Wearing your hoodie in public could soon cost you up to a $500 fine


#1

KFOR:

Wearing your hoodie in public could soon cost you up to a $500 fine

OKLAHOMA CITY,Okla.-The cold Oklahoma weather has many sporting hoodies outside to help fight the cold, but wearing a hood in a public place could soon be against the law. The idea of banning hoods is not new to Oklahoma, right now, there is a law banning hoods during crimes that’s been around since the 20’s.
It was originally drafted to help combat crimes from the Klu-Klux-Klan, but people we spoke with say a new amendment of banning hoodies in public could open doors to a bigger problem.
They’re a common closet find, the hoodie.

“I’ve been wearing hoodies since I was a little kid,” Eduar Carreon, a hoodie user said.
Even Kevin Durant is a hoodie fan.
“If somebody is out running, especially in this kind of weather, where it`s cold, drizzly, you might be inclined to wear your hoodie at Lake Hefner,” attorney James Siderias said.
“21 OS 1301 has always made it a crime to wear a hoodie or some sort of disguise during the commission of criminal offense,” Siderias says.
Now, a proposal for an amendment to that law, could make it illegal to hide your identity in public. The fine for your fashion crime? $500.
“I think this is a violation of an individual’s right to chose what they want to wear as long as it doesn’t violate the realm of public decency and moral values, and I think this could be very problematic,” Siderias said.
Senator Don Barrington authored the proposed amendment; he says they want to help victims of robberies.

“The intent of Senate Bill 13 is to make businesses and public places safer by ensuring that people cannot conceal their identities for the purpose of crime or harassment….Similar language has been in Oklahoma statutes for decades and numerous other states have similar laws in place. Oklahoma businesses want state leaders to be responsive to their safety concerns, and this is one way we can provide protection.” – said Sen. Don Barrington of Lawton.

Kind of going overboard, no?


#2

This would be an oppressive law. Hoodies are a useful form of clothing for the North American climate.


#3

Not to mention, what’s next?

If the goal is to make sure facial features are unobscured, will the next step be to ban sunglasses?

This is a classic instance of an overweening government.

ICXC NIKA


#4

This guy (Coach Bill Belichick) could be in BIG trouble if this “law” ever gets passed and spreads to a national scale!:rotfl:


#5

That’s just stupid! Hoodie does not equal criminal. The only time I actually wear my hood is if it is raining. My hair goes cray when it gets wet. Anyway, it doesn’t cover my face. A hoodie isn’t like a mask, like the KKK hoods. This is just ridiculous.


#6

A clearly anti-Catholic law if I ever saw one! Just look at these faithful Catholics during Holy Week in Spain!


#7

If not for the reasons stated perhaps they should be made illegal for their lack of style. :stuck_out_tongue:


#8

Here in Seattle I always see kids wearing ski masks, balaclavas, bandanas done up cowboy outlaw-style, those funny hoodies with all-inclusive face masks that are kind of a cross between a Halloween costume and shopping mall skater swag, etcetera. Not to even mention that approximately 90% of the city’s populace owns and wears hooded rain jackets. Yeah, I don’t think that law would work here.


#9

We are all good, as long as we can still waddle around with our pants below our butts…:rolleyes:


#10

I think they are trying to address wearing hoodies (with the hoods up) indoors. Can’t think of many good reasons to wear them in a mall or a drug store.:shrug:


#11

From the original link:

“21 OS 1301 has always made it a crime to wear a hoodie or some sort of disguise during the commission of criminal offense,” Siderias says.

Now, a proposal for an amendment to that law, could make it illegal to hide your identity in public. The fine for your fashion crime? $500.

The law isn’t about “hoodies,” it is about hiding your identity.

Is it cold outside? Wear a hat, pull up your hood.

Sunny out? Put on some sunglasses, wear a baseball cap.

Walking into a bank or store? Put that hood down, take the hat off of your head and put the sunglasses in your pocket.

It isn’t hard and it isn’t discrimination.


#12

Off the topic here but on my computer this thread is taking up the whole screen (sides are off or gone), why and how do i make it stop?


#13

True. It’s just common courtesy to not terrify bank tellers and whatnot.


#14

But it is yet another example of where law-abiding people need to alter their behavior because of the misdeeds of law-breakers. And I’m sick of this - especially because, by definition, lawbreakers will continue to do what they do (including obscuring their appearance during things like bank robberies, muggings, etc.), and only the law-abiding will be inconvenienced. So yet again, the rules of public behavior are being set for and by the barbarians amongst us. No way to run a society. Got to stop.


#15

How does the saying go? Good cases make for bad law.

I have been in stores where a man had a bandana pulled up over his nose in bandit style though he was not robbing the store, it made me wonder what was up.

So, I can see how there are considerations, still, it seems like bad law because too many people wear hoodies, it is functional clothing.


#16

And the bank can have dress rules. I have been in banks that say please remove your sunglasses and hats before getting in line.

Sort of like no shirt, no shoes, no service.


#17

True enough, but there’s a difference between what a bank may request for its own security, and police stopping you, arresting you, and fining you for what you’re wearing on a public street, particularly when the “offense” is in the nature of the garment and not for any “offensive” language that may be printed on it.


#18

It wouldn’t be an offense to simply wear hoodie.

Again, according to the link:

“The intent of Senate Bill 13 is to make businesses and public places safer by ensuring that people cannot conceal their identities for the purpose of crime or harassment….


#19

I agree with you. I don’t think this needs to be a state law. Beyond certain general rules about minimum levels of coverage I think the states should stay out of fashion decisions.

What is next? Banning Nehru jackets, polyester, sandals with socks, shoes without socks?


#20

How do the police know you’re wearing a hoodie to commit a crime? Do they have some sort of pre-cog like in Minority Report? If they are suspicious, and you’re wearing a hoodie, they can fine you. What is “Suspicious” is completely at the officer’s discretion.

It’s a stupid nanny-state law that persecutes law-abiding citizens “for safety”.


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