What are your favourite songs


#124

My fifth favorite song is…If Not For You by Bob Dylan


#125

Here is the finale from a violin concerto by Baroque composer Carlo Tessarini.


#126

One of those Bob Dylan ear worm songs, by the (probably very stoned) Manfred Mann.


When Quinn the Eskimo gets here, everybody gonna jump for joy…

#127

Don’t worry, be happy!


#128

#129

#6…Into the Mystic by Van Morrison


#130

The ‘Christmas’ concerto by seventeenth- century composer Arcangelo Corelli.


#131

Too many to name:)
All of me by John Legend,Halo by Beyoncé,I don’t usually like Justin Timberlake but I love his song Mirrors,Elton John,David Bowie,Elvis,a whole bunch of Slavic songs,and I like Bachata music too…


#132

There’s probably a connection, my friend. But where are today’s cantors with the technique of a Jan Peerce? There was a golden-age era of cantors, which you may be familiar with (Hershman, Rosenblatt, Sirota, Kwartin, etc.), but hardly any today of similar quality.


#133

I think the Legendary Susan Boyle deserves a mention too.


#134

Was he the most prolific composer?


#135

Where are the singers out there like this in general? The technique stills exists though not the old school depression era discipline.


#136

Sad, but true.


#137

I like the eclecticism!

For me, anything by the (early) Simon and Garfunkel. Or Joni Mitchell.


#138

Do you mean Corelli? If so, hardly. His total oeuvre comes to less than a hundred works. I think the most prolific is probably Telemann, who has well over fifteen hundred surviving works to his credit.


#139

Yes, I meant Telemann, who I remember learning way back was the most prolific. I suppose no modern composer will surpass his output, in quantity at least.

Dumb question, I know, but who is your favorite composer excluding the moderns? You seem to be a baroque person.


#140

On the contrary, quite a good question, particularly as I cannot narrow it down to just one! By the way, it is interesting that different people define ‘modern’ differently. For Carl Orff, for example, modern music begins with the rise of polyphony in the twelfth century!

You are right that I am primarily a Baroque guy, but I have my favorites in later eras, too: Beethoven, Mozart, Schubert, Mendelssohn (love that Sommernachtstraum overture!), Brahms, Mahler, Alban Berg and Aaron Copland. But to your question: I can give you three favorites of mine: Claudio Monteverdi, Georg Friedrich Händel and Jean-Philippe Rameau. Here is a favorite piece from each gentleman:

The Rameau menuet, in particular, has affected me deeply over the years. I discovered it when I was a boy, and I used to play it over and over, weeping all the while at its beauty.


#141

Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you got till it’s gone?


#142

Same here! :slight_smile:


#143

The overture to Shakespeare’s A Midsummer-Night’s Dream by Mendelssohn.


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