What Are You Thinking?


#1

I am interested to know what some of you out there think of religious life. Do you know something about it? Do you have questions or opinions related to this particular life? are you open to the possibility that God may be calling you to become a Priest, Sister or Brother? Are you willing to share your dreams and hopes for your self and your future?
What are you thinking?:slight_smile:


#2

Hi there. :slight_smile: I’m Sarah, and I am 17 years old and a junior in high school.

Right now…I’m not really sure where I’m being called. But I am open to any possibility God may throw at me. My aunt is a nun down in Clyde, Missouri with the Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration (actually, she’s the vocation director right now…check out my signature. :wink: ). So I’ve had experience and contact with at least one type of religious order. And I love those nuns down there…they are so fun and full of life! :slight_smile:

So far, I’m dreaming of finding out myself. I’d just really like to know where I’m going, but I know that some people don’t discover their vocation right away, and that it takes awhile. Whatever will happen, will happen. I just need to trust God that He will lead me to wherever I need to go. And sometimes that’s the hardest part.


#3

Seventeen is a wonderful age to enjoy life and friends! Just be and live it to the fullest, loving God and neighbor.:slight_smile:


#4

Hi again, Sister Helena! I just replied in your “Friends of Carmel” thread. :smiley:

I had a possible vocation to religious life, in my 20’s (I was very interested in the Carmelite Order). But my vocation wasn’t encouraged by my Catholic parent. Sadly, I wasn’t courageous enough to strike out on my own.

I have often wondered… “Did I ignore an invitation from the Lord?” :frowning: I have asked Him, a few times. And haven’t really been sure of His reply to that particular question. I do know this, however. If I had entered religious life… or married and had a family… I probably wouldn’t have been available to care for my mother, when she became ill. She was dx’d with Alzheimer’s a couple years ago… and is now in my care. (Perhaps, that IS Our Lord’s reply?); I love my mom, dearly. She is such a blessing from God.

Having said all of this. I’m probably now too old, to consider a later religious vocation. I know that most women’s communities do not accept older women (I just turned 50 :rolleyes: ). But the Lord and I have discussed it… and I hope, at some point later, to become a Lay Carmelite. This may be a “2nd” invitation from Our Lord. Only time will tell, I guess.

His will be done.

I peeked at your Profile… and saw that you work with the elderly. Aren’t they wonderful? They are so close to God; and so full of humor and wisdom.

God bless!


#5

I’m 18 and thinking about the religious life. I’m leaning towards the Franciscans right now, but Carmalites are wonderful, too!

ps- Have you looked in at the vocation forum, Sr. Helena? There are quite a few young discerners over there!


#6

It’s a pleasure to meet you! I had just replied to your posts in the other threads.

We will never know what could have been. But we believe in what St. Paul wrote in his letter to the Romans 8:28-“To those who love God, everything turns out for the good.” A call is an invitation, a pure gift. One is free to accept or reject without negative repercussions. The God you want to serve in religious life is the same God who gave you your mother to care for. In a way, you answered in the way that was right for you at that moment.
Being a Lay Carmelite is not second best. It is a true vocation to union with God while remaining in the world. :slight_smile:


#7

Thank you, Sister. Your words have helped me… greatly. God bless you.


#8

Dear Sister

You are a nun are you. I would love the monastic life but it cannot be. I would not pass the health exam. I’m happy where I am though. That’s where God wants me.

God bless and peace to you:)


#9

Pleasure to meet you, John. I hope to have you as a regular poster!


#10

Dear Sister

Thank you. Nice to meet you too.

God bless you:)


#11

If you are pretty sure that God is calling you to religious life, and if all signs point to the certainty that you are called, would you say “YES?” Despite all the fears and anxieties which accompany vocational discernment, are you willing to risk it all for God?


#12

Dear Sister Helena,

You sound so sweet it is a joy to read your posts.
I am 57, single, and have travelled the world all my life.
I have no reason to doubt that your convent is the best one in the world.
However, if I was allowed (which I am not ) to explain to you my experiences with priests , nuns and monks around the world I am sure you would understand that the last thing I need in my life is to be part of any religious community.
I am sorry to say this, but it is the truth.
Love to you


#13

Thank you for your honesty. I’m sure you have very good reason to justify your negative feelings and assessment of religious life. It is truly a serious challenge God has given to us Religious to live up to this noble calling. It is very sad indeed when our imperfections and sins stain this beautiful gift from God.

I believe in the sacredness and beauty of this vocation. It is the life of Jesus himself. There is no excuse for the behavior of some Religious who place stumbling blocks in others way. But like the Church itself, Religious communities are made up of sinners who strive to redeem themselves by God’s grace. I hope your experience has not harden your heart. The consecrated life is a tremendous gift God has given to his Church. Just like our baptismal commitment, if it is lived in truth and fullness, it is life in God.

Thanks for sharing.


#14

Sister, your words bring to mind certain passages in the autobiography of St. Therese of Lisieux… “The Story of a Soul”. St. Therese herself, struggled greatly during her religious life with some of the traits and personalities of her sisters in the cloister. Through trial and perseverence, she managed to overcome her own difficulties with others, and make great strides in holiness.

From reading “The Story of a Soul”… I had determined that religious life is anything but easy. Was I correct in my understanding of St. Thereses’ words? It caused me to wonder if ever… anyone goes into religious life… with unrealistic expectations? But… I suppose that is why they spend time as postulants and novices? To discern?


#15

Religious life is a difficult life. The difficulties specific to it is the fact that people of different personalities, educational background, spirituality and level of maturity, chose to live together to answer a call. You choose who you marry, you can quit a job if you don’t like it, or remain in the world as a single person with your own plans and endeavors. But not in religious life. But it is a CHOSEN life. One chooses to be a religious. Everybody is here with the same goal- to follow God and grow in holiness- but the problem however lies in the fact that everybody sees holiness in different ways, relates to God in different ways and lives the Gospel invitation in different ways.
Everybody who entered religious life had some kind of unrealistic expectations in varying degrees. Just like marriage, you grow into the relationship with God and your Sisters. If one is faithful to prayer, God gives you the understanding and purifies your vision. One continually grows in religious life, not just during postulancy and novitiate. Formation is a lifelong process. The fruit of a good discernment is to be able to accept the fact that one enters the convent or monastery in order to be tried in virtue. If this is not one’s goal, there will be plenty of opportunities in the world for holiness and ministry.


#16

:thumbsup: Nice post.

I’m also thinking of religious life. I’d say Yes to the possibility and would willingly risk everything for God. :slight_smile:


#17

I’m going to be 18 in a couple weeks. I want to be a Religious Studies professor, in hopes of teaching a… uh… secular class. :o I hear of classes, like Bible Studies, for example, in which they either praise the Bible or attempt to tear it apart to prove it wrong. :rolleyes: I’d like to look and teach it as a literary work, thank you very much. :wink:

(Of course, I’d want to be an English teacher and/or writer before all this. :slight_smile: )

So, yeah, I don’t know about leading a “religious life,” considering I’m Agnostic, but I would very much like to learn more about as many religions as possible. Right now, I’ve begun my independent studies on the Occult. It’s gonna be a long year. :stuck_out_tongue:

Ironically Yours, Blade and Blood


#18

Dear Sister Helena,
I am very glad that you have started this thread. I am 50 years old and have always felt the calling to be a nun. I married and had 3 children and my husband has passed away. The desire has again become very strong over the last few years but I’m getting too old with few options. It is so difficult to know what I should do!! I would love a cloistered life but that is pretty unrealistic when I have 3 children. The yearning in my heart never goes away though. It is confusing and hard and I don’t know what God wants from me.
God bless you Sister and your calling!!!


#19

Dear “LoverofChrist”. Are you aware of the new Order which has been founded by Rosalind Moss ? The Order will be accepting women of any age… provided they are able to follow the Rule of the Order. Check the link below… for more info. God bless.

forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=218721


#20

If you have three questions to ask someone in Religious life, what would they be?:smiley:


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