Wearing workout clothes to weekday mass?


#1

I’m just curious of others’ opinions on this matter. I am going for a run after work today and then I am going to Confession. There is a Mass right after Confession that I would like to stay for but I will be in workout clothing and will not have time to go home and change. How terrible would it be to attend Mass in workout clothing? My family and I dress for Sunday Mass (when I say dress I mean no jeans and the boys wear shirts with collars) so I am having trouble with this. Any thoughts?


#2

I personally don’t think it’s a big deal to be dressed casually at a weekday mass. I split my time between a traditional parish (ICKSP) and an Ordinary parish, and at both I’ve seen people wearing sweatpants (at weekday mass, I’ll see those same people on sundays dressed up).

One thing I would say is that on the occasion when I’ve gone to a weekday Mass at night, people have been more dressed up.

In short, it depends on the parish, but I wouldn’t be too worried about it.

-AJ


#3

If you want to stay for Mass, stay for Mass and don’t worry about what you are wearing.

Daily Mass is often a refuge for people who work, so you will see people in all manners of dress. I am of the opinion that it is your “presence” that matters, not how you look.

Peace be with you. :slight_smile:


#4

Catechism regarding clothing etc and reception of Holy Communion:

1387 To prepare for worthy reception of this sacrament, the faithful should observe the fast required in their Church. Bodily demeanor (gestures, clothing) ought to convey the respect, solemnity, and joy of this moment when Christ becomes our guest.

scborromeo.org/ccc/p2s2c1a3.htm#1387

Make a good judgment.

There is likely a spectrum of what such clothing would be…

Is there not a bathroom there -to change?

(when I went to University during when it was hot enough for shorts --I carried some clothes with me to change for daily Mass)


#5

If you were unable to go to Sunday morning mass or the parish didn’t do an evening mass, would you be forgiven if you went to the weekday mass, every single week instead as it fitted around your life better?


#6

Catechism regarding clothing etc and reception of Holy Communion:

1387 To prepare for worthy reception of this sacrament, the faithful should observe the fast required in their Church. Bodily demeanor (gestures, clothing) ought to convey the respect, solemnity, and joy of this moment when Christ becomes our guest.

scborromeo.org/ccc/p2s2c1a3.htm#1387

Make a good judgment (I would tend to say simply – bring a change with you…)

There is likely a spectrum of what such clothing would be…

Is there not a bathroom there -to change?

(when I went to University during when it was hot enough for shorts --I carried some clothes with me to change for daily Mass)


#7

I wouldn’t worry about it. I had a guy in front of me at a Sunday Mass wearing a Tee Shirt that said Beer. It’s not just for breakfast anymore and a pair of shorts with flip flops.

It doesn’t matter anymore. The days of people actually caring how they dress for Mass are just about dead except in FSSP areas.

The important thing is to be comfortable and above all be and express yourself. :thumbsup: If I had a dollar for everytime I’ve heard the phrase " God doesn’t care what I wear He sees me naked every day", I would probably be a millionaire.


#8

It’s a weekday Mass. Come as you are. I used to end my workouts by attending Mass.
Some workmen will attend Mass in work clothes, either on their way to work or on their way home from work.
Prayer is the lifting of our hearts and minds to God. Our outer clothing is less important than our inner disposition.


#9

My personal opinion is that I’d prefer that people come in workout clothes and sweats than shorts. Covered skin is always better, I think.

If you feel odd about it, ask the priest. Surely he will put your mind at ease, and his is the only opinion I would even care about. :wink:


#10

God has seen you naked so dont worry about wearing your work clothes. Being there is the most important thing!


#11

Thanks to all for the replies. I will go make my confession and then ask Father his thoughts on Mass in yoga pants, tennis shoes and a windbreaker :blush:


#12

Weekday (even everyday) does not substitute for Sunday Mass (the Lords Day…or evening prior).

Now can there be legit reasons when one is not able to go? Yes. It can happen -like one is sick …but such should not be “the norm”.


#13

I’d suggest something that covers your derrière, that is if the windbreaker isn’t long enough. Maybe running shorts over the tights/yoga pants?


#14

It’s come as you are. I see no problem with this.


#15

If you are female you shouldn’t wear pants of any type to church unless your church allows that. I was born and raised Roman Catholic and the women are not allowed to wear pants to Mass and we have to have our heads covered. Not sure if this is the case at your church. I would wear the proper clothes just out of respect. :slight_smile:


#16

Um, there may be a “rule” where you attend, but there is no rule for the Roman Catholic Church as a whole.

I wear pants all of the time to Church. And I don’t cover my head.


#17

I am sorry, what? :confused:


#18

Just use your best judgment. You are an adult, you got this!! :thumbsup:


#19

This is not a Church rule. It is perfectly permissible to wear pants to Mass, even on Sundays. Wearing a head covering is a discipline, not a requirement. No more scrambling through purses to find a handkerchief just to have something on the head before entering a church. The OP asked about clothing during the week. During the week, come as you are. Stop. Spend time with the Lord as you go about your daily activities.
Sundays are different. On Sundays, we do need to take more time dressing for the occasion. Of course, modesty always.


#20

I wouldn’t worry about the clothes too much, but if you’re going to run, then sit through Mass, then into into a small, enclosed space…I might worry more about the priest and his nose…:smiley:


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