What do people think of the movie 'Fight Club'?

Through Mary, Comforter of the Afflicted,

Because I think it definitely is one of my most favorite movies ever. I honestly feel that it is a very, very good movie, with alot of deep stuff which a) is actually moral and makes sense and b) isn't in the least against Catholic teaching. I'm not going to talk about the plot of the film very much nor give a summary as I don't want to spoil it for people.

Now, Í just saw this film recently, like month or 2 ago and I'm not one who is very impressionable on a film even when it is really good. Just today, i saw the Nightmare before Christmas and even though it is good, very bad and far from horrible, its not that great of a movie and I noticed alot of flaws in it.

Now back to Fight Club. I'll be the first to admit that Fight Club is a very violent film and is very suggestive, with some nudity scattered throughout yet thats the point. Without the violence, Fight Club would be pointless. Do you imagine writing an article about sex trafficking without mentioning the rapes and murders of that bastard industry? Can you speak about the Catholic Church without mentioning the Blessed Virgin Mary and the Pope, both things which non-catholics pretend to hate? Also, I feel that the nudity in it, while immodest, wasn't exactly pornographic as it was done for the art. Even the bits where the unnamed protagonist (lets call him Jack) recounts how Tyler would slip things in the restaurant food and the tapes in the film theater were necessary for me as they showed just how insane and depraved both of them were (although there is a still shot of an erect penis which lasts for half a second to wards the very, very end of the film which to me was totally unnecessary and gratuitous).

Now about the philosophy of the film... there is no philosophy. In fact, the word 'Philosophy' should be replaced with 'themes' here as this is what this film has. Its not telling us which religion we should have and its not telling us how we should look at the spiritual like the Matrix films (which I haven't seen for years and years and which I found to be boring and tedious while also heretical). Rather, its 'telling' us how we should be more active, that there is more to life than work, bed and materialism while also delving deep into psychology. And no, if you think that this film is going to be one boring ramble about psychological issues then you're completely wrong. Instead of having a character learning about this hard stuff and achieving freedom through learning about it, we have this character who is becoming insane slowly and surely and who is unsure of his life but we never have another character to tell us this is wrong and all that.

Now, I really don't mean to be foul mouthed but basically, what I'm saying is that sh** happens in this movie like how they say it on the INTERNET. We are supposed to be draw our own conclusions and morals from the story and not having it shoved down our faces and it works, it really, really works. It is more inspiring than having morals showed down your throat because in the former, we think about whether there is a point for doing good actions or evil ones, we look on both sides of the coin and finally...

Look, I won't give it away, O.K? I really, really do suggest seeing this film. I honestly can't believe how grossly underrated this film is as in my opinion, it is definitely one of the greatest and most perfect films ever. Everything is good about it: all the actors are really good especially Norton and Carter, the atmosphere and the directing I can't describe but the best thing is the story. Just see it. Half way through the character loses and realizes something devastating about himself but I won't give it away. Don't be put off though by the nudity (actually there is very, very little nudity at all in this film. It's mostly just alot of suggestive experiences which the characters recount. Here's the Parents Guide here: imdb.com/title/tt0137523/parentalguide#certification) or the violence because they were necessary and aren't pornographic. While Mel Gibson is far from being a good Catholic so lets not bring that subject up, he made the film Apocalypto. Yes there was alot of nudity but what do you expect when the film is about uncivilized Indians? The nudity actually made sense in that context and it certainly wasn't gratuitous.

So, to the people who saw this film... what are your thoughts? Did you like ti and what did you think of it's themes? Do tell me.

You broke the first rule of Fight Club.

[quote="Nec5, post:2, topic:244796"]
You broke the first rule of Fight Club.

[/quote]

Ha, ha, that is what I was going to say! :thumbsup:

Ive seen it after being forced to by my secular humanist friend - a movie afficiando to buy the DVD. I had no intention of seeing when it initially came out, thus was reluctant because I had the impression it would be all vulgar.

However, I was totally engrossed with it, and never knew where it was leading (although I should have guessed). I suppose it kind of peters out at the end, but I was pretty impressed with it overall.

Although I wouldn't recommend it for a family movie day though! :thumbsup:

MJ

I thought so little of it that I really can’t remember much about it, including why I disliked it so much. I know my wife fell asleep halfway through it, and I was thoroughly disappointed in the ending, but that’s about all I remember from it.

I did end up reading a more recent novel by the guy who wrote the book on which it was based. It was bad enough that I don’t care to remember the name of it, and could never begin to consider reading anything else by him.

Sorry if this is a bit vague, but it was one of those things that so unimpressed me that there’s almost nothing of it left in my head. I remember more about the trailer than the actual movie.

The movie had much to say about materialism. That was good. It also had something to say about what happened to a generation of men emasculated by feminism and often abandoned by fathers. That was also good. It also spoke to another societal ill--that we are living in distinct isolation, without any sense of community, so much so that this man is driven to blow up his own life, rejecting it's materialistic basis, and create a community (partly through his own sleep-deprived hallucinations) in a poor run-down home.

But being a man can't be cooked down to being able to take and give pain in physical combat. If you think you need that, enlist and beg to be infantry. You will find some redeeming work there, but you won't find an accurate measure of all it means to be a man in it's fulness. If you want to know what it means to be a man, study the life of Christ and his holy ones down through the ages.

Likewise, the answer to materialism and rampant hyper-capitalism isn't anarchy as symbolised by blowing up the financial buildings. I would direct you rather to the social teachings of the Catholic faith in the papal encyclicals here and here.

And cruising different kinds of twelve-step and grief-counselling groups pretending to be one of them when you aren't probably isn't the best choice for how to meet your future spouse. :)

[quote="mulayeuxbleu, post:6, topic:244796"]
The movie had much to say about materialism. That was good. It also had something to say about what happened to a generation of men emasculated by feminism and often abandoned by fathers. That was also good. It also spoke to another societal ill--that we are living in distinct isolation, without any sense of community, so much so that this man is driven to blow up his own life, rejecting it's materialistic basis, and create a community (partly through his own sleep-deprived hallucinations) in a poor run-down home.

But being a man can't be cooked down to being able to take and give pain in physical combat. If you think you need that, enlist and beg to be infantry. You will find some redeeming work there, but you won't find an accurate measure of all it means to be a man in it's fulness. If you want to know what it means to be a man, study the life of Christ and his holy ones down through the ages.

Likewise, the answer to materialism and rampant hyper-capitalism isn't anarchy as symbolised by blowing up the financial buildings. I would direct you rather to the social teachings of the Catholic faith in the papal encyclicals here and here.

And cruising different kinds of twelve-step and grief-counselling groups pretending to be one of them when you aren't probably isn't the best choice for how to meet your future spouse. :)

[/quote]

My thoughts exactly:). I mean, any idiot could see that starting an anarchist fight club is bad. Oh, wait... oops:blush:.

I don't know how it peters off at the end because the last bit with the (SPOILERS) infiltration actually made sense to me, considering the evils which society is capable of and the twist ending actually makes sense to me. How does it not make sense? We are supposed to see the other events of the film now as if they were in the protagonists mind. Multiple personality dis-order, and it really does exist. I admit that the very, verly last bit how Tyler is killed didn't make much sense to me, even though it can be interpreted as Jack knocking himself back into reality and even though we don't want anyone any ill will, Tylers death was really, really satisfying especially for the protagonsit.

Gordon Sims... I hate you! Fight CLub is ttly AAAAWESOOOME!!!!!!!!!!

Ok, I'm just kidding there you know:) but I have to disagree with you. I don't know what you were expecting when you watched this movie but people should be aware that this movie is a strange sort of movie, that it is character driven (as all stories should be!) and not action driven. People must see the poit of this whole movie and dwell deeper into it's meaning.

this movie that you shouldn't talk about becuase its against the rules of that movie. But its a great movie one of my favorites.

this probably isn't the best place though to come pick a fight with people we are very nice people here. :D

Fantastic plot. I liked it. It’s one of those movies my wife actually stayed away through the entire time, which is very rare. But I tend to like violent movies anyway because of my boxing and martial arts upbringing/training. It’s definitely NOT for children. The moral of the story seems to be pretty good dealing with letting go and getting down to basics. . When life gets you down, guys, it’s time to Man-Up.

I thought it was a clever film. But I found it pretty depressing, and kind of phony. As a practitioner of martial arts(Aikido) I felt that there would realistically have been far more fatalities in such fights( particularly with no rules, all skill levels, and bare knuckles) recipe for disaster. :eek:

Not wishing to be contrary, as I generally quite like Edward Norton and David Fincher, but I found Fight Club to be derivative, narcissistic nonsense aimed at teenage boys who have just discovered Nietzsche and Nine Inch Nails. Part of the problem maybe Chuck Palahniuk’s novella; he is an author who essentially lives in the shadow of Camus and Coupland, creating a watered down, didactic and thoroughly ‘pop’ synthesis - the very qualities he repudiates. Someone once said of the Western ‘Once Upon a Time in the West’ that its message lies between ‘Communism and Coca Cola, between the bomb and the refrigerator’, and this seems like a perfect description of ‘Fight Club’; in other words, its worthy ideologies fail to escape the triviality of its nature.

In Fincher’s favour, however, I do think his vision of Fight Club is far better than Palahniuk’s, plus the performances are utterly wonderful, in-particular Helena Bonham-Carter who makes the most out of a fairly flimsy part. It annoys me how female parts in ‘boy-zone’ films are seemingly added on as an after thought.

My main objection to the film is that it suggests that, underneath it all, men are all violent animals who would rather punch each others faces in rather than discuss their feelings; the latter quality considered utterly ‘feminine’ rather than something that unites both genders.

I have no real problem with its politics, as it seems utterly flippant about them; the ‘why do you need a duvet?’ scene is, at best, tiresome and the ‘twist’ regarding Norton’s sanity (not wishing to give it away for those who have yet to see it) is a prime example of a storyteller running away from the themes presented in Acts 1 and 2.

I will not get in to whether the film is ‘pro-Catholic’ as I’m sure you can read such things in any film; as is the case with all theoretical readings of art.

Overall, then, ‘Fight Club’ is a splendidly made film based upon half-readings and half-renderings of far more important subjects than itself. However, the film clearly must have touched a nerve, as every ‘The Greatest Films in the History of Everything Ever, Honestly’ lists situate it amoung the top five (in England at least).

[quote="Disinherited, post:7, topic:244796"]
Gordon Sims... I hate you! Fight CLub is ttly AAAAWESOOOME!!!!!!!!!!

Ok, I'm just kidding there you know:) but I have to disagree with you. I don't know what you were expecting when you watched this movie but people should be aware that this movie is a strange sort of movie, that it is character driven (as all stories should be!) and not action driven. People must see the poit of this whole movie and dwell deeper into it's meaning.

[/quote]

I have friends who are huge fans, and even after discussing it with them, I still didn't see what they were seeing in it. It just didn't make a connection with me. Then again, I have friends who are huge fans of Memento and throw fits when I tell them that it's just a less funny remake of Dana Carvey's Clean Slate, and not nearly as rewatchable. :D

Its pefectly normal and absolutely not wrong to not like a film which many people hold to be good :slight_smile: (even if you are completely wrong). I tried watching ‘No COuntry for old men’ and though I wanted to finish it, I just couldn’t. It was tok slow and boring for me, with nothing very important happening. We couldn’t finish Pul Fiction either for the same reasons even though it was mor ebearable and I have an urge to watch it again.

I also don’t like the Spiderman films because, face it, they’re goofy, bland, uninteresting and just there to be summer movies. I also don’t like Batman 1989 because, while it did help comic book movies to become darker and more serious and while the style is beautiful, it still is a bland movie for me at least. I certainly isn’t the masterpiece people make it out to be, its just OK in my opinion.

[quote="Disinherited, post:13, topic:244796"]
I also don't like Batman 1989 because, while it did help comic book movies to become darker and more serious and while the style is beautiful, it still is a bland movie for me at least. I certainly isn't the masterpiece people make it out to be, its just OK in my opinion.

[/quote]

It's Tim Burton. I'd say he's all style and no substance, but that would be an insult to Michael Bay.

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.