Wedding at Cana, Jesus' first miracle...


#1

During the Wedding feast in Cana, Jesus performed his first miracle, the making of water into wine. John 2:1-11. There is something that really puzzles me about this. We read in the Bible that it is OK to drink in moderation. However, we know Jesus said, “fill the water jars with water and fill them to the brim”. Lots of planning goes into a Wedding and John 2:9 tells us there was a “Director of the Feast” that must have been involved in the planning.

Therefore, when the wine ran out, perhaps the attendees consumed more then anticipated. Now the miracle was performed and it built faith among his Disciples. However, it makes we wonder if Jesus was really all that much against certain human pleasures in life including enjoying spirits a little beyond the normal limit.

But today, if someone is served too much alcohol at a festivity, usually the host is responsible to make sure everybody drives home safely and could also be legally responsible for their safe return after the party. So, let 's say these jugs were now filled to the brim and someone with a low tolerance level has let’s just say two more glasses of wine after it ran out beyond their limit.

These people had to get to the Wedding somehow, maybe on a Donkey. Further lets assume that this man with low tolerance rides home with his 16 year daughter on the back of the Donkey and because of the extra wine goes down a steep hill and his daughter falls off and is critically injured. If this happened then Jesus could have even been sued in todays standards for providing the miracle which in term made the wine available.

Now the miracle could have been Mary saying, look the flowers have all wilted and we have no flowers. Then Jesus could have said look women, bring me a flower and then turned all the surrounding hills and pastures into flowers everywhere galore and amazed the crowd with nature versus alcohol and accomplished the same thing. I am not really convinced that Jesus was all against a little bit of drinking even somewhat over the normal limit with this miracle where he made more, but do agree scripture says not to over indulge in alcohol. However, the wine was a sign of things to come and it representated the taking of Jesus’ blood. This was similar to how Jesus mutiplied the bread, which was symbolic of the taking of the Body of Christ. Have a great day, love tommy


#2

the typical wedding in that time and place was celebrated over several days, with guests coming from other villages accommodated in the neighbors’ homes, so everybody would have a chance to sleep it off before travelling home. Just because He made an abundance of wine does not necessarily mean all of it was consumed during the festivities either.


#3

[quote=tommy1234]…the wine was a sign of things to come and it representated the taking of Jesus’ blood. This was similar to how Jesus mutiplied the bread, which was symbolic of the taking of the Body of Christ. Have a great day, love tommy
[/quote]

Which of course is the real point of this whole silly post: to attack the Real Presence of Jesus in the Most Blessed Sacrament.

Some people are so transparent, especially when their post history reveals an anti-Catholic bias. :rolleyes:


#4

Tommy,

Dorothy Sayers’ play cycle on the life of Christ, Man Born to be King, she uses as a theatrical device (to make it more “reasonable” for the wedding to have run out of wine) that while Jesus was expected at the wedding, His disciples weren’t but just showed up with him. Having half a dozen extra guests (I think the wedding was before all the disciples had been called) might indeed put a crimp in the supply of wine even without people drinking to excess.

I would like to emphasize that this is only one possible interpretation and is not at all required by the Catholic Church. I’m not even sure that Ms. Sayers was Catholic. So it doesn’t invalidate your point but merely gives a possible alternative scenario.

  • Liberian

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