We are Sacrament?

I am needing some information regarding the use of the term “sacrament.” Our dre states that “We are Sacrament.” When my eldest was in class for confirmation prep, she showed the kids slides of a sunset, trees, people kissing, etc. All were “sacraments.” She also showed a slide of someone shooting up, and a soldier in the process of killing. She said that while these were bad things to do, the people were still “sacrament,” as they were made by God. She told me that this is new terminology in the Church, and I may have trouble understanding it. Where does this come from? I have searched the Catechism, tons of other books, the Bible, and can’t figure this out. Help!
Thanks and God Bless,
Stacy Kay

This was taken from AmericanCatholic.org

To read the whole link click on: americancatholic.org/Newsletters/CU/ac0893.asp

An important step in enriching our understanding of sacrament is to see Jesus himself, in his humanity, as the first and original sacrament. It all starts with Jesus. Jesus himself is our sacrament, our visible sign of the invisible God.

From Jesus to Church

[left]“But we cannot see Jesus. Jesus is no longer among us….” It didn’t take Christians long to see how false that objection is! St. Paul was born again in the light of the revelation that Christ is present among us. Paul retells the incident: "I fell to the ground and heard a voice saying to me, ‘Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting me?’ I replied, ‘Who are you, sir?’ And he said to me, ‘I am Jesus the Nazorean whom you are persecuting’ " (Acts 22:7-8).

Paul realized that Christ cannot be separated from his members. The risen Christ is so identified with the Christian that what Paul did to a Christian, Paul did to Christ himself. The Christian is baptized into Christ and can say with Paul, “yet I live, no longer I, but Christ lives in me…” (Galatians 2:20).

As Jesus is the original sacrament, so we who are baptized into the risen Christ become sacrament. Today it is Christ’s body the Church which is the sacrament, the revelation of the loving plan of God. The Second Vatican Council teaches that Jesus “rising from the dead, sent his life-giving Spirit upon his disciples and through this Spirit has established his body, the Church, as the universal sacrament of salvation” (The Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, #48).

The Church itself is sacrament. Another point in enriching our understanding of sacrament is to think of sacraments not so much as something we receive but something that we are. We are sacrament, instruments of grace; we are the ordinary way God graces today’s world.

[/left]

Please ask her to prove these assertions by providing references of magisterial weight.

Is this what they mean by the New Age movement invading the Church ?

1131 The sacraments are efficacious signs of grace, instituted by Christ and entrusted to the Church, by which divine life is dispensed to us. The visible rites by which the sacraments are celebrated signify and make present the graces proper to each sacrament. They bear fruit in those who receive them with the required dispositions.

[quote=stbruno]This was taken from AmericanCatholic.org

To read the whole link click on: americancatholic.org/Newsletters/CU/ac0893.asp
[/quote]

ite Review for
American Catholic Online
AmericanCatholic.org RATINGS **Fidelity: ** DANGER! || Resources: Fair || Useability: Excellent First Evaluated: 10/03/01 Last Updated: 05/23/05 DESCRIPTION AmericanCatholic.org, home of the online editions of St. Anthony Messenger, Catholic Update, Millennium Monthly, Youth Update, Scripture From Scratch and other Catholic features, is a service of St. Anthony Messenger Press and Franciscan Communications, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A.While one can find good material on this attractive site, it must be carefully sifted. St. Anthony Messenger magazine has through the years consistently undermined the authentic teachings of the Church. This website is a continuation of that process.

catholicculture.org/sites/site_view.cfm?recnum=163

I can understand the reference from the American Catholic site, but is this official Church, magisterial, teaching? What would you say about the inanimate, inhuman items referred to in this way (sunset, etc?) I am also unsure if I should let my 14yods into these classes. He is less discerning than my eldest.
Thank you kindly,
Stacy Kay

It seems the message taught here is “it’s all about US”. The message that *should *be taught is “it’s all about GOD”. I would stay far away from this self-righteous New Age heresy.

I’m tired of this Flower Child Catechesis- bring back the Truth! (and no, you don’t find it by doing peyote or transcendental meditation)

Stacy Kay,

This is an invention. I heard a priest preach it from the pulpit once. You are not going to find it anywhere because it has never been taught by the Magisterium.

We are Sacrament, We are Church, We are Woman…laughs (as in horror movie) We are Gods!

steer clear of this Heresy.
This is the ultimate end of this New Age Mumbo jumbo

[quote=fix]Please ask her to prove these assertions by providing references of magisterial weight.
[/quote]

I think knowing that we, as Paul says, constitute the Mystical Body of Christ. As such we are even more a sacrament than other signs of God’s presence in the world. New age thinking would say that all these signs were not signs, but in reality God because for the new agers who are generally panthiests all are one and all are God. So this is not New Age claptrap. Where I see the problem coming in is that no differentiation seems to be made between the idea of sacrament, small s, and Sacrament of which there are only seven, outward signs,instituted by Christ, to give grace. Certainly there are other signs that point to God and His presence in the world, but even in toto they do not equal the Seven. I think the lady has a little learning and it sounds as though she hasn’t enough to keep from being dangerous to herself and others. I have noticed this even in some trained DRE’s They fall so in love with some concept, often half understand it, and feel they have to lay it on the whole World. Well meaning, but stone ignorant!

[quote=QUICUMQUE VULT]We are Sacrament, We are Church, We are Woman…laughs (as in horror movie) We are Gods!
[/quote]

AAAAAAAAAAuuuuuuuuuugggggggggghhhhhhhhhh

:bigyikes: :bigyikes: :bigyikes: :bigyikes: :bigyikes:

This directly relates to what I was asking about in my Neo-paganism/Wicca thread!

Now I’m depressed. :crying:

Bishop Fulton Sheen wrote a book about sacraments and he prefaced it with these words:
"Our Lord had a divine sense of humor, because He revealed that the
universe was sacramental. A sacrament, in a very broad sense of the
term, combines two elements: one visible, the other invisible–one that
can be seen, or tasted, or touched, or heard; the other unseen to the
eyes of the flesh. There is, however, some kind of relation or
significance between the two. A spoken word is a kind of sacrament,
because there is something material or audible about it; there is also
something spiritual about it, namely, its meaning. A horse can hear a
funny story just as well as a man. It is conceivable that the horse may
hear the words better than the man and at the end of the story the man
may laugh, but the horse will never give a horse laugh. The reason is
that the horse gets only the material side of the “sacrament,” namely,
the sound; but the man gets the invisible or the spiritual side,
namely, the meaning.

A handshake is a kind of sacrament, because there is something seen and
felt, namely, the clasping of hands; but there is something mysterious
and unseen, namely, the communication of friendship. A kiss is a kind
of sacrament: the physical side of it is present if one kisses one’s
own hand, but the spiritual side of it is missing because there is no
sign of affection for another. One of the reasons why a stolen kiss is
often resented is that it is not sacramental; it has the carnal side
without a spiritual side; that is, the willingness to exchange a mark
of esteem or affection.

(continued from Bishop Sheen)

This book on the sacraments is written because men live in a world that
has become entirely too serious. Gold is gold, nuclear warfare is
nuclear warfare, dust is dust, money is money. No significance or
meaning is seen in the things that make a sound to the ear, or a sight
to the eye. In a world without a divine sense of humor, architecture
loses decoration and people lose courtesy in their relationships with
one another.

When civilization was permeated with a happier philosophy, when things
were seen as signs of outward expression of the unseen, architecture
was enhanced with a thousand decorations: a pelican feeding her young
from her own veins symbolized the sacrifice of Christ; the gargoyle
peering from behind a pillar in a cathedral reminded us that
temptations are to be found even in the most holy places. Our Lord, on
the occasion of His planned entrance into Jerusalem, said that if men
withheld their praise of Him, “the very stones would cry out,” which
they did as, later, they burst into Gothic Cathedrals.

Now the stones are silent, for modern man no longer believes in another
world; they have no story to tell, no meaning to convey, no truth to
illustrate. When faith in the spiritual is lost, architecture has
nothing to symbolize; similarly when men lose the conviction of the
immortal soul, there is a decline in the respect for the human. Man
without a soul is a thing; something to be used, not something to be
reverenced. He becomes “functional” like a building, or a monkey
wrench, or a wheel. The courtesies, the amenities, the urbanities, the
gentility that one mortal ought to have for another are neglected once
man is no longer seen as bearing within himself the Divine Image.
Courtesy is not a condescension of a superior to an inferior, or a
patronizing interest in another’s affairs; it is the homage of the
heart to the sacredness of human worth. Courtesy is born of holiness,
as ornamentation is born of the sense of the holy. Let us see if
ornamentation returns to architecture, if courtesy also returns to
human manners; for by one and the same stroke, men will have lost their
dull seriousness, and will begin to live in a sacramental universe with
a divine sense of humor.

Life is a vertical dimension expressed in the soaring spire, or in the
leaping fountain, both of which suggest that earth, history, and nature
must be left behind to seek union with the Eternal. Opposite to this is
an error which substitutes the horizontal for the vertical, the
prostrate form of death for the upright stature of life. It is the
disease of secularity and of naturalism. It insists on the ultimacy of
the seen and the temporal, and the meaninglessness of the spiritual and
the invisible.

Two errors can mar our understanding of the natural world: one is to
cut off entirely from Almighty God; the other is to confound it
substantially with Him. In the first instance, we have the clock
without the clock maker, the painting without the artist, the verse
without the poet. In the second instance, we have the forger and the
forged rolled into one, the melting and the fusing of the murderer and
the victim, the boiling of the cook and his dinner. Atheism cuts off
creation from its Creator; pantheism identifies nature with God. The
true notion is that the material universe is a sign or an indication of
what God is. We look at the purity of the snowflake and we see
something of the goodness of God. The world is full of poetry: it is
sin which turns it into prose."

[quote=fix]catholicculture.org/sites/site_view.cfm?recnum=163
[/quote]

The article in question has an Imprimatur from Archdiocese of Cincinnati, and was written by one of the Church’s leading authorities on the Sacraments, Fr. Tom Richstatter. You can email him at asktom@tomrichstatter.org.

CatholicCulture.org is a fringe website that purports to evaluate the true Magisterium of the Catholic Church according to their own private criteria. They will even tell you which Bishops and Archbishops are heretics.

[quote=Catholic2003]The article in question has an Imprimatur from Archdiocese of Cincinnati, and was written by one of the Church’s leading authorities on the Sacraments, Fr. Tom Richstatter. You can email him at asktom@tomrichstatter.org.

CatholicCulture.org is a fringe website that purports to evaluate the true Magisterium of the Catholic Church according to their own private criteria. They will even tell you which Bishops and Archbishops are heretics.
[/quote]

You are too funny. I have much greater faith in the orthodoxy of the folks at catholic culture than Fr. Richsatter. The Imprimatur today is not sufficient in each case to mean all is well with the publication.

In this culture war, he who controls the language controls the thought. Any description of the Church and its practice which starts off with “we” and drops the article to describe the direct object is a sign of a new “agey” type agenda. For example, We are Eucharist. :confused: What exactly does that mean? We receive the Eucharist, but we are Eucharist. We are sacrament rather than we receive the sacrament. And if we have to “celebrate,” then we’re really in trouble, “we celebrate Eucharist.” :banghead: I’ve even heard “Eucharist as a verb.” I don’t know what the past tense would be, but I’ve read and been told to approach the Eucharist as a verb. Words are loaded and changing the words like that changes the meaning and changes our point of reference, hence, our theology regarding the subject. Notice how such a shift in language puts us at the center of the universe. We are not the Sacraments: Instead they are given to us by our Creator.

there are 7 sacraments, all administered by the clergy. i think to think anything else is ( to be charitable, i am trying) not, edging (sneaking up) on blasphemy.
let’s see if i can get this right. baptism, first communion, confirmation, marriage, holy orders, and annointing of the sick. i could be wrong due to old age (impending alzheimers)

you forgot confession:tsktsk:

:smiley:

[quote=fix]I have much greater faith in the orthodoxy of the folks at catholic culture than Fr. Richsatter.
[/quote]

I can only pray that other Catholics aren’t as easily fooled by CatholicCulture.org as you seem to be.

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