What Do You Do When There is a Prayer You Disagree With?


#1

And by that I mean during the Prayers of the Faithful. I pretty frequently hear prayers that I disagree with in part or in whole. The most notable example would be a few years back during a weekday Mass when a priest prayed for passage of Obamacare. What should we do during these times? Or rather, what do you do?


#2

I would think the best thing to do is to be honest and not to respond with the "Lord, hear our prayer."


#3

I can't remember ever hearing a prayer of the faithful that I couldn't agree with. I suppose in the situation you described, I would mentally adapt the prayer to something I could pray for. For example, praying that everyone has a way to receive the healthcare they need rather than praying specifically for "Obamacare".

The people who write the prayers of the faithful in each parish are ordinary people who may not always have a gift for writing or who may genuinely misunderstand the implications of their statements.

The priest in question, for example, was likely intending to pray that people had the means and access to see a doctor when they needed one. The intention for "Obamacare" was a short-hand way to say that - especially since many people who don't follow policy discussions closely didn't realize all the implications of it before it was passed.

We do well to assume the best in people's words and actions, and pray that God gives us humility in all situations.


#4

God knows what you want. He knows what you want to and don't want him to support in your life. I did the same thing. Just don't say lord hear our prayer


#5

I have been taught to pray "Lord, I cannot pray for that"


#6

[quote="arcangel49, post:4, topic:309149"]
God knows what you want. He knows what you want to and don't want him to support in your life. I did the same thing. Just don't say lord hear our prayer

[/quote]

So when some pray for and some pray against who does God answer?


#7

[quote="Don_Jackson, post:6, topic:309149"]
So when some pray for and some pray against who does God answer?

[/quote]

God doesn't take sides in political agendas. He has his own plans, and those plans involve making successful the plan that will do humanity the most good. God will answer everybody's prayers, some with a yes, some with a no.

🌹Our lady of Guadalupe, pray for us🌹


#8

[quote="Georgia, post:2, topic:309149"]
I would think the best thing to do is to be honest and not to respond with the "Lord, hear our prayer."

[/quote]

:thumbsup:

[quote="po18guy, post:5, topic:309149"]
I have been taught to pray "Lord, I cannot pray for that"

[/quote]

Have never heard this before, but sounds like something I would do. :thumbsup:

~Liza


#9

[quote="lizaanne, post:8, topic:309149"]
:thumbsup:

Have never heard this before, but sounds like something I would do. :thumbsup:

~Liza

[/quote]

We can always simply pray that God's will be done. Honestly, I know not where they get some of the prayers. Most of the prayers are just fine, but some seem to proceed like the Lumberjack song form Monty Python - they begin just fine, then... well...


#10

I figure that however misguided our prayer requests might be I still want God to hear us. He can always say, “No, I don’t really think that would be for the best.”

That said, I think it’s a bad idea to be too political in prayer requests.


#11

[quote="SMHW, post:10, topic:309149"]
I figure that however misguided our prayer requests might be I still want God to hear us. He can always say, "No, I don't really think that would be for the best."

That said, I think it's a bad idea to be too political in prayer requests.

[/quote]

Why pray for something that you don't believe in? ( like Obama care)


#12

[quote="smndtupidisaftr, post:1, topic:309149"]
And by that I mean during the Prayers of the Faithful. I pretty frequently hear prayers that I disagree with in part or in whole. The most notable example would be a few years back during a weekday Mass when a priest prayed for passage of Obamacare. What should we do during these times? Or rather, what do you do?

[/quote]

:eek:

Wow, if I had heard that during Mass, I'd have looked like that smiley! I'd have a hard time keeping my feet from walking out of the church! To hear something like that, when the priests are so careful never to name names when it comes to political candidates, and not talk about the government, etc. would have floored me. It's just wrong.

Things like that are what give Catholics cover for voting for the party of death. "See, we're supposed to be supporting Obama!"

:mad::banghead:


#13

Instead of saying, “Lord hear our prayer,” you could pray “Thy will be done.”


#14

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:12, topic:309149"]
:eek:

Wow, if I had heard that during Mass, I'd have looked like that smiley! I'd have a hard time keeping my feet from walking out of the church! To hear something like that, when the priests are so careful never to name names when it comes to political candidates, and not talk about the government, etc. would have floored me. It's just wrong.

Things like that are what give Catholics cover for voting for the party of death. "See, we're supposed to be supporting Obama!"

:mad::banghead:

[/quote]

This remind me of back in early November; it was just before the election, and a visiting celebrant, during his homily, said that he cannot fathom a Catholic voting for the Democratic party. I felt uncomfortable during the homily, and after the homily was ended, the congregation applauded; because of how I felt, I did not applaud. I felt it breached from the spirituality and beautiful words that usually are said during the homily by my home priest. I did not feel comfortable discussing politics in church, and I was surprised it was brought up.

As for the OP, I would agree with the other posters. If you do not agree with what is said, you may either remain silent, or (as mentioned above me) say "Thy Will be done, O Lord" instead of "Lord, hear our prayer." Remember, the Lord knows your heart, and He will understand.

And, to beat a dead horse, I don't see the problem with "Obamacare." It helps people get their medication as well as the elderly. I see that as a good thing. :shrug:


#15

I like the “thy will be done” and really asking the Lord to HEAR is ok I think.
I use to pray with a group and I didn’t always agree with what some prayed for. (One guy was extreme (imo) republican). I would just pray that the Lord do HIS will as opposed to mine or my friend’s.


#16

[quote="Immacolata, post:14, topic:309149"]
This remind me of back in early November; it was just before the election, and a visiting celebrant, during his homily, said that he cannot fathom a Catholic voting for the Democratic party. I felt uncomfortable during the homily, and after the homily was ended, the congregation applauded; because of how I felt, I did not applaud. I felt it breached from the spirituality and beautiful words that usually are said during the homily by my home priest. I did not feel comfortable discussing politics in church, and I was surprised it was brought up.

As for the OP, I would agree with the other posters. If you do not agree with what is said, you may either remain silent, or (as mentioned above me) say "Thy Will be done, O Lord" instead of "Lord, hear our prayer." Remember, the Lord knows your heart, and He will understand.

And, to beat a dead horse, I don't see the problem with "Obamacare." It helps people get their medication as well as the elderly. I see that as a good thing. :shrug:

[/quote]

I don't think applause is EVER appropriate in church, but I would ask you to examine your conscience and see why that priest stated what he did. Maybe you felt uncomfortable because you recognize that there is a big disconnect between what the Church teaches and that party espouses? Both parties have their differences and there is no perfect political party for a Catholic but when there is total support for unlimited abortion (and other non-negotiables) from a political party I do think Catholics would be wise to consider what that means for their votes.

There are many churches (not Catholic) where not only are political candidates mentioned by name, but the congregation is told in no uncertain terms who to vote for. And buses are arranged to take them to the polls on election day, and they are fed after voting.


#17

[quote="Nan_S, post:13, topic:309149"]
Instead of saying, "Lord hear our prayer," you could pray "Thy will be done."

[/quote]

^This. Beat me to it.


#18

[quote="marytk, post:15, topic:309149"]
I like the "thy will be done" and really asking the Lord to HEAR is ok I think.
I use to pray with a group and I didn't always agree with what some prayed for. (One guy was extreme (imo) republican). I would just pray that the Lord do HIS will as opposed to mine or my friend's.

[/quote]

I agree. I think it is OK to say the response "Lord Hear our prayer" (even though I would probably do as others have suggest and remain silent), and let the Lord answer according to His will.


#19

[quote="smndtupidisaftr, post:1, topic:309149"]
And by that I mean during the Prayers of the Faithful. I pretty frequently hear prayers that I disagree with in part or in whole. The most notable example would be a few years back during a weekday Mass when a priest prayed for passage of Obamacare. What should we do during these times? Or rather, what do you do?

[/quote]

First of all it would be good to report this to the Bishop in a letter. Second of all, vote with your feet and your check book and leave that place if you can. Find yourself a Traditional Latin Mass or an Eastern Catholic Liturgy.

If you have no other options for Mass I would just not participate in that part of the Mass.


#20

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:16, topic:309149"]
I don't think applause is EVER appropriate in church, but I would ask you to examine your conscience and see why that priest stated what he did. Maybe you felt uncomfortable because you recognize that there is a big disconnect between what the Church teaches and that party espouses? Both parties have their differences and there is no perfect political party for a Catholic but when there is total support for unlimited abortion (and other non-negotiables) from a political party I do think Catholics would be wise to consider what that means for their votes.

[/quote]

I didn't think it was entirely appropriate to applaud either, but the entire congregation (from what I could tell) did it so my mother and I did it as well. As for examining my conscience, I felt uncomfortable because I tend to go more to the left than right in political issues, and I didn't think it was appropriate to talk about political matters in church. At today's Mass, however, the homily was presided by a visiting Monsignor and was much more beautiful, if I say so myself.

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:16, topic:309149"]
There are many churches (not Catholic) where not only are political candidates mentioned by name, but the congregation is told in no uncertain terms who to vote for. And buses are arranged to take them to the polls on election day, and they are fed after voting.

[/quote]

I haven't heard of that before; how surprising that churches would do such a thing.


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