What Catholic Jobs Are There?


#1

Hello everyone! I’m going to be a high school senior this year and I need to figure out my college and major ASAP. I love writing and my faith, but I just feel like I don’t know any jobs out there for me to do with my faith. Any input would be appreciated.


#2

You need to figure out your college AND your major? College, yes, the sooner you choose that the better for you, but it is not necessary to know what your major is going to be. Many college students don’t declare their major before their sophomore or even junior year of college, so I wouldn’t be too worried about that.

As for suggestions for good Catholic colleges, I would recommend The Newman Guide to Choosing a Catholic College. Other than that, my three personal recommendations of good Catholic Colleges that are in good standing with the Church and provide great liberal arts educations are: University of Dallas, Benedictine College, and Ave Maria University. But there are many more out there. Good luck in finding one!


#3

How about teaching in Catholic school?


#4

I want to have a Catholic job too. The only one I could think of is the priesthood (or volunteer at the church). Working in a Catholic school, as poster #3 said, sounds like a good idea.
Maybe a third order would be good (I know little about them, don’t even know if you are payed like an actual job).


#5

If you like and are good at writing, many dioceses have a newspaper. Perhaps one in your area does, too. You could always intern on your summers off and after college… who knows…


#6

Kudos to you for doing your homework early on this.

If you like writing (and journalism?), perhaps a Catholic journalist in the field could give you some tips, like Colleen Carroll Campbell, or Teresa Tomeo. Even if they can’t respond to you directly, maybe someone who monitors their e-mails/messages can.

There’s a Catholic Press Association: catholicpress.org/

My friends who have gone on to take “Catholic” jobs are youth ministers and Catholic school employees mostly. Some are pursuing doctoral degrees in theology to become theology professors. There are some who pursued degrees in social work and counseling.

Also, keep in mind that you can serve others in a job that’s not necessarily labeled as “Catholic.” For example, one of my classmates is an accountant who does a lot of volunteer work with the elderly each tax season. Another friend is an obstetrician-gynecologist whose practice is totally pro-life, dedicated to NFP, no contraceptives or abortions performed, of course. You can be an architect dedicated to Sacred Architecture. Another friend is a sculptor of sacred art. Another friends is a computer programmer, and he has set up an entire computer system for a Catholic non-profit that couldn’t have afforded it otherwise. I heard a Catholic scientist on Catholic radio just yesterday talking about her discovery of a cardiac adult stem cell that was the first major step toward strengthening the position that embryonic stem cells are not needed. etc etc See? :slight_smile:

So maybe take a really careful inventory of your gifts (what else besides writing?), and brainstorm about how you might be able to use those gifts to serve others, even if it may not be in a “Catholic” job.

Best wishes!


#7

I am a public school teacher in a school only five minutes from my parish. Although I can't afford to teach in the school at my parish, I see many of my students at mass (and in the line for confessions :D).

My point is that, as others have said, you need to think a little more broadly before you think specifics. As Catholics, we are called to live in the world and bring Christ's light and love into it. A very few are called to separate themselves from the world in cloistered communities of consecrated religious.

SO, do an inventory of your skills, and maybe a career/interest inventory to help you see some options. I did this in high school and my highest score was "elementary school teacher!" That did not seem to fit me at the time, but ten years later I got my first job teaching -- you just never know.

This is a beautiful time in your life. Pray and relax and pray and research and breathe -- and pray. You'll find your way as you go. Try not to get sidetracked by not having the whole picture right now. Just take the one, next step... then take the next one step... and so one.

God bless you, dear one!

Gertie


#8

Im wondering a much similar thing to.
I would even love to work with Catholic Answers in the future. I am considering communications, and become like a speaker, I want to preach and know my faith and tell people they have a home. But I am still discerning. It’s hard when you have some Scrupulosity. .__.


#9

Oh, yes--and pray, pray, and then pray some more!

I find the following inspiring. It's taken from an article aimed more toward those discerning a religious vocation, but the same principles still generally apply to all of us:

Have faith and trust
God’s call is not a game of hide-and-seek. God wants to reveal your vocation to you, and He will do so. It may not be on your time frame or in the manner you are expecting, yet the call will come in a way that you will recognize it. In the end, it is God’s call and He will reveal it in His time. Be patient and trust that He will lead you.

Don't just talk, listen
It is not easy to sit in silence. Yet your prayer must include silence so that your heart can rest in God and hear His call. Take time in your prayer to sit quietly and, if possible, do so in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament. Sitting quietly with the Lord allows Him the time to work on your heart and direct it according to His will.

vocation.nd.edu/are-you-called/discernment-tips/listen-for-god-s-call/


#10

I just have to say, I found this website this week and posted my problem, hoping maybe one person would see and reply. I'm astounded that so many people posted! So thank you all for that.

A theology teacher came to mind as a possible job, but public speaking makes me very nervous and I feel that I'd be too nervous to be a teacher. This also takes away the option of doing Talks and stuff like that.

My mom has raised me to be a huge advocate of the pro-life movement, but I have no interest in science/math related subjects (I had thought about working in a Catholic clinic or hospital). So there goes that option.

I've also considered being a journalist for a Catholic newspaper, but I'm assuming the pay is very low and as bad as it is, I need a well-paying job in this economy, especially if I want to try to publish a book or something in my free time. Also, I've never really considered journalism. I usually lean toward creative writing.

Any input?


#11

Hmm…maybe just decide to dedicate some time to seeking out 3 or 4 adults in your area who have jobs you find interesting or somewhat interesting, and ask to meet with them. Maybe include one or two you find interesting, but feel would be a “long shot”–at this point, you’re just doing research. Even if you’re not entirely convinced that the kind of work they do is what you would like to do, they can (a) give you more insight themselves, so you can then verify yourself whether you might like it or not, and (b) tell you about the people they work with, and the other types of jobs those people have.

Also, at community colleges and elsewhere, there are career counseling centers, where you can take tests that indicate your strengths and weaknesses, and different types of jobs/fields that might be suitable for you. I believe these services are available either for free or for a low fee, even if you’re not a student there.

Google terms like “hot jobs,” “growing jobs,” “worker shortages,” etc.

Taking some time to identify other strengths in addition to writing could help too–if you speak with people and let them know several of your strengths/interests, they can discuss more options with you. So, what else do you feel are your strengths? Organizing work and making plans? (Project managers do that in a variety of fields.) Persuading others of the benefits of something? (Marketing jobs, for example) Have others repeatedly called on you to complete a particular type of role in a group or on a team? If so, that might be an indication of what others recognize as one of your strengths.

A novena to St. Joseph the Worker might not be a bad investment as you start your decision making. St. Teresa of Avila said he was a powerful intercessor for her. :wink:


#12

You might also want to check out Catholic Charities USA at catholiccharitiesusa.org/.


#13

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.