Were there ever women priests?


#1

Hi:
I hope someone can help me with this:
I was just told that at one time (possibly in the U.S.) there were women who were ordained (whether as priests or as deacons I am unclear as of yet) because of a shortage of priests, but once the shortage ended, these women were told their services were no longer needed and they were thus “unordained”. Is this true? Is there even a smattering of truth in this?
Thanks in advance for your help.


#2

First of all, women do not have the ability to have priestly grace. Jesus chose men. Even if a women were to be “ordained”. She could never ever have vaild sacraments.


#3

[quote=Laura B]Hi:
I hope someone can help me with this:
I was just told that at one time (possibly in the U.S.) there were women who were ordained (whether as priests or as deacons I am unclear as of yet) because of a shortage of priests, but once the shortage ended, these women were told their services were no longer needed and they were thus “unordained”. Is this true? Is there even a smattering of truth in this?
Thanks in advance for your help.
[/quote]

I think not.

John Paul II in Ordinatio Sacredotalis said:

I declare that the Church has no authority whatsoever to confer priestly ordination on women and that this judgment is to be definitively held by all the Church’s faithful.

The Church does not have the authority to do such a thing. I would assume that since they do not have that authority, they have never done it.


#4

The Church infallibly defined all this already, drop the subject! Okay that was harsh your probably just trying to learn more. My apologies.

But a woman cannot be ordained as a doughnut cannot be consecrated into the Body of Christ. Its just invalid matter.


#5

twizted:

Actually, you are right, I was just seeking information to clarify what I had heard. I had been unable to verify what I had heard by any other means and thought I’d try here. By no means am I trying to argue for the ordination of women.
I am not at liberty at this time to state who told me this but I do have my reasons for trying to verify or refute this, so any help I can get would indeed be greatly appreciated.


#6

In Communist Czechoslovakia, shortly after the War, a bishop determined that it was needful to “ordain” women “priests” to serve in women’s prisons. An unauthorized synod was held, and “ordinations” were carried out without Vatican assent.

You will find this referenced on pro-women’s-ordination web pages as if it were a precedent for ordaining women today. I was unable to re-locate a web link to anything other than the pro-women’s-ordination sites, although I know there is one.

Needless to say, those claimed ordinations were illicit and invalid.


#7

Unfortunately, my own mother holds tenaciously to the idea that only patriarchal power greed stands in the way of priestesses.

She has found an archeologist who has studied a lot of early christian art and believes that it demonstrates that the early church had women priests. (Naturally, their literature nearly ignores the likelyhood that such art was produced by heretical groups) Not even this crowd claims there has been any such thing in modern times.


#8

There may at some point in the Church have been women who were called deaconess, but the term, and the office, referred not to an ordained clerical state, but to a ministry of service. (For example, they may have been used to assist at Baptisms in the times when baptisms were done by immersion with catechumens not wearing clothes.)


#9

[quote=manualman]Unfortunately, my own mother holds tenaciously to the idea that only patriarchal power greed stands in the way of priestesses.

She has found an archeologist who has studied a lot of early christian art and believes that it demonstrates that the early church had women priests. (Naturally, their literature nearly ignores the likelyhood that such art was produced by heretical groups) Not even this crowd claims there has been any such thing in modern times.
[/quote]

I’m no expert on this but the only “archaeological” argument anybody ever tried on me was analyzing an image of the blessed Virgin in priestly vestments. Vestments? The mosaic was late 4th or early 5th Century and the “vestment” was a cloak. It didn’t sell me.


#10

[quote=Laura B]Hi:
I hope someone can help me with this:
I was just told that at one time (possibly in the U.S.) there were women who were ordained (whether as priests or as deacons I am unclear as of yet) because of a shortage of priests, but once the shortage ended, these women were told their services were no longer needed and they were thus “unordained”. Is this true? Is there even a smattering of truth in this?
Thanks in advance for your help.
[/quote]

It is not your responsibility to “disprove” this assertion. Rather, it is the responsibility of the person who told you this to provide documentation.
His or her inabity to do so will invalidate the statement. If “documentation” is provided, it can then be examined for its veracity.
JPII in O.S., above, pretty much buried the bones of this old horse, but it would be interesting to see what this person comes up with.


#11

[quote=Laura B]Hi:
I hope someone can help me with this:
I was just told that at one time (possibly in the U.S.) there were women who were ordained (whether as priests or as deacons I am unclear as of yet) because of a shortage of priests, but once the shortage ended, these women were told their services were no longer needed and they were thus “unordained”. Is this true? Is there even a smattering of truth in this?
Thanks in advance for your help.
[/quote]

Laura,

If I may ask, who told you this? There are all sorts of outright lies being spread about the Catholic Church, many by people who should know better. This sounds like complete hooey.

  • Liberian

#12

Thanks everyone for your help, please do keep it coming.

At this moment, I have no other details about this supposed fact I was told and I cannot say who told it to me at this point. I hope to be able to explain it later but suffice it to say I have my reasons for all of this. Thank you so very much.
God bless.


#13

BTW, in my previous posts, I forgot to ask for prayers for the situation that brought me to even ask about this. Please pray that I may have courage, charity, perseverance, patience and any other virtue I may need in this instance: I need all the help I can get.

I do hope to explain better later.
Thanks and again, God bless.


#14

[quote=Laura B]Hi:
I hope someone can help me with this:
I was just told that at one time (possibly in the U.S.) there were women who were ordained (whether as priests or as deacons I am unclear as of yet) because of a shortage of priests, but once the shortage ended, these women were told their services were no longer needed and they were thus “unordained”. Is this true? Is there even a smattering of truth in this?
Thanks in advance for your help.
[/quote]

Might you be thinking of the women who were ordained by Bishop Felix M. Davidek ?

More details here: womenpriests.org/called/davidek.asp ##


#15

[quote=mercygate]I’m no expert on this but the only “archaeological” argument anybody ever tried on me was analyzing an image of the blessed Virgin in priestly vestments. Vestments? The mosaic was late 4th or early 5th Century and the “vestment” was a cloak. It didn’t sell me.
[/quote]

I looked it up for ya.

The archeologist’s name is Dorothy Irvin. She is a member of St. Joan of Arc parish in St. Paul, MN if that gives you any hints about anything… I’ve seen the calendar and read the captions. I find them to be a bit forced; trying to find evidence for the conclusion you already hold and stretching supposition to its limits to get there.


#16

[quote=manualman]I looked it up for ya.

The archeologist’s name is Dorothy Irvin. She is a member of St. Joan of Arc parish in St. Paul, MN if that gives you any hints about anything… I’ve seen the calendar and read the captions. I find them to be a bit forced; trying to find evidence for the conclusion you already hold and stretching supposition to its limits to get there.
[/quote]

Thanks. :rolleyes: Unbelievable.


#17

Thanks again to all, especially to Mercygate and Gottle of Geer, this was indeed the incident I was told about.

Sorry for being vague earlier. Now I can explain somewhat: I work (gasp!) for a secular newspaper. I was assigned to do a profile of this religious sister, who happened to be for the ordination of women and had told others about the Czech incident. Not having heard about this case before, I wanted to get some facts before I spoke with her. I also want to be as fair and objective as possible. (Honest, reporters do try to do so. And there are still reporters who are practicing, believing, even traditional Catholics (admittedly they (we?) are in the minority)). Please pray for us all and for me and this article.


#18

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