Weekly Fast days

What are ther different weekly fast days observed in the different Eastern Catholic Sui Juris Churches? I’m speaking of normal fast days in ‘ordinary time’ not Lent or other times.

Weds. and Fri. are traditional fast days in the Byzantine tradition.

Wednesdays, Fridays
plus fasting periods and Eve of Theophany, Beheading of St John the Baptist, and Elevation of the Cross, adds up to 196 fasting days in the year. I just loaded up on a great sale on tofu. :thumbsup:

Wednesdays, Fridays
plus fasting periods and Eve of Theophany, Beheading of St John the Baptist, and Elevation of the Cross, adds up to 196 fasting days in the year. I just loaded up on a great sale on tofu. :thumbsup:
(This past Wed & Friday were fast free, a fast free week.)

How strict is the weekly fast? Is it nothing until sundown? Any restrictions on what can be eaten?

Abstaining from certain foods is generally more accurate. This site has what seems to be a good generic description of fasting for the East, tho it’s an Orthodox site. These are the guidelines and fasting is considered something* to be done with the guidance of one’s spiritual father*.

There are good interviews about Fasting in the Byzantine Church Year with Fr. Moses of Holy Resurrection Monastery, and Feasting in the Byzantine Church Year also with Fr. Moses. Click on the “… (more info)” to see all the questions Catherine Alexander asks Father. Meat, eggs and dairy, and fish are typically abstained. The calendars for the year we get at church, like you get in your Latin Church, have fast days color coded and sometimes have annotations such as “Wine & Oil”. There are lots of articles on line about the fasting tradition in the East. Here’s one example.

For Eucharist fasting is for “morning Liturgies, an absolute fast (no food or drink, even water) on arising from sleep until receiving Communion. Some also abstain from meat and dairy after the preceding Vespers. For afternoon or evening Liturgies, one should keep an absolute fast for at least six hours.”

**Good question.

Some monasteries keep such a fast until mid-afternoon.

Others will extend the fast until after Pre-Sanctified Liturgy in the Evening during Lent.

Traditionally interpreted, the Byzantine fast (along with abstinence from meat, milk, eggs, fish, olive oil, and wine) allows ONE meal in the afternoon, of just vegetables cooked in water.

Very few people are this austere.**

Thank you all for the information and links. Wonderful!
On a side note, is there a lenten greeting used prior to Pascha?

Slava Isusu Krystu! (“[FONT=Arial]Glory to Jesus Christ!”)
Slava na viky (“Glory forever”)
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Not one specific to Lent, no.

“Christ is risen!/Truly He is risen!” is universal.

From Nativity through 31 December, “Christ is born!/Glorify Him!”, originally a Ruthenian and Ukrainian practice, has spread through English-speaking Orthodox and Byzantine Catholics generally.

Greeting for Theophany: Christ is Baptized/In the Jordan
I’ve also heard: Christ is Baptized in the Jordan/by John

Right now I generally hear: Glory to Jesus Christ!/Glory forever! or Christ is among us/ Now and forever (or Now and shall be)

During the Christmas season, Serbs greet each with:

MIR BOZE! HRISTOS SE RODI!
VO ISTINUS E RODI!

GOD’S PEACE! CHRIST IS BORN!
INDEED HE IS BORN!

Do you know the Church Slavonic transliteration of and Christ is among us/ Now and forever! ?

Christos posryedye nas : i yest i boudyet.

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