Welcoming Anglicans into the Roman Catholic Church

I am so excited to see so many Episcopalians saying yes to God’s call to join in fellowship with Rome.

uscatholic.org/news/2011/10/washington-cardinal-confirms-members-former-episcopal-community

As a former Anglican, I am excited that other Anglicans see the true faith in Roman Catholicism. I will be excited to see the Anglican Ordinariates formulating in the coming future.

:thumbsup:

Wonderful news! Up until now most of the events have been in England, so it is good to see one in America where, ironically, the first requests to join the Church originated and resulted in Anglicanorum Coetibus.

It appears that in accepting these Anglicans, those who were not originally confirmed as Roman Catholics were confirmed again, is that correct?

I think the Baptism and Matrimony are the only previous sacraments whic will be accepted as valid.

You are correct. Confirmed Anglicans will need to be confirmed into the Catholic faith. The Roman Catholic Church does not recognize Anglican Priests or Bishops having valid orders. So Anglicans must be confirmed in the RCC where the valid orders exist. Once the Anglican Priests and Bishops are recieved into the Catholic Church, they will have valid orders.

OK, that’s the same thing Orthodox do.

Yes, The Orthodox Church only recognizes their orders as valid, so anybody who comes into the Orthodox Church will get confirmed.

Not always! I know many RC converts to Orthodoxy who were received by profession of faith.

I was offered this option myself. It was the decision of Archbishop Job to receive me by Profession of Faith and communion.

However I asked to be Chrismated with the others … and so it was :slight_smile:

I guess I’m not that much excited to hear those who inter alia either ordained women to priesthood or served side-by-side with them are now teaching and preaching within the Catholic Church.

That said, I happen to be email friends with a female Anglican priestess whose theology I obviously disagree with but whom in the ecumenical spirit, I will stay in touch with.

It seems to be those who disagreed with actions like ordaining women who are entering under the Ordinariate. Do you know of specific cases of “those who inter alia either ordained women to priesthood or served side-by-side with them are now teaching within the Catholic Church?”

I don’t know if he ever served side-by-side with women priests but isn’t one of them currently a bishop of the SSPX and the biggest obstacle in their reconciliation attempts? That’s one too many for me.

Timeo danaos et dona ferentes

and that’s all I’m going to say on this thread.

So one man, who didn’t even enter the Church under Anglicanorum Coetibus, means that we shouldn’t accept Anglicans into the Church? You must not think we should allow any converts.

Obviously, Episcopalians in the United States who are disenfranchized with the Episcopal Church (rightfully so) are the ones who are coming to Rome. In my opinion, these men should be applauded for coming to Rome. These priests, bishops, and laymen will face some ridicule from the Protestant world for making that move. They could have realigned themselves with the ACC (Anglican Catholic Church of America), or ACNA (Anglican Church of North America), or REC (Reformed Episcopal Church). The fact that they are choosing Rome is a clear sign of their following the Holy Spirit’s guidance and that the Spirit is interested in unifying God’s church under the Roman Pontiff. No distrust should be cast on Anglican priests coming under Rome, as these priests need to be approved before being ordained anyways. It is not like this is a Catholic Priesthood Drive-Thru for Married Clergy. This is a big deal, and is being treated as such. Already some of the priests who have come in are praising the RCC for its truth. Also, many of them are very high church Anglicans which means they will turn out to be really good Catholic Priests. :slight_smile:

Would like to see some details on that. I can’t quite imagine SSPX and women priests. :confused:

Quite the paradox :juggle:

One must not imagine that interest in the Ordinariate is coming exclusive from the Anglo-Catholic branch of the Episcopal Church/Anglican Communion.

I am a “broad church” Anglican, and I simply see no viable alternative to joining the ordinariate. As a general principle, less schism is better than more schism, and joining any of these groups would entail joining an even smaller denomination that the increasingly microscopic Episcopal Church (funny now that a biologist is now the Presiding Bishop).

I am Catholic in faith and morals, and though less inclined toward certain Catholic practices, I am a believer in transubstantiation and and observer of Sunday obligation.

As to becoming a Catholic, I still have some hurdles to jump, but it is reasonable to expect that I will jump these in the fullness of time. I expect my conscience to drag me, kicking and screaming into the embrace of Holy Mother Church.

With all due respect for your situation, it is the exception, rather than the rule. Nearly all of the former Anglicans who have come over/are in the process of coming over in the wake of Anglicanorum Coetibus would fit the description of Anglo-Catholic. The rites that they use demonstrate as much. The group of Anglican bishops that requested a provision in 2007 that ultimately resulted in Anglicanorum Coetibus are from the Traditional Anglican Communion, and are predominately Anglo-Catholic.

I think it will be up to the Ordinaries to assure a welcome for more broad-church Anglicans like me. My beliefs are really quite in line with the Catholic Church. And I intend to be quite a pest to help them remember.

I quite agree with Chatter.

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