What are your views on feminism?


#1

Personally I don’t agree with a lot of feminists for the most part but I do agree with certain things such as there should be no GST on tampons (it’s a need not a want) and that there should be equal pay for equal work done.


#2

I guess I’m a feminist according to the textbook definition. I support egalitarianism but I don’t align myself with feminists when it come to certain issues like abortion, gender theory etc.

There are different kinds of feminism today (eg those who are against sex work vs those who are for it, pro life/choice) but we tend to view them all as one collective group which can cause a lot of confusion tbh.

I agree with equal pay for equal work. As for the tampon/pad thing, sure it sounds great for us but I’m not educated enough on that matter to defend/oppose it.


#3

I agree with same job, same salary.
I agree with, we should be able to walk around freely without fear of being molested.
I agree with equality in work within a home, chores should be shared equally.
I agree with parenting being shared equally.

I do not agree with positive discrimination. Let the best man/woman do the job.
I do not agree with abortion.

Lower taxes on hygienic supplies? I will leave this for the administration to decide.


#4

depends on what wave of feminism we’re talking about


#5

The blanket term “feminism” can cover many things.

I’m in favor of equal pay, equal work opportunities, equal educational opportunities, generous maternity leave, daycare availability, and women being able to walk around without being harassed or harmed.

I’m not in favor of abortion or forcing employers to pay for your contraception.

Most women who go around defining themselves as “feminists”, I find annoying to be around because they see everything through a gender lens and make a big deal about men vs. women all the time.


#6

I guess how it’s perceived today.


#7

I think there is still a place for feminism as women still face biology based discrimination. Doesn’t mean feminists are always going to agree on everything.


#8

When “feminists” are okay with professional women who are pro-careers for women but strongly anti-abortion, I might get interested in them again.

In USA I remember a controversy because a woman carrying an anti-abortion sign was not allowed to be part of the Women’s March after Trump was inaugurated. That is extremely annoying. It’s not much of a “women’s movement” when women with unpopular views are suppressed. It’s excluding women and disempowering them because abortion is considered the be all, end all of women’s rights. No thanks to that - I don’t want women holding me back any more than I wanted men doing it.


#9

First and second wave feminism, sure. You want the right to vote? You should have it! You want to be able to work for your own income without barrier or discrimination? You should have the right to work as well! Hey, the economy is better off if twice the workforce previously available can now contribute to it (although there is the question of personal happiness and fulfillment, on average (how many cans of angry worms am I opening here?)). And when the economy’s better, generally, everyone’s better.

But you want abortion on demand without question? Guaranteed equal outcome instead of equal opportunity? (<-Third wave) Constantly talking about sex and private matters and denigrating men, not because of the first amendment, but to “smash the patriarchy,”? (<- Fourth wave, and there’s probably more components yet to be seen) Well, now you’ve lost me.


#10

I think it has a lot of valuable insights, some of which are still pretty important today. I also think it’s gone badly wrong in some cases, such as abortion. I think part of the problem is that sometimes it copied some of the worse parts of western masculinity (for an example, I think untying men’s worth from their career would be better than spreading that nonsense to women).

I think people’s experiences are going to shape their views. I think both sides of the alley have a tendency to divide into camps and talk like anything that sounds like the other camp is evil. I think it’s good for us to think about sexuality and consent beyond just “no sex outside of marriage”, for example. (For a personal example there, I got a lot on what you could and couldn’t do outside of marriage, but not really any idea that even if something was ok to do I could say no and any man worth my time would accept that.)


#11

I am not a feminist. I believe in equal dignity of men and women and both men and women should be treated equally with respect and fairness but I think the feminist movement has gone way beyond those issues into ideas that have hurt families and are very sinful.


#12

I remember there was a great feminist conference that went to Africa. The African women wanted to talk about things like “I want to be allowed to drive”, “I want to go out in public without a male relative”, “I don’t want genital mutilation.”

The Western feminists who had come wanted to talk about things like birth control and abortion.

It’s important to agree on your definitions before you talk about stuff, because otherwise, everyone has their own idea of what is meant by a certain label, and you end up talking past each other.

And sometimes, people count on that. :stuck_out_tongue:


#13

Equality for all, period, end of story. That includes the unborn!!


#14

??? Are you also against tax on food? Clothing? Those are needs, not wants. What about a tax on medication?


#15

I think feminism is a movement that has outlived its usefulness to women and now has to resort to manufacturing issues to justify its continued existence.


#16

That’s actually how it works in a lot of places. Food in the grocery store isn’t taxed, only pre-made food, and there are tax-free weekends where you can buy clothing without paying tax. Prescription medication is very rarely taxed as well. The logic being that people should be able to get the necessities without paying tax.


#17

The trouble with categories is we’re always going to have to use somewhat inexact categories just because it’s not realistic to describe every position individually. No group is homogeneous and we’d never get anywhere if everyone had to lay every single position out individually.

I’d say if you asked me, I don’t think equal pay and voting rights and whatnot are that controversial anymore, so I don’t think so much about them. I think we still have a lot of parts of the culture where women speaking out and standing up for themselves is still seen as unladylike, or where women are expected to take on a lot more of the burden of being “nice” and accommodating in a way that results in unequal burdens. I think there are also still some areas where there’s an attitude of entitlement that a lot of men have towards women, that they’re owed a woman with certain qualities merely for meeting very basic standards.

I also think it’s a trap to fall into to compare everything to the absolute worst. I am grateful that I’m in a country where I’m not expected to have a man with me everywhere, but I’d still like to read a book on the bus without being called rude terms because I didn’t return flirting, or walk without a guy following me because I didn’t give him a “good enough” reason to say no. (And for church folk, if those things do happen I’d like the first question to not be what I was wearing…)


#18

I live in one of the most highly taxed states in the US, we have one tax free clothes weekend each year. Other than that, food has around a 10% tax and prepared food is around 13%


#19

Time to move?


#20

I am a feminist. I define feminism as advocating for women to have the same rights and opportunities available to men.


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