Were/are these sports sinful?


#1

Formula 1 and other divisions in 1980 and before: Formula 1 was in 1980s and before even more dangerous than NASCAR. A lot of people died. Was participating or watching this sport where several people drove in circles for the top award even to the deah a sin?

Professional boxing: The sport that bother’s me the most. I myself train amateur boxing and until some time ago, i was a big fan of professional boxing. I think its a noble, honourable and friendly sport with sometimes catastrophic consuquences. People die in the ring alot of times or get heavily injured. But these deaths and heavy injuries are mostly the result of the stubrness of boxers, who would fight even if they know that their life is on the line. Professional boxing would be alot safer if there would be a governing body to know when it is safe for a boxer to fight or not.


#2

You can die in most sports. In football or rugby, someone could get hit hard enough to die, or their heart can give out on the field/pitch. A cheerleader can fall or be dropped and die.

Heck, walking down a flight of stairs can cause death if you trip and fall. That doesn’t mean that we should stop walking down stairs.


#3

I imagine one may find various opinions on such – here is a Quote from a Professional Moral Theologian:

**“Moralists generally have doubted the morality of professional boxing, of the bull-fighting popular in Hispanic culture, of speed racing, and of various kinds of stunting in which there is serious risk of death or grave bodily injury.”

~ Fr. Benedict Ashley OP
**

From the work “Living the Truth in Love, a Biblical introduction to Moral Theology” 1996 pg 306 (Alba House).

(Fr. Benedict Ashley was professor of Theology at the Aquinas Institute of Theology, highly respected author of several text and countless articles on moral theology. A consultant for the Committee on Doctrine of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and a senior fellow of the Pope John Center of Medical Ethics. He was honored with the Pro Ecclesia medal from Bl. Pope John Paul II)

(Note Bene the term “professional” regarding boxing there. I imagine moral theologians can discuss any difference between “professional boxing” and other kinds of boxing…but I note this for there are likely various distinctions that can be made theologically)


#4

Formula One and NASCAR racing has had some benifits to the automobile industry. They have been helpful in the manufacturing of safer and more reliable passanger vehicles.
Boxing however; I have always felt was an unnecessary “sport”
Pax et Bonum:bible1:


#5

True but although most of us don’t need to practice risky sports, going up and down flights of stairs is pretty much a necessary component to every day life. So is eating and we can contract food poisoning. Those risks are unavoidable.

Boxing, rugby or jumping out of perfectly serviceable aircraft (the pilot in me speaking…) on the other hand are voluntary risks.

So the question remains a good one to ask.


#6

It is just a sport. :shrug:


#7

Sports are not sinful.


#8

Of course, if at first you don’t succeed, perhaps sky-diving is not for you!:smiley:


#9

As the lady says "Help! I’ve fallen and can’t get up!!


#10

People in biblical times used to frequent arenas to watch men fight against lions and other beasts, the crowds loved to see people die and fight to the death, I believe the Romans had the Gladiators and they were quite popular, even with families and women,

Then, in turn of the century, it was common for families to pack picnics and go out to watch battlefields during the revolution, the public showed up in droves to watch men die, and for the action, and it was a considered a picnic!!

it is really no different than why people go to nascar races, they dont go to watch cars go around in a circle 200 times, that is quite boring, they go in hopes of seeing an accident or two, Im pretty sure this is common knowledge, I recall my parents speaking about this as well as teachers and other adults at school and friends parents, they were all saying the same thing, so it makes sense, and historically we all know the crowds love to see blood, whether its in biblical times or dangerous sports of modern times, does not matter.

IDK if its considered sinful though…I cant recall if Jesus ever spoke out against the Roman Gladiators or the sport in general…?


#11

I do think it is sinful that Super Bowl Sunday is a bigger “holiday” so it seems, than Christmas or Thanksgiving! (An assistant manager of a grocery store told me this once and was referring to amount of sales for Super Bowl as opposed to some actual holidays.)


#12

Really? I watch the Super Bowl, but I think I definitely spend more money for Thanksgiving and Christmas. Even if I threw a Super Bowl Party, it wouldn’t add up to the amount that I spend for Christmas.


#13

I worked at the above mentioned grocery as a bagger and the days leading up to Super Bowl Sunday quite often looked like preparations for some serious parties.


#14

Yes, true. But if you engage in a particularly risky sport, and for example you are sole provider for a family, putting exposure to risk ahead of your family does not, IMHO, strike me as wise.

So it’s not a question with a black-and-white answer. One has to consider the context.

I am a pilot, and have my own aircraft. Before my wife and I were married, we often flew together. After we had kids, she refused to fly with me on the grounds that if something happened, she didn’t want to orphan the kids, and she wouldn’t let me take all our kids (3 sons) up at the same time. In retrospect, I think it was a very wise decision. Although we do often drive in the same car together, and many pilots like to joke that the trip to the airport is the most dangerous part of flying :stuck_out_tongue:

(actually that’s not true but I digress)

This is actually an area of prudential judgement where one has to weigh risk and one’s responsibilities.

Hah! Any landing you can walk away from is a good one, and if you can get to use the aircraft again afterwards, it was a great one :smiley:

In skydiving, that means necessarily any good landing landing is usually also a great one :stuck_out_tongue:


#15

How is that a sin?


#16

It’s football rather than honoring the birth of Jesus ( in the case of Christmas) I guess since so many spend Thanksgiving Day watching football ,we should let that one go!:shrug: You could be thankful if your favorite team wins.:smiley:

Peace, love and turkeys!:thumbsup:


#17

“Moralists generally have doubted the morality of professional boxing, of the bull-fighting popular in Hispanic culture, of speed racing, and of various kinds of stunting in which there is serious risk of death or grave bodily injury.”

~ Fr. Benedict Ashley OP

From the work “Living the Truth in Love, a Biblical introduction to Moral Theology” 1996 pg 306 (Alba House).

(Fr. Benedict Ashley was professor of Theology at the Aquinas Institute of Theology, highly respected author of several text and countless articles on moral theology. A consultant for the Committee on Doctrine of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and a senior fellow of the Pope John Center of Medical Ethics. He was honored with the Pro Ecclesia medal from Bl. Pope John Paul II)


#18

Some people play professional sports to provide for their family. My husband and I both have high risk jobs. I’m a teacher, they get shot at work all the time. He is in the military. It isn’t sinful that we keep our jobs when we have children. It isn’t sinful to play a sport. I think it is a bit silly that y’all will travel in a car, but won’t fly together. To each their own, still isn’t sinful.


#19

There can be reasonable “high risk jobs” and unreasonable…see the quote above.


#20

There can be reasonable “high risk jobs” and unreasonable

which is why moral theologians take a look at such…see the quote above forums.catholic.com/showpost.php?p=11434061&postcount=17


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.