What did Jesus meant in Luke 6:30


#1

Luke 6:30 : Give to everyone who asks you, and if anyone takes what belongs to you, do not demand it back.

So if someone takes my expensive computer or if an old lady who can barely survive with her money gets robbed me or she aren’t supposed to demand our stuff back?

Also “Give to everyone who asks you”, if someone asks for your expensive computer will you just give it to him? Or if someone asks something all day (for example, come to town with me, come play with me,…) are you supposed to say yes to everything?


#2

[quote="Timi_Celcer, post:1, topic:332837"]
Luke 6:30 : Give to everyone who asks you, and if anyone takes what belongs to you, do not demand it back.

So if someone takes my expensive computer or if an old lady who can barely survive with her money gets robbed me or she aren't supposed to demand our stuff back?

Also "Give to everyone who asks you", if someone asks for your expensive computer will you just give it to him? Or if someone asks something all day (for example, come to town with me, come play with me,...) are you supposed to say yes to everything?

[/quote]

D-R Bible, Haydock Commentary:

Ver. 30. Jesus Christ does not order us never to refuse a petition: but the meaning of his words is, that we are to give what is just and reasonable, what will be neither injurious to yourself nor your family; for what is unjustly asked, may be justly denied. (St. Augustine, lib. x. chap. 40. de serm. Dom. in Monte.) --- But in this, the sin we commit is often far from trivial; particularly, when to the refusal of a just request, we add also reprehensions and complaints. For why, say we, does he not labour? why has he reduced himself to penury, through his own indolence?---But, tell me, do you live upon the fruits of your own industry? On the supposition that you do, is it not that you may have some plea to reprehend another for the morsel of bread he begs at your hands? You give him no charitable relief, give him then no contumelious words: if you have no compassion for him yourself, do not prevent others from shewing him commiseration. Abraham, in the number of guests he received, had the honour of receiving under his roof even angels. Let us not, therefore, be strict and unfavourable judges in regard of our suffering and distressed neighbours, lest perhaps we ourselves come to be more severely judged. (St. Chrysostom collected from hom. xxi. in ep. ad. Rom. --- Hom. xi. in ep. ad. Heb. and hom. ii. de Lazaro.)


#3

The key to understanding such verses is contained in the second great commandment…Love your neighbor as yourself (Mt 22:36-40) This is also echoed in the so called “Golden Rule” which just so happens to be the very next verse, Luke 6:31 - Do unto others as you would have them do unto you".
Thistle’s reply - a quote from a commentary and from St Augustine -likewise echoes this idea of treating others as we would wish to be treated.

The thing to remember is that this works in different ways. If you were in need - surely you would wish others to share with you, but you would not (or at least should not) wish them to do so to the point of injuring themselves or denying necessaries to their children or spouse etc…so you would only ask for what you truly need - and no more.
So - when considering how to respond to someone who asks of you - you must consider what you would wish the reply to be if you were in their shoes.

The issue of stealing is something more difficult. Yet still the “Golden Rules” still applies. If you would not steal…it is reasonable to expect not to be stolen from. But charity must prevail in all things. The question needs to be asked why they stole…how much did they take…was it from your necessaries or from your abundance…What is the best and most loving way to deal with the matter (if they are caught).

Another aspect of this is that as Christians we should not become attached to “things”. Remember the Rich young man who could not let go of his possessions even though doing so would help him achieve perfection.
If someone takes something that is unimportant to us…do we worry about getting it back? Probably not. If it is important and we want/need it back…is it important for the right reasons and is our attitude toward the one who took it a charitable one?

Obviously there are not easy and clear cut answers to these things. Only prayer and meditation on God’s Love toward us and how we can best show that Love to the world.

Peace
James


#4

Hi Timi

It’s a challenging and radical statement, isn’t it?! Just like “Do not resist evil” (Matthew 5:39).

I think there are ways to moderate its meaning, but I rather think we’re best leaving it to hit us as it stands, without any diluting down. Jesus shows us the radical nature of the Kingdom of God.

God bless +


#5

[quote="Michael_Allen, post:4, topic:332837"]
Hi Timi

It's a challenging and radical statement, isn't it?! Just like "Do not resist evil" (Matthew 5:39).

I think there are ways to moderate its meaning, but I rather think we're best leaving it to hit us as it stands, without any diluting down. Jesus shows us the radical nature of the Kingdom of God.

God bless +

[/quote]

:thumbsup::thumbsup:

And speaking of the radical nature of the Kingdom...Jesus also says that we must be perfect as our heavenly Father is perfect. (Mt 5:48)...The context of this is showing Love to others - even enemies -

Peace
James


#6

My question about this verse is that Jesus later appears to do so in John 18, and aren’t we obligated to fight for the rights of the pre-born, the fetus about to be killed? Don’t these things require resisting one who does evil?


#7

This is an old thread. We are not to resurrect old threads. You should start a new thread even to discuss the same topic.


#8

Such a policy promotes clutter and waste as multiple threads are created and stored on a server for the same discussion, but if you insist …


#9

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