What do Catholics and protestants have in COMMON?


#1

Since all the original inventors of protestantism were Catholic (as were all the early protestant laity), and protestantism came from Catholicism, one would suppose that we would have a fair amount of doctrine in common.

Of course, there’s no such thing as “protestant doctrine,” but I’m thinking of doctrines held in common by Catholics and ALL the “significant” protestant faiths. I’m not considering the doctrines of various non-denominational churches or oddball fringe groups. Admittedly, this is a vague definition.

I wouldn’t consider marriage an example of such a doctrine, because it’s not distinctly Christian. Nor would I consider water Baptism such a doctrine, because the amount of common understanding is very small and superficial.

I could think of only a few doctrines that we have in common with our “mainline” separated brethren, namely:
[list]
*]We believe that Jesus is the Son of God
*]We believe in a Triune God (Father, Son, Holy Spirit)
*]We believe in an afterlife / Heaven
[/list]
and that’s all I could come up with.

Can anyone add to this list?


#2

We also believe that Jesus was born of a virgin by the name of Mary and that He was conceived by through the power of the Holy Spirit.

MaggieOH


#3

Since most Protestant churches use the same Apostles creed as Catholics, I would say that would be a fair representation of common belief. Of course they make it a point of not capitalizing the term “Catholic Church”, which really does not present a problem for me, since in that context the term catholic refers to the universal church and not necessarily the Roman Catholic Church. I have quoted the Apostles below.

I believe in God, the Father almighty, creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, God’s only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried; he descended to the dead. On the third day he rose again; he ascended into heaven, he is seated at the right hand of the Father, and he will come again to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting.

Blessings,

John


#4

The reformers claimed to adhere to the first 4 Ecunemical Councils (of course they said it could be non-binding if it contradicted with their interprettion of scripture) those were Christological Councils so there wouldn’t be to much controversy between catholics and protestants on the outcome and conclusion of those councils. Some of the councils immediately following included the iconclast controversy which would be problematic for the reformers especially Calvin since he was an icnoclast himself.

Luther replaced ony holy catholic and apostolic church with the word Christian to avoid the uncomfortable conclusion he was seperated from the true church. Many mainliners have reinserted the original terminology. Some have stuck with the Luther substitution Christian.
Of curse the entire New Testament is something we share and a tradition they took from us and we don’t credit for. Its like it fell out of the sky or something. We share the sacrament of triune baptism.


#5

** * A Trinitarian God**

** * Seven ‘Sacraments’** (Anglicans, though they make a distinction in elevating Baptism and Holy Eucharist above the others.)

** * Apostolic Succession** (Again Anglican, but invalid in most cases)

** * Transubstantiation** (Anglican, though optional and originally condemned)

** * Marian Devotion** (Rare, though in some Anglican circles the Angelus and Catholic Rosary are prayed. A devotion to Our Lady of Walsingham)

** * Episcopal Government** (In Methodist, Anglican, and a few others)

** * The Acceptance of the Seven Ecumenical Councils** (In some cases)

** * The use of the ‘Apocrypha’** (Anglican, used during ‘Mass’ but not binding on doctrinal matters)

** * Use of Crucifix, altar rail, facing the altar/tabernacle rather than the people, ect…** (A few traditions used here and there in Anglican Churches)

** * Adherence to the Nicene and Apostles Creed, the Athanasian Creed is also used. **

** * Supreme Earthly Head ** (In the Anglican Church it is currently Queen Elizabeth II, the Spiritual Leader being Archbishop Dr. Rowan Williams )


#6

the Nicene Creed as well, prayer, Christian hope, Scripture, common worship, baptism,

“So much more unites us rather than divides us”

Paul 6


#7

Pretty much everything that doesn’t feel “Catholic” to them. :smiley:


#8

And here’s me reading 'till my eyes fall out trying to discern the difference. What a waste of time that’s been!

I guess that there are always extremists screaming abuse from the sides (Chick bunch springs to mind) but when you get right down to it we all know where we came from…the Catholic Church!!


#9

We also believe that Jesus was born of a virgin by the name of Mary and that He was conceived by through the power of the Holy Spirit.

Thanks, Maggie, these are good and valid points which should be included in the list.

I appreciate those who have tried to help, but I think some folks didn’t understand the question.

Since most Protestant churches use the same Apostles creed as Catholics, I would say that would be a fair representation of common belief.

The Baptists are the largest protestant denomination in the US, and they don’t say the Creed. Nor do pentacostal churches. I can’t consider this to be common ground.

the Nicene Creed as well, prayer, Christian hope, Scripture, common worship, baptism,

Again, the Creed is hardly common. Prayer, scripture, and worship aren’t distinctly Christian (per my question, I’m looking for distinctly Christian beliefs). And also I can’t include baptism for the reasons I stated in the original question. I believe “Christian hope” is just an aspect of salvation, which I’ve already included in my very short list. I don’t think any of these items are truly common Christian doctrines.

Seven 'Sacraments, Apostolic Succession, Transubstantiation, Marian Devotion, Episcopal Government, The Acceptance of the Seven Ecumenical Councils, Apocrypha, Use of Crucifix, altar rail, facing the altar/tabernacle rather than the people, etc…, Supreme Earthly Head

Thanks, but this response has NOTHING to do with the question. I wasn’t interested in doctrines that we had in common with one or maybe two protestant denominations but doctrines common to ALL mainline protestant denominations. These doctrines are accepted by only a small handful of protestants (mainly traditional Anglican)…


closed #10

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