Wedding processions

Is it true in Catholic weddings that the bride and groom used to process down the isle together. I heard that protestants are the ones that started giving the bride to the groom at the alter. Does anyone know if this is true or anything about that? Thanks

Sincerely,

Teles J. Sanchez

[quote=Teles]Is it true in Catholic weddings that the bride and groom used to process down the isle together. I heard that protestants are the ones that started giving the bride to the groom at the alter. Does anyone know if this is true or anything about that? Thanks

Sincerely,

Teles J. Sanchez
[/quote]

Yes, I believe that it is Catholic tradition that the bride and groom process together.

The bride does not need to be given away. The bride and groom are the ones receiving the Sacrament of Marriage, not the father of the bride.

If I ever get married, I will not have anybody give me away. Of course, my father can attend the ceremony if he wants to!:slight_smile:

[quote=GoLatin]Yes, I believe that it is Catholic tradition that the bride and groom process together.

The bride does not need to be given away. The bride and groom are the ones receiving the Sacrament of Marriage, not the father of the bride.

If I ever get married, I will not have anybody give me away. Of course, my father can attend the ceremony if he wants to!:slight_smile:
[/quote]

The entire “giving someone away” is actually not in the Rite of Marriage, but is entirely a secular custom. Thus, there are no "Catholic’ traditions on the subject, only regional or ethnic practices.

I have seen several variations, bride alone (meeting groom at altar), bride with groom, bride with father.

According to the liturgical book, which I believe applies in the United States of America:

ENTRANCE RITE
19. At the appointed time, the priest, vested for Mass, goes with the ministers to the door of the church or, if more suitable, to the altar. There he meets the bride and bridegroom in a friendly manner, showing that the Church shares their joy.
Where it is desirable that the rite of welcome be omitted, the celebration of marriage begins at once with the Mass.
20. If there is a procession to the altar, the minsters go first, followed by the priest, and then the bride and the bridegroom. According to local custom, they may escorted by at least their parents and two witnesses. Meanwhile, the entrance song is sung.

From The Rites Volume One, Liturgical Press, 1990, ISBN 0-8146-6015-0, page 725.
So it does not have separate procession for the bride.
Adaptations can be made to this and "Decisions on this matter are to be reviewed by the Apostolic See, (Rite of Marriage, n. 12). This edition has adaptations for the United States, such as the solemn blessing. But as far as I know, there is no adaptation to the entrance procession.
I remember in an Australian liturgical book for the Rite of Marriage it had something like: there can be a traditional bridal procession.

forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=97650

Malia

The question, “who gives this woman to this man?” is not in the Catholic rite. Obviously, she gives herself. Also, “I now pronounce you man and wife,” and “by the power invested in me etc” are Protestant.

[quote=G&S]The question, “who gives this woman to this man?” is not in the Catholic rite. Obviously, she gives herself. Also, “I now pronounce you man and wife,” and “by the power invested in me etc” are Protestant.
[/quote]

Also, “if anyone knows why these two should not be joined, etc”

However, this is taken care of by printing wedding banns in the parish bulletin or making a public announcement for three weeks or at least a suitable period of time prior, in effect asking the congregation to notify the church immediately if there are any impediments why these two cannot be married. When a marriage is being convalidated aka blessed by the church, the wedding banns are usually omitted.

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