What can a non-Catholic do during communion?


#1

Hi! My mom and I are not Catholic, but we are attending mass each week and will be starting RCIA in September. We know we’re not supposed to take communion until we’re “officially” Catholic. Right now, we sit quietly or sing along with the choir while the congregation receives communion, but is there anything else we can do during this time? I’ve heard mixed opinions on whether or not receiving a blessing is appropriate, so we’ve been hesitant to ask for one. Also, is it appropriate for us to say the post-communion prayer with the congregation when we haven’t received communion?

Thank you! :slight_smile:


#2

The answer is, if you aren’t singing the Communion Hymn, kneel and pray. You are in the presence of the Lord. And, yes, you may participate in saying the post Communion Prayers. There is no rule against it. The only limitation is that only Catholics and Catholic converts may receive the Eucharist.
And, Welcome to your forthcoming Religious Instruction, Not only will you find it intellectually stimulating, you will find it spiritually uplifting!


#3

Hi! I am also unbaptized and share similar problem with you and your mom. God Bless! :slight_smile:

To me, I kneel down on the pew while others are going out for the Holy Communion. I pray and meditate on the Passion of Christ as well as the glorious Resurrection. I meditate on the Communion prayer in the missal which is often taken from Psalms.

I strongly suggest undergoing spiritual communion. Spiritual communion, as its name suggests, is not a physical consumption of the Host; rather, an individual invokes the coming of the Holy Spirit to cleanse his soul and welcomes the entry of the Eucharist if He doesn’t mind. I always tell Jesus to descend to my heart and rejuvenate my spiritual life, guiding my faltering steps in life and combating all kinds of Satanic influence in case of temptations with the grace of His Holy Communion. I always tell Jesus that although I am unworthy of partaking the Precious Gift as others do, I still earnestly wish that I will be in physical unity with His Host as soon as possible, and ask Him bestow upon me the graces of Baptism and Confirmation as soon as possible. I ask for pardon for those who do not genuinely believe Jesus and His mystical Eucharist, including Christians from other denominations and non-believers, and also Catholics who are weak in faith. I ask for pardon for blasphemy of our world. I meditate on the content of Eucharistic Prayer while others receive their Holy Communion. I ask Jesus to grant me the necessary blessings to give glory to God in my secular life after I leave The Holy Mass. I beseech Jesus to dispatch my Angels to receive the Holy Communion in front of the Altar (if they can :stuck_out_tongue: ).

MOST IMPORTANTLY, I THANK GOD AND JESUS for the awesome Sacrament, a Sacrament beyond human reason. ALWAYS SAY THANK YOU. There are many people in the world who desperately want the Eucharist but are under religious oppression.

Or, the most simple way of uniting with Jesus during Holy Communion is to devoutly stare at the Tabernacle or the Host (which is in the priest’s hands). Say nothing, do nothing. Simply humble yourself and invite Lord to come into your heart.

Do not only focus on your worldly needs during Holy Communion. Holy Communion is a time of Jesus, bot a time for you to ask for this or that graces. Let Jesus guide, comfort, defend, protect and strengthen you during this important moment. Let Our Lord’s affection fill you. Put aside all your worries and concentrate on the Miracle which Our Lord established 2000 yeas ago and ordered His Apostles to pass on to you.


#4

Hello and welcome home

You can sit and join in with the singing during Communion or you can kneel and pray. Only the priest should be saying the Post Communion Prayer.


#5

I went up for a blessing. Hands crossed across my chest indicated I would not be taking communion. It was wonderful, that year of blessings.


#6

You are allowed to go up to receive a Blessing from the Priest during communion.

You must place your arms across your chest with hands near shoulders, that informs the Priest that you are not a baptised Catholic and he will give you a blessing.


#7

:thumbsup:


#8

The blessings during Holy Communion are not an official part of the liturgy, and are superfluous because everyone is blessed at the end of Mass. I always tell people in RCIA that during the distribution of the Eucharist, it is a good opportunity for them to stay in the pew to pray. They can adore the Eucharist, make an act of spiritual Communion, pray what is in their hearts, or use the formal prayers in the Missalettes. You will become a better pray-er doing this. And yes, you can also sing, which is prayer.


#9

When I was in RCIA, my instructor gave me this to pray while the confirmed went to receive communion.

My Jesus, I believe that you are present in the most Blessed Sacrament.
I love You above all things and I desire to receive You into my soul.
Since I cannot now receive You sacramentally,
come at least spiritually into my heart.
I embrace You as if You have already come,
and unite myself wholly to You.
Never permit me to be separated from You.
Amen.

St. Alphonsus Liguori


#10

A spiritual communion is the best advice!


#11

[quote="SAVINGRACE, post:6, topic:333588"]
You are allowed to go up to receive a Blessing from the Priest during communion.

You must place your arms across your chest with hands near shoulders, that informs the Priest that you are not a baptised Catholic and he will give you a blessing.

[/quote]

Not necessarily. Check with the priest. It's not a part of the liturgy, and therefore is not allowed everywhere.


#12

If it’s allowed in some churches during the Liturgy then it should be allowed in all. No priest would refuse someone who requested a Blessing.

That would be mean-spirited after all it has nothing to do with receiving a Sacrament.


#13

I kneeled and prayed before I was received into the church.


#14

We should do only what the Church has determined should be done during Mass. The time for Communion is that, only. No one should be in the Communion line (other than small children who cannot stay in the pew) except those receiving Communion.

The Blessing at the end of Mass is for everyone. No one should be in the Communion line for a blessing. This is a liturgical abuse. Unfortunately, too many priests are, apparently, unable to teach people the proper thing to do.

It is not “mean-spirited” for a priest to refuse a blessing in the Communion line. He should have taught the congregation that they should not come for a blessing. In the case that someone who does not know this comes up in the line, he may give the blessing, but later reiterate that the Communion line is not the place for blessings.

If someone really desires an individual blessing, it would be appropriate for that person to approach the priest after Mass and request one. There is a proper time and place for everything.


#15

Cross you hands over your chest and go up for a blessing. At our Parish our priest invites all Catholics that are not in Good standing and Non Catholics to come up during communion to get a blessing. Besides, It keeps the line going!! :stuck_out_tongue:


#16

It’s got nothing to do with being “mean-spirited.” You could also say that since it’s not part of the liturgy, it should not be allowed in any. As you say, it has nothing to do with receiving a Sacrament; and receiving a Sacrament is exactly what the Communion line is for. A blessing is given to everyone present, at the end of Mass.


#17

OP,

Welcome on your journey home to the Catholic Church. Please read the sticky note provided by the moderators at the top of this forum regarding “blessings” at communion time. It gives a thorough explanation as to why it is NOT a good or approved practice to come forward for a blessing at communion time.

I suggest making a spiritual communion while sitting or kneeling in the pew, maybe using the prayer provided by a PP. Praying silently or singing along with the choir is also a wonderful practice at this time.


#18

[quote="SAVINGRACE, post:6, topic:333588"]
You are allowed to go up to receive a Blessing from the Priest during communion.

You must place your arms across your chest with hands near shoulders, that informs the Priest that you are not a baptised Catholic and he will give you a blessing.

[/quote]

Thanks for this information. I did not know of it. God Bless.

:thumbsup:


#19

This subject has been extensively discussed on this forum and official documents posted on it. According to the Vatican** it is not appropriate** for someone to go up for a blessing during distribution of Holy Communion and even more inappropriate for someone to approach an extraordinary minister for such a blessing.

As has been stated and re stated you will receive a blessing in a few minutes anyway.

Receiving Holy Communion is a Sacrament.

I know that many Parishes allow it and many Priests encourage people to do it.

That does not in any way make it appropriate.

I am a Catholic and often do not receive for any number of reasons. On those occasions I make what is called a Spiritual Communion.


#20

The traditional (and most correct) thing to do for someone who cannot receive communion is to pray an Act of Spiritual Communion.

Going up and getting a blessing slows things down and has been reprobated by the Holy See. Not all priests give a blessing and it confuses other priests who are not familiar with the custom.

The Act of Spiritual Communion is an age long tradition that people who are impeded from receiving Communion do. That is the tradition of the faithful.

Here is one:

My Jesus,
I believe that You
are present in the Most Holy Sacrament.
I love You above all things,
and I desire to receive You into my soul.
Since I cannot at this moment
receive You sacramentally,
come at least spiritually into my heart.
I embrace You as if You were already there
and unite myself wholly to You.
Never permit me to be separated from You.
Amen.


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