What are some religious orders that combine contemplative and active lifestyles?


#1

I want to join a religious order that combines both contemplative and active lifestyles. I already know that the Dominicans and the Passionists do this.


#2

My first recommendation would be the Society of Jesus, or Jesuit. I there is a new order that follows Ignatian spirituality called Miles Christi (Soldier of Christ). I have been helped by this order for the past three years. You can check them out at www.mileschristi.org.

God bless you!


#3

[quote="Samuel63, post:2, topic:287352"]
My first recommendation would be the Society of Jesus, or Jesuit. I there is a new order that follows Ignatian spirituality called Miles Christi (Soldier of Christ). I have been helped by this order for the past three years. You can check them out at www.mileschristi.org.

God bless you!

[/quote]

I was going to say the same thing about the Jesuits!

Haven't heard of Miles Christi. :thumbsup:


#4

The Order of Friars Minor give their member a great deal of freedom to live out their vocation as they most feel called. Capuchins also.


#5

I may be wrong but I don’t think so but the monastic order is a mix of contemplative prayer and an active lifestyle. As monks like to say pray and work. Pray of course is a part of their every day, they say all the hours together, and I think they do lectio devine in some way together, and if not it is strongly encouraged that all do lectio. Then they work, bake bread, build caskets, make soap, teach classes, and many many other things. Just a suggestion. One last thing try to learn more about who you, and what prayer life fits you. If you enjoy nature and praying in God’s creation be a fransican and stay away from monastic life. If you enjoy praying and diving into scripture, and you could spend hours and hours a day just reading scripture, then the monastic order may be for you. what liturgies you enjoy could be a part of this as well. When discerning a call to religious life know what your spirituality is as a person, it will help your discernment.


#6

The Fraternity of Jerusalem is a newer order but I know they are semi monastic meaning all of their members work part time in the community as well as live the monastic life. I have included the link below. I have included the English version of their website. The community's main language is French but don't let language turn you off. In Quebec, there are lots of language courses that you can take. If God is calling you to them, he will help with the language issue. Their community is wonderful and their music is heavenly. They have a community in Montreal in a very beautiful church. It is so gorgeous. I've also included their youtube video. If you have any questions, message me.

jerusalem-montreal.org/bienvenueEng.html

youtube.com/watch?v=itMhCD1ys54

youtube.com/watch?v=B9FlGTEU7OM&feature=channel&list=UL


#7

There are variety of choices, depending on whether you primarily wanted to be an active religious in ministry or a contemplative who also had a ministry. Even in contemplative religious orders, people have jobs to do!

I'll second the Franciscans and Dominicans. Also, some Benedictines and Carmelites have schools, parishes, and other ministries. Jesuits tend to the active/ministry side of the equation, although some are involved in retreat ministry and spiritual direction and enjoy something more akin to the balance that you are seeking.

I recommend that you find a good spiritual director to help you as you discern.


#8

Carmelites are active contemplatives.

You can check out my provinces vocations website here: Order of Carmel


#9

Benedictines. Prayer and Work is their motto.


#10

May be Cistercians (OCist).:shrug:
God bless you all!


#11

From my experience in religious life active means that a man is active within the Church and moves within it.

A monastic, by definition, is not active. He stays within his monastery and the people come to him.

An active religious goes out to the people.


#12

makes sense mea culpa


#13

[quote="ByzCath, post:11, topic:287352"]

An active religious goes out to the people.

[/quote]

what are some active religious groups or orders then?


#14

[quote="Living_Stats, post:13, topic:287352"]
what are some active religious groups or orders then?

[/quote]

Anything that is not monastic or hermetic. The various mendicant orders, the Jesuits, any of the Societies or Congregations. Basically anything where a priest moves about the Church at large.

The mendicants mix some of the monastic life with the active life.

As I stated, we Carmelites like to say that we are active contempletives. We pray in community but we also set aside time where we pray privately within our cells. This is within our rule. We also serve the Church where we are needed. We work in parishes, schools, retreat centers, doing spiritual direction, and much more.


#15

[quote="ByzCath, post:14, topic:287352"]
Anything that is not monastic or hermetic. The various mendicant orders, the Jesuits, any of the Societies or Congregations. Basically anything where a priest moves about the Church at large.

The mendicants mix some of the monastic life with the active life.

[/quote]

So would Franciscans or Dominicans count?


#16

[quote="Living_Stats, post:15, topic:287352"]
So would Franciscans or Dominicans count?

[/quote]

Yes definitely. I mean, the Franciscans travel around wherever they are needed, caring for the poor/ sick. And the Dominicans travel around wherever they are needed, preaching the Gospel. And doing everything else that they do. So, I'd say they're very active.


#17

Definitely the Norbertines, or any other Canons, like the Canons of New Jerusalem. They take a vow of stability and have communal prayer, but they also do active work.


#18

Here is a list of religious orders of men and women with links to more information. God bless!

carmelitani.wordpress.com/list-of-religious-orders/


#19

They are both mendicant orders.


#20

I can't believe the Passionists haven't been mentioned yet; one of the objectives of the founder was to combine the contemplative spirituality of the Trappists with the missionary zeal of the Jesuits.

Of course the many replies here illustrate how such vast themes as 'contemplative' and 'active' vocation can be combined in a number of ways. But I do believe the Passionist vocation is one of the more deliberate combinations of the two, and it has borne impressive fruits for the Church.


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