measure by what initially made one Protestant.

Today the title Protestant means little more that those the follow the beliefs founded on the principles of the reformation – Sola Scriptura, Sola Fida, and the universal priesthood of all believers.

Now what I mean by the statement that Luther was the measure of that which was ‘Protestant’ is that the original meaning of the word applied to the Princes and cities that ‘protested’ against the decision of the second Diet of Speyer (1529) to enforce the Edict of Worms (1521) to deny toleration to Lutherans.

Shibboleth:

See post #6.

Yes I saw the post but I think few people understand the entomology and the contemporary meaning of the title ‘Protestant.’ Interestingly enough my own fellow Lutherans seem to be the worst. Even though the thread was a bit of a joke I thought I would add the little bit of knowledge that I knew on the subject.

As far as the other thread I saw the title but did not read any of the posts. From all that I have read the Catholic Church has been very clear on who was and was not a Catholic during the Arian Heresy.

I like this definitnion of Lutheranism:

We are not Roman Catholic; and because of this we are catholic.

We are not Eastern Orthodox; and so we are orthodox.

We are not at all Evangelical in so much as we are evangelical.

…And we are not Reformed so much as we are reforming.

and when asked…

“Do you think that yours is the true religion?” we say:

“Yes, but we are not the only ones who have got it.”

[quote=DominvsVobiscvm]Martin Luther believed that Mary was sinless, and that she was Assumed into Heaven. He also believed she was ever-virgin. He also believed that articifical contraception was sinful, as was masturbation.

He also believed that many books of the New Testament (James, Hebrews, Revelation, and others) were uninspired.

Luther clearly was not a Protestant. Nor was he a Catholic.

Luther was simply a Christian, and did not belong to any denomination that exists today.
[/quote]

YES But he did try to rejoin the Catholic Church later in life.

[quote=dhgray]YES But he did try to rejoin the Catholic Church later in life.
[/quote]

No he did not try to rejoin the Catholic Church. Luther’s death was recorded by the eye-witnesses Justus Jonas and Michael Coelius, the court preacher in Mansfield. At his death, the Protestants at the time that were with him by his death bed called for an artist. The artist sketched Luther’s face because it was widely believed in both Catholic and Lutheran circles that if someone had a painful or horrified look on their face at death it was a sign that they were suffering in hell.

Luther did express dismay at every fool in the book grabbing hold of Sola Scriptura and believing that they were the Pope. Luther did not mean such things when he spoke of Sola Scriptura – but that is another thread and has been spoken of to the point that there is little else to say.

Luther’s last words written on a piece of paper are from February 16 and were: "Virgil’s shepherd poems cannot be understood, except by one who has been a shepherd for five years. Virgil’s poetry about agriculture cannot be understood, except by one who has been a farmhand for five years. Cicero’s letters cannot be understood, except by one who has participated and lived within a large community for 25 years. The Holy Scriptures do not have a satisfactory taste for me or anyone else, unless he has spent 100 years ruling a community as the prophets Elijah and Elisha, John the Baptist, Christ and the Apostles.

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